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ANNUAL RiPORT 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

OF MARYLAND 
1962 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/report00mary_87 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
NINETY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

State Board of Education 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



MARYLAND DIRECTORY OF SCHOOL OFFICIALS 



MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

iVame Address Term ExpiTes 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., President Federalsburg 1964 

Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole, Vice President Chevy Chase 1962 

Mrs. J. Wilmer Cronin Aberdeen 1966 

C. William Hetzer Williamsport 1968 

Dwight 0. W. Holmes Baltimore 1965 

Richard Schifter Bethesda 1963 

William L. Wilson Cumberland 1967 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer 



MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

STATE OFFICE BUILDING 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 

Name Office 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr State Superintendent of Schools 

David W. Zimmerman Deputy State Superintendent 

William S. Sartorius Assistant State Superintendent in Administration, Finance, and Research 

W. Theodore Boston Director of Certification and Accreditation 

Herschel M. James Director of Vocational Education 

Nettie B. Taj'lor Director of Library Extension 

Robert C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

W'illis H. White Director of Instruction 

E. Drusilla Chairs Administrative Assistant I 

Dorothea E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Octavia D. Hastings Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne M. Rvland Senior Stenographer 

Walter Blackwell Chauffeur II 



Division of Instruction — WiLLls H. WHITE, Director 

Paul E, HufRngton Assistant Director and Supervisor of High Schools 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas W. Pyles Supervisor of High Schools 

Lewin A. Wheat Supervisor of High Schools 

•Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of Instruction 

Herbert R. Steiner ^ Supervisor of Physical Education 

Sarah L. Leiter : Supervisor of Pupil Services 

Andrew W. Mason Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Rozelle J. Miller Supervisor of Special Education 

Beverly J. Sheain . Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Marilyn Buckner Senior Stenographer 

Mildred M. Faulstich Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Janet L. Harrison Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rosalind C. Lohrfinck Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rena B. Levitz Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Marlene Barber Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Oma K. McClung Senior Typist 



Division of Vocational Education — HersCHEL M. James, Director 



Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Glenn W. Lewis Executive Secretary, ^Vlaryland Future Farmers 

of America and Xew Farmers of America, 
Easton High School, Easton 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Mrs. Mary N. Stultz Executive Secretary, Future Homemakers_ of 

America and New Homemakers of America, 
Board of Education, Frederick 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Sandra R. Bush Senior Stenographer 

Lillian 0. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Florence M. Brady Junior Clerk 



Part time 



Division of Certification and Accreditation — W. THEODORE BOSTON, Director 

Name Office 

James L. Reid AsBistant Director and Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

M. Eleanor Rice Super\isor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Pro^rram 

Harold D. Reese Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education 

C. William Anthony Supervisor of Teacher Recruitment 

Carroll L. Speck Assistant Supervisor of Certification 

Ruth E. Hobbs Assistant Supervisor of Equivalence Examinations 

George A. Myers Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Charles 0. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Trade Schools 

Elsie F. Forman Counselor 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

Anne Nusinov Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Mrs, Bessie R. Gale Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Dolores B. Jones Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. EveljTi R. McClurkin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Bessie I. Rones Senior Stenographer 

Helen D. Wysocki Senior Stenographer 

Leah C. Dittmar Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Geraldine L. Henry Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Marie F. Schumann Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Hanna Z. Streett Senior Clerk 

STATE CURRICULUM CENTER 

400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Eleanor Hocker Counselor 

Mrs. Margaret J. Smith Library Assistant 

Division of Library Extension — Nettie B. Taylor, Director 

Kenneth F. Duchac Supervisor of Public Libraries 

Mae I. Graham Supervisor of School Libraries 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Martha J. Keydash Senior Stenographer 

Division of Administration, Finance, and Research 

William S. Sartorius, Assistant State Superintendent 

William L. Barall Supervisor of Finance 

Wesley N. Dorn Supervisor of Instruction (Research) 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

T. Wilson Cahall Supervisor of Special Project 

Howard E. Bosley Supervisor of Teachers College Business Management 

Morris W. Rannels Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Bernard G. G«yer__ Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Helen D, George Editor 

Casimer P. Kotowski Auditor 

Margaret E. Albaugh Administrative Assistant II 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Statistician II 

Mrs. Virginia K. Goldsmith Statistician I 

Mrs. Verda M. McClow Statistician I 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Laura M. Gaither Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Norris Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Principal Account Clerk I 

Phyllis E. Rodgers Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Ruth S. Friedland Stenographer-Secretary 

Carry e Hamburger Stenographer- Secretary 

Lenore Klein Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Rose G. Snyder Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Winnie F. Holland Report Typist 

Mrs. Susan T. Brownfield Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Clara P. Haffner Senior Typist 

Mrs. Doris A. Lombardi Senior Key Punch Operator 

Mrs. Thelnia L. Baron Key Punch Operator Trainee 

Lloyd E. Holmes Office Appliance Operator 



3 



Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — ROBERT C. THOMPSON, Director 

Name Office 

W. Bird Terwilliger Assistant Director 

Lionel Burgess , Supervisor of Case Services 

**George W. Keller Assistant Supervisor of Services for the Blind 

*Francis J. Borges, M.D. Medical Adviser 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Principal Stenographer 

Alice F. O'Connor Principal Stenographer 

**Mrs. Catherine E. Shipley Senior Stenographer 



METROPOLITAN BALTIMORE OFFICE 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Assistant Supervisor 

Ernest O. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

Myrtle E. Chell Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Cochran Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

Mrs. Dorothy C. Clifford Counselor 

James G. Dashiell Counselor 

J. Bruce Edemy Counselor 

Mrs. Sue H. Flowers Counselor 

Martha R, Harrison Counselor 

Harold B. Hayes Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

Irwin D. Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor 

Charles L. Reis Counselor 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor 

Morris L. Scherr Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

M. Eugene Spurrier Counselor 

Lawrence E. Williams Counselor 

Emma E. Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Mabel C. Dwyer Senior Stenographer 

M. Eleanor Farnandis Senior Stenographer 

Rhona R. Fox Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Frances S. Goodwin Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Melvina A. Jackson Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. N. Helen Maslanka Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Mosner Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Lillian R. Pferdeort Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Vivien L. Sener Senior Stenographer 

Bell M. Sklar Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive M. Mayo Receptionist 



EASTERN SHORE DISTRICT 

700 East Main Street, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Jack R. Nichols Counselor 

1 — Joseph E. Guschke Counselor 

2 — Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Ruth K. Lunsford (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Dorthy H. Slagle (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

1 — Stevens Building, 29 Goldsboro Street, Easton 

2 — County Building, 400 High Street, Chestertown 



SOUTHERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

4310 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D. Myers Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Leslie B. Cole Counselor 

Harry F. Fauber Counselor 

1 — Fedon G. Nides Counselor 

1 — Myron V. Wotring Counselor 

2 — Stanley I. Scher Counselor 

3 — W. Carroll Walsh Counselor 

3 — F. dePaul Whitehurst Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Jeannette M. Dart Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Laura L. Turnbull (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

* Part time 

** Address: 2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 



4 



Name Office 

Mrs. Joan B. C. Clark Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Elizabeth M. Cruz Senior Stenographer 

Betty Carrol Jones Senior Stenogiapher 

1 — Speer Building, 3 Church Circle, Annapolis 

2 — Board of Education, La Plata 

3 — 26 South Perry Street, Rockville 



WESTERN MARYLAND DISTRICT 

74 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

n. Dorsey Devlin Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Bernard E. Kelly Counselor 

Edward J. Shuck Counselor 

1 — John M. Cobun Counselor 

2 — Stanley Hamilton, Jr Counselor 

3— William C. Hill Counselor 

1 — Mrs. Betty J. Lovenstein (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

2 — Mrs. Eleanor B. Gorsuch (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

3 — Mrs. Elizabeth K. Baker (half-time) Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Annie G. McCarty Senior Stenographer 

1— P. 0. Box 504, 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

2 — P.O. Box 121, Room 12, City Hall, Westminster 

3 — Board of Education, lib East Church Street, Frederick 



DISABILITY DETERMINATIONS PROGRAM 

(Old Age and Survivors' Insurance) 

10 East Fayette Street, Baltimore 2 

Robert L. Burton Assistant Supervisor in Charge 

Lawrence E. Brown Junior Counselor 

David Forsyth Junior Counselor 

Minnie Gerber Junior Counselor 

Arthur W. Rees Junior Counselor 

Ernest L. Walston, Jr. Junior Counselor 

• Hilary O'Herlihy, M.D._ Medical Adviser 

* Anderson M. Renick, M.D Medical Adviser 

*S. J. Veiiable, M.D Medical Advisor 

*Ralph Weber, M.D Medical Adviser 

Elizabeth B. DePolo Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Julia A. Fanning Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Glad.ys M. ^Latthews Senior Stenographer 

Mary C. Teves Senior Stenographer 

Betty Lee Block Senior Typist 

Joan G. Piekarski Senior Typist 



MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

Board of Trustees and Office Staff 
STATE OFFICE BUILDING 
301 West Preston Street, Baltimore 1 



Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

Louis L. Goldstein State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Director, Division of Instruction, State Department of Education 

Christ G. Christis Director 

Edgar T. Pfaff Administrative Assistant I 

Lewis L. Tignor Investment Administrator 

Stanley Katzen Accountant II 

George Pozoulakis Accounting Staff 

Ida Rosenberg Accounting Staff 

Ruth Connell Principal Accoimt Clerk I 

Eva Shagogue Senior Stenographer 

Elizabeth Ann Kern Investment Staff 

Mary Lou Druery Investment Staff" 

Mrs, Mildred Scott Senior Account Clerk 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anna M. Novak Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Anne Trhlik Senior Clerk 



* Part time 



5 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND 

County Library Librarian 

Allegrany Allegany County Library Mary G. Walsh 

Anne Arundel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Baltimore City Enoch Pratt Free Library Edwin Castagna. Director 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Calvert Calvert County Library Edward Hall 

Caroline Denton Public Library William Kairiph 

Carroll Carroll County Public Library, Westminster Margaret J. Iloefer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton^ Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Edward Hall 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge Airs. Ethel L. Bruya 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Thurmont Public Library _1 Mrs. Ernest Hammaker 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, Oakland--Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Roenna Fahrney 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Cliestertown Public Library William Rairigh 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Elizabeth B. Hage 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville Mrs. Mary M. Hoopes 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, Leonardtown. Edward Hall 

Somerset . Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfield Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library 

Talbot Talbot Coimty Free Library, Easton Mrs. Elizabeth H. Baker 

Washington Washington Coimty Free Library, Hagerstown Roy Provins 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Lucile Horsley 

Worcester Worcester County Library 1 Mrs. Dorothy G. Moore 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Parlett L. Moore Coppin, Baltimore-17 

Wilbur Devilbiss Salisbury 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFF 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
108 Washington Street, Cumberland 

Name Office 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Assistant Superintendent and Supervisor of High Schools 

Jack A. Petry Supervisor of High Schools 

Margaret E. Doak Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth I. Flake Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison - Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert E. Pence Supervisor of Physical Education 

LaVern J. Hahn Supervisor of Music Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics Education 

Julius D, Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

J. Hubert Radcliffe Supervisor of Transportation 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Glenn U. Hanna Visiting Teacher 

Esther M. Carter Visiting Teacher 

Eugene J. Hopkins Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Dixon Pitcher Financial Secretary and OfBce Manager 

Helen Burnett Dickerhoof Secretary to the Superintendent 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 
Green Street, Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander Administrative Assistant 

Katharine Kibler Supervisor of Publications 

Mrs. Alice Torovsky Secretary to the Superintendent 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent — Administration 

Frank C. Gunderloy Director of School Facilities 

Ernest H. Herklotz Supervisor of Purchasing 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Leonard Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis W. Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank O. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 



6 



Name Office 
ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Lawrence P. Bonari Assistant Supervisor — Transportation 

Henry G. Weaver Assistant Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Mrs. Mary Franke Assistant in Finance 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent — Elementary Schools 

Richard R. Clopper Director of Senior High Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Director of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Eva M. Pumphrey Director of Curriculum 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Winifred B. Fowler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Sarah "V. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Carl Mauro Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruby G. Myers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Everett Pettigrew Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alfred Bisset, Jr Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Carroll Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Wa3Tie M. Cornwell Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

James W. Dunagan Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Annabelle E. Ferguson Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Katherine K. Frantum Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Douglas S. King Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Edward Konick Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Betty J. Mitchell Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Dorothy Noble Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Roland Olson Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Joshua M. Potter Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glorious Shenton Supervisor of Spcondary Schools 

Doris Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

William J. Callaghan Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary E. Wellham Supervisor of Art 

Paul R. Gardner Supervisor of Guidance 

Mrs. Nancy C. Walker Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Thelma Sparks Supervisor of Mathematics 

Grady L. Ballard Director Dept. of Personnel and Research 

Jack Hogsten Assistant in Personnel 

Mrs. Elizabeth Strohl Secretary of Certification 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Special Services 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mre. Mary C. Brown Visiting Teacher 

Alice Gilbert Visiting Teacher 

Esther Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine Huggins Visiting Teacher 

B. Lewis Langdon Visiting Teacher 

Jay Orr Visiting Teacher 

Joseph Parlett Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Annie S. Witheridge Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Ruth Eason Supervisor of Special Education 

George E. Klinkhamer Supervisor of Special Education 

Marne L. Groff Chief Psychologist 

•Tohn Malcolm Psychologist 

Gporge Meissler Psychologist 

Dorothy Moskowitz Ps3'chologist 



BALTIMORE CITY 

3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltimore 18 

George B. Brain Superintendent of Schools 

Edwin Stein Deputy Superintendent 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent, Staff Services 

John W. Lewis -Assistant Superintendent, Business Management 

Vernon S, Vavrina Assistant Superintendent, Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Robert O. Lloyd Administrative Assistant, General Administration 

Edward H. Goldstein Special Assistant, General Administration 

Richard L. Micherdzinski Director of Art Education 

M. Thomas Goedeke Director of Business >ranagement 

Robert H. Nicholson Director of Cafeterias 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Edward Gersuk Area Director, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pearl W. Goetz Area Director, Elementary Education 

Helen Hermon Area Director of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion O. Johnson Area Director of Elempntary Education 

Mrs. E. Romaine Jones Area Director of Elementary Education 

Beatrice Rawlings Area Director. Elementarv Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director, Physical Education 



7 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

M. Bernice Wiese Director of Library Services 

Emile H. Serposs Director of Music Education 

Walter A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela M. Broening Director of Bureau of Publications 

Albert G. Packard Director of Educational Testing Service 

Leona C. Buchwald Director of Guidance and Placement Service 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services for Pupils 

H. Spilman Burns Director, Business Services 

Orlando F. Furno Director of Research 

Sidney N. Chernak Director, Secondary Schools 

William J. Hucksoll Director of Vocational Education 

Wilmer V. Bell Director of Adult Education 

Harrie M. Selznick Director of Special Educaton 

Charles Golab Director of School Buildings and Grounds 

Alexina C. Stidhara Administrative Assistant, Secondary, Vocational, Adult Education 

Lavinia W. Keagle Special Assistant, Special Education 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of Audio-Visual Education 

Mrs Eloise PayTie Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Elizabeth C. Bonthron Supervisor of Cafeterias 

John E. Wall Supervisor of Cafeteria Facilities 

Dwight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Equipment 

Frederick W. Kaufman Supervisor, Educational EquipmeTit 

Irvin R. Brose Supervisor of Educational Supplies 

0. Eugene Albright Supervisor of School Accounting 

Mrs. LaVerna W. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian H. Dantley Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. A. Katherine Gross Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Carol3m E. Motschiedler Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Catherine Brunner Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie B. Schmuck Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Daniel Rochowiak Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian H. Ross Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Margaret Freudenberger Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith E. Hale Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Maria Hammond Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jeannette Lewis Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Helen A. Nitkoski Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Calvin Carrington Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ethel Cox Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lenore Dickman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Josephson Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Evelyn Karas Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Florence D. Bailey Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Edith Corcoran Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ethel Hooker Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ida Johnson Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Alma McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Robinson Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Seaborne Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mae G. Cornish Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Audrey J. Davis Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Thelma Peregoy Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Ruth King Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Rosalie Wells Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mary A. Metz Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Florence M. LTdel Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Albert W. Clark, Jr Supervisor, School Building Operations 

Ernest Gambrill Supervisor, School Building Operations 

Edward A. Paris Supervisor, School Building Operations 

Albert F. Hartka Supervisor, School Building Operations 

Louis Kopera Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Elmer P. Jennings Supervisor of School Building Operations 

John P. Loehwich Supervisor, Operating Engineers 

Sampson D. RufRn Supervisor of School Building Operations 

Joseph D. Scanlon Supervisor, School Buildinar Operations 

William T. Dorsey Supervisor, School Custodians 

Jack F. Bocher Supervisor of Transportation 

Vernon H. Bvus Assistant Supervisor, Vocational Education 

Mrs. Ethel Hersbach Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Mrs Mav Richardson R^ional Cafeteria Manager 

Mrs. Evelyn Richardson Regional Cafeteria Manager 

Maurice L. Reilly Business Manager, Cafeterias 

Gustav A. Brandt Senior Administrative Officer, Office Services 

Mrs. Helen C. Starr Head, Department of Home Visitor Service 

Mrs. Barbara Levin Head, Department of Speech Correction 

Lillian Buckingham Head, Placement Service, Guidance Division 

David L. Fisher Assistant in Education and Occupational Information 

Ruth Richards Specialist in Personnel 

Louis A. Sedlak Specialist in Personnel 

Edith Pruss Specialist in Personnel 

Walter M. Miller Specialist in Personnel 



8 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Mary Jane Shapiro Specialist in Reading Analysis 

Charles Cephas Specialist in School Social Work 

Xelva Hobbs Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Eva A. Weisman Specialist in School Social Work 

Dean W. Forbes Specialist in Educational Testing 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Special Education in Secondary Schools 

Frank E. Ensminger Supervisor, Vocational-Industrial Education 

Carl J. White-- Supervisor of Industrial Arte 

Mrs. Katharine Whiteside Taylor Supervisor, Parent Education 

William McK. Rawlings Supervisor of General Adult Education 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education in Elementary Schools 

Louise Young Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Lillian Maith Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Bevans Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sadie Douglass Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Elsie Warrell Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Esther Davis Supervisor, Special Education 

Helen Knox Supervisor of Special Education 

Morton Esterson Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Florence Owings Supervisor of Special Education 

Frank Bennett Supervisor of Safety Education 

Mrs. Eleanora B. Kane Supervisor of Radio and TV Education 

Ambrose Chlada, Jr Supervisor of School Facilities 

Stoyan M. Menton Supervisor, Community Adult Education 

George R. Uchuck Supervisor, Americanization, Citizenship, and 

Adult Elementary Education 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Charles A. Pertsch Senior District Supervisor of Maintenance 

James K. Legg District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Louis H. Reitz Senior Supervisor of Heating, Plumbing, and Ventilating Installations 

Albert S. Valench Senior District Supervisor of School Buildings 

Milton B. Malan Supervisor of School Repair Shop 

Kazmer Grabarkiewicz Supervisor of Operations and Custodial Training 

F. EveljTi Douglass Supervisor, Elementary Physical Education 

Dorothy V. Horine Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Eloise Thomas Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Mrs. Louise G. Rankin Supervisor, Elementary Physical Education 

Leo G. Woods Supervisor, Elementary Physical Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music Education 

Don Regier Supervisor of Secondary School Vocal Music 

Mrs. Alice Rusk Supervisor of Library Services 

Lillie G. Patterson Supervisor of Library Services 

Harold S. Hanson Supervisor, Library Services 

Mrs. Margaret A. Binns Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Abla F. Jackson Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Constance Pawelek Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Eleanor M. Downs Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Alice S. Beer Supervisor of Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Mary G. Lewis Supervisory, Elementary Music Education 

Mrs. Hildreth S. Lambert Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Herbert Stern Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

Anna M. Schone Supervisor of Guidance and Placement Service 

William C. McClean Supervisor of Personnel 

Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Workers 

Paul Yaffe Supervisor of Psychological Services 

Clara E. Grether— _ Supervisor of Research 

Herschel H. Newlin Administrative Supervisor of School Facilities 

Dorothy M. Kell Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Leonard Woolf Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

L. Earl Wellemeyer Supervisor of English, Secondary Schools 

Thomas D. Troy Supervisor of Foreign Languages, Secondary Schools 

Edward Biller, Jr Supervisor of Geography, Secondary Schools 

Zelda B. Brenner Supervisor of Historv, Secondary Schools 

Frank Fairbank Supervisor of History, Secondarv Schools 

Mrs. Edythe D. M3'ers Supervisor of History, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Eunice Bowers Schmied Supervisor, Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

William J. Gerardi Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

S. Leroy Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics, Secondary Schools 

EJra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Sidney Blum Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Robert Buxbaum ^- Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy H. Fader Supervisor of Science, Secondary Schools 

James Francey Supervisor of Vocational-Industrial Education 

James 0. Proctor Supervisor, Vocational Education 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

Mrs. Nellie B. Nicholson Supervisor, Home Economics 

Mrs. Suella Harrington Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mrs. Elaine Nolan Supervisor of Elementary Education 



9 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE CITY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Alice Pinderhuglies Supervisor, Elementary Education 

-Mrs. Gertrude Harwood Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Anne Royer Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Robert F. Palumbi Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mildred B. Blackwell Supervisor, Elementay Education 

Mrs. Peggy C. Nottingham Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Jean Eifert Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Charles O. Connor Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Vashti Jude Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Earl Britt Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Louise Tildon Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anna Cella Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Dorothy Diehl Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Mary Veloso Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mrs. Doris H. Wallace Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs Madessa H. Wallace Supervisor of Elementary Education 

George Bush Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Pauline D. Snaith Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Helga Hermann Supervisor, Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Elizabeth Walton Supervisor of Art, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Norma Millings Supervisor, Art, Elementary Education 

George F. Horn Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Virginia G. Timmons Supervisor of Art, Secondary Education 

Mary Elizabeth McCoy Supervisor of Secondary Physical Education 

Julian Dyke Supervisor, Secondary Physical Education 

Ruth O. Cinsky Supervisor of Elementary Physical Education 

Neil R. Lovelace Specialist in Educational Testing 

Ruby Shubkagle Specialist In Individual Testing 

Mrs. Marjorie Everingham Specialist in School Social Work 

Mrs. Dollie R. Walker Specialist in School Social Work 

Maxwell J. Frankford Specialist in School Social Work 

Chester L. Kiser Specialist in Research 

Martin H. Raila Specialist in Research 

Harry C. Hendrickson Specialist in Research 

Mrs. Margaret H. West Secretary to the Superintendent 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 

Aigburth Manor, Towson 4 

Edward G. Stapleton Superintendent of Schools 

Homer 0. Elseroad Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Joshua R. Wheeler Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Finance 

Morris R. Baker Engineer in Charge of Construction, Operation and Maintenance 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Norris A. King Director of Secondary Education 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

Walter M. Snyder Director of Personnel 

Loyal W. Joos Director of Educational Research and Planning 

Charles M. DeWitt Director of Pupil Services 

Leon E. Grant Director of Purchasing 

Walter M. Gordon, Sr Director of Transportation 

Ralph E. Kessler Director of Special Education 

Preston L. Grimm Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent 

William A. Marshall Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, 

Operation and Maintenance 

Josiah A. Blacklock Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Shirley V. Conner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Gene M. Hastings Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eleanor B. Requard Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Robert W. Gifford Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Margie B. Handy Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Samuel D. Herman . Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Lawrence C. Little Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mary S. Saterlie Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Vincent C. Brant Supervisor of High Schools 

Mary R. Childs Supervisor of High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of High Schools 

Carey K. Sentz Supervisor of High Schools 

10 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Jean O. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

Ethel M. Trover Supervisor of Art 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Nicholas Geriak Supervisor of Music 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

James L. Miller Supervisor of Physical Education 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mildred H. Murray Supervisor of Physical Education 

Paul P. Plevyak Supervisor of Business Education 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Adult Education 

Clarence F. Leisinger Supervisor of Adult Education 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

William A. Odpl Supervisor of Industrial Arts 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Services 

Dorothy A. McGinnis Supervisor of Library Services 

Jerome Davis Supervisor of Special Education 

Gloria L. Engnoth Supervisor of Special Education 

Elliott E. Lapin Supervisor of Special Education 

Gilbert B. Schiflfman Supervisor of Reading 

Margaret S. Farlow Supervisor of Certification 

Charles E. Leiman Supervisor of Clinical Services 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Emma E. Williams Supervisor of Guidance 

William E. Kline Supervisor of Testing 

Louise W. Erlbeck Supervisor of Secondary Nursing Services 

Ruthetta L. Gilgash Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

E. Lyle Root Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Adele D. Woronka Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Willard Strack Specialist in Audio-Yisual Education 

D. Deane Wyatt Specialist in Educational Information 

Helen Huttenhauer Specialist in Publications 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mildred E. Jones Supervisor of Visiting Teachers 

David H. Black Visiting Teacher 

Richard B. Blaine Visiting Teacher 

Amon Burgee, III Visiting Teacher 

Edna S. Congdon Visiting Teacher 

Wanda S. Greene Visiting Teacher 

Therma Lee Harris Visiting Teacher 

John J. Hart Visiting Teacher 

Marie J. Hunycutt Visiting Teacher 

Thomas J. Jordon Visiting Teacher 

Irma R. Kell Visiting Teacher 

Frederick R. Keyton Visiting Teacher 

Eliza S. McDaniel Visiting Teacher 

Vivian S. Mcintosh Visiting Teacher 

Evelyn Maus Visiting Teacher 

Frances N. Osgood Visiting Teacher 

Angelo J. Quaranta Visiting Teacher 

Louis S. Sagi Visiting Teacher 

Helen-Louise Scarborough Visiting Teacher 

Elizabeth Z. Steiner Visiting Teacher 

Mary J. Stoll Visiting Teacher 

Kathryn B. Stonesifer Visiting Teacher 

Delores M. Strauss Visiting Teacher 

Edna T. Warwick Visiting Teacher 

Mary G. Wheeler Visiting Teacher 

John M. Arthur Psychiatric Consultant 

01?a D. Cooper Psycholosist 

Arthur M. Green Psychologist 

Jordan La'ttTence Psychologist 

Gloria M. McDowell Psychologist 

Walter J. Musgrove Psychologist 

Marion H. Pelton Psychologist 

Sheldon K. Riggs Psychologist 

Roger E. Saunders Psychologist 

Ruth L. Sherman Psychologist 

Sheldon 1j. Sliubert Psychologist 

Dorothy Windham Psychologist 

Evelyn C. Norton Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent t 

A. Price Ransone Assistant in Planning 

Allen M. Sutton Assistant in Personnel 

Joe Leckrone Assistant in Personnel 

John Day Assistant in Educational Information 

Mary O. Cookey Library Cataloguer 

•Merle S. Bateman Assistant in Publications 



* Part time 

t In charge of financial work. 



11 



Name Office 
BALTIMORE COUNTY (Cont'd) 

William O. Feader Supenisor of Accountint; 

C. Barry Carpenter Assistant in Accounting 

E. Brian Fleming Assistant in Accounting 

Charles E. Jockel Assistant in Purchasing 

Thomas W. J. Wilhelm Assistant in Purchasing 

G. LeRoy Black Assistant in Transportation 

Fred C. Donovan Assistant in Transportation 

Thomas O. Dunnock Assistant in Transportation 

Grason Fowble Assistant in Transiwrtation 

Karl F. Swem Assistant in Transportation 

Herd S. Eburg . Supervisor of Plant Operations and Maiiitciiaiicf 

Henry F. Schleisner Supervisor of Grounds 

Thomas S. Bowyer Assistant Supervisor, Grounds Maintenance 

C. H. Brown Architectural Assistant 

Edward R. Clemons Assistant Landscape Architect 

Donald F. Custer Assistant Supervisor, Plant ^maintenance 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Grounds Operations 

Charles T. Mahan, Jr Assistant in Real Estate and Records 

Jack L. O'Donnell Mechanical Assistant, Engineering 

Herbert G. Otter Assistant Supervisor, Plant Maintenance 

Edward V. Baker Field Inspector, Buildings 

Howard J. Fleagle Field Inspector, Grounds 

William S. Miller Field Inspector, Grounds 

Andrew L. Bareham Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Charles F. Beyer Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

Edgar J. Price Assistant in Groxmds Operation 

Eugene 0. Winand Assistant in Grounds Maintenance 

H. Erich Koch Assistant in Plant Operations 

William L. Willis Assistant in Plant Operations 

John JIcBrearty Area Assistant in Plant Maintenance and Operations 

LeRoy Schulte Area Assistant in Plant Operations 

Andrew A. Weber Area Assistant in Plant Operations 

Gerald C. Sanders Area Assistant in Grounds Operations 

George E. Souther Area Assistant in Grounds Operations 

John K. Brauer Utilities Assistant 

Karl V. Sloop Assistant in Audio-Visual Aids 

Mrs. Elaine B. Isennock Secretary to the Superintendent 



CALVERT COUNTY 

Court House, Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Douglas M. Bivens, Jr Director of Instruction 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Lloyd J. Falk Supervisor of Maintenance 

* William J. Middleton Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Virginia D. Parran Chief Bookkeeper 

E. Anne Yoe Secretary to Superintendent 

CAROLINE COUNTY 

Law Building, Denton 

Name Office 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Director of Instruction 

Louise C. Dennison Supervisor of Instruction 

Lewis W. Davis Supervisor of Instruction 

Frederick H. Sheeley Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Richard W. Hall Supervisor of Plant Operation 

George H. Caple Supervisor of Transportation 

Bertha L. Miller Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Virginia M. York Secretary-Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Barbara J. Bacsak . Secretary to Superintendent 

Elizabeth Ann Thawley Secretary 

Mrs. Naomi H. Tribbitt Secretary 



CARROLL COUNTY 

County Office Building, Westminster 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Director of Instruction, Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret M. Bailer Supervisor of High Schools 



*Part time. Also serves as teacher at Calvert County Sr. -Jr. High School. 

12 



Name Office 
CARROLL COUNTY (Cont'd) 

John W. Manspeaker Supervisor of High Schools 

Evan F. Bowers Supervisor of High and Elementary Schools 

Ruth E, DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Oharles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

**Mae Prince Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine D. West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

Charles I. Ecker Supervisor of Transportation 

*Philip S. Royer Supervisor of Music 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mary E. Huber Visiting: Teacher 

Mrs. Dolores J. Snyder Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elaine G. Alper Speech Therapist 

Roland F. Haifley Assistant in Custodial Services, School Lunch and Maintenance 

Maurice V. Wolfe Assistant in General Maintenance and Utilities 

Mrs. Martha S. Gilbert OflSce Manager, Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Pauline D. Peterson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Nadine F. Saylor Assistant Financial Secretarv 

Curvin M. Seitz Clerk 

Mrs. Treasa B. Gross Receptionist and Stenographer 

Carole J. Bolland Stenographer, Supervisors' Office 

Mrs. Beverly R. Bosley Stenographer, Pupil Personnel Department 



CECIL COUNTY 

308 Court Hoase, Elkton 

Robert A. Gibson Superintendent of Schools 

Walter J. Finn Director of Curriculum and Instruction 

Edwin B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Richard L. Holler Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Kay Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Norman J. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel E. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

fMrs. Grace B. duBose Supervisor of Music 

Samuel Dixon Supervisor of Transportation 

Louis P. Wright Supervisor of Industrial Education 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mary A. Crouse Visiting Teacher 

Willard W. Taylor Bookkeeper and Financial Secretary 

George Matthews Assistant in Finance 

Dorothy J. Moore Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Adrienne L. Boyd Secretary 

Mrs. Ruth M. Diem Secretary 

Mrs Marie Bruner Secretary 

Mrs. Elaine D. Maners Secretary 

*Mrs Norma George Secretary 

*Mrs Barbara Halligan Secretary 

Leslie Pippin Building Inspector 

Mrs. Rose R. Scheck Elementary Reading Consultant 

Robert Duffey Secondary Reading Consultant 

Mrs. Mary Woessner Speech Therapist 

Mrs. Ruth Craig Audiometrist 

CHARLES COUNTY 

Court House, Charles Street, La Plata 

C. Paul Barnhart Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of High Schools 

Edward G. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Mary B. Neal Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Christine E. Pearson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Georgia B. Lucas Visiting Teacher 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of School Lunch Program and Purchasing 

Warren H. Deyermond Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Julia C. Totten Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Marianne M. Canter Clerk 

Mrs. Hazel J. Gary Clerk 

Mrs. Mary Jane Frere Clerk 

Peggy Lee Garner 1 Clerk 

Mrs. Wilma Grogan Clerk 

Mrs. Qeraldine Lawton Clerk 

Mrs. Ann B. Thompson Clerk 



• Part time. 

*• Part time. Also serves as teacher in Robert Moton Sr. -Jr. High School, 
t Half time. 



13 



DORCHESTER COUNTY 
High Street, Cambridge 

Name Office 

James O. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Charles F. Hurley Supervisor of Hiprh Schools 

Thomas A. Flowers Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

John Armstrong Supervisor of Transportation 

John A. Marshall, Jr Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Mary W. LeCompte Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Dorothy S. Stephens Secretary to Superintendent 

Charlotte J. Cantwell Stenographer 



FREDERICK COUNTY 

115 East Church Street, Frederick 

James A. Senaenbaugh Superintendent of Schools 

Quentin L. Earhart Assistant Superintendent for Instruction 

*Duval W. Sweadner Supervisor of Adult Education 

**Fred J. Bro^vn, Jr. Supervisor of High Schools 

Glenn E. Warneking Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn F. S. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Alice M. Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mary Jane Stokes Helping Teacher 

Janice Wickless Helping Teacher 

Herman A. Hauver Coordinator of Pupil Services 

James L. Fisher Supervisor of Music 

Richard E. Summers Supervisor of Art 

Alice L. Robinson Supervisor of Library Service 

Mrs. Virginia D. Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

* Mary A. Nuce Supervisor of Home Economics 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph E. Rexroad Home Visitor 

Mary M. Fiery Home Visitor 

Mrs. Dorothy Nelson School Psychologist 

Tolbert F. Lawyer Supervisor of School Facilities 

H. D. Williams Assistant in Plant Operations 

William J. E. Null Assistant in Plant Maintenance 

Allen R. Gaddis, III Assistant in Administration 

John E. Tritt Assistant in Administration (Accounting) 

Mrs. Pauline J. Bowlus Secretary to the Superintendent 



GARRETT COUNTY 
Fourth Street, Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Albert R. Ringer Supervisor of High Schools 

A. B. Dean Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Robert R. Martin Supervisor of Transportation 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Margaret S. McComas Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Lucille T. Ludvigsen Secretary to Superintendent 

HARFORD COUNTY 

45 East Cordon Street, Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Howard B. Peters Director of Instruction 

C. Clark Jones Director of Personnel 

George B. Prettyman, Sr Director of Public Relations 

Alfonso A. Roberty Business Manager 

Violet A. Davis Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Helen M. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Jane M. Gent Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Richard J. Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alden H. Halsey Supervisor of High Schools 

* Part time 

**0n sabbatical leave during 1961-62. 



14 



Name Office 
HARFORD COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Annetta G. Wright Supervisor of High Schools 

John R. Walker Supervisor of Industrial Education 

W. Warren Sprouse Supervisor of Music 

Earle B. Wagner Supervisor of Outdoor Education 

James H. Glow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Howard R. Cheek Supervisor of Transportation 

Charles 0. McCullough Visiting Teacher 

Joseph F. Snee Visiting Teacher 

John H. Willis, Jr. Visiting Teacher 

George N. Bollinger Administrative Assistant 

William P. Byers Administrative Assistant 

Edward J. Plevyak Administrative Assistant 

Ralph H. Morgan Building Elngineer 

Mrs. Alice W. Growl Financial Secretary 

Ann L. Campbell Secretary to Superintendent 



HOWARD COUNTY 

7 Park Avenue, EUicott City 

John E. Tingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of High Schools 

Wilhelmina E. Oldfield Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary R. White Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Transportation 

Gilbert E. Miller Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Olive G. Mumford Supervisor of Library Service 

Walter D. Phelan - Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Irene M. Johnson Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Sara S. Snapp Secretary to Superintendent 

KENT COUNTY 

400 High Street, Chestertown 

Reade W. Oorr Superintendent of Schools 

Robert J. Johnson Supervisor of Transportation and High Schools 

Oarey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

**George S. Rose Supervisor of Guidance 

Mrs. Clara M. Chaires Chief Bookkeeper and Clerk 

Mrs. Florence C. Ward Secretary to Superintendent 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
Box 231, Rockville 

C. Taylor Whittier Superintendent of Schools 

John A. Permenter Assistant Superintendent of Instruction 

James O. Craig Director of Elementary Education 

Richard E. Wagner Acting Director of Secondary Education 

Mrs. Elaine M. Barnes Director, Educational Services 

Maxwell E. Burdette Director of Research 

Elizabeth C. Wilson Acting Director, Cirriculum Development 

Mrs. Helen M. Johnson Director, In-Service Education 

William A. Early Director of Personnel 

Paul A. Henry _ Director of Administrative Services 

Lester J, Welch Acting Director, School Facilities 

Brian M. Benson Director of Finance 

Donald E. Deyo Dean, Montgomery Junior Collee-e 

Stanley J. McFarland, Jr. Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 

Thomas R. Peters Assistant, Programs and Reports 

Joseph R. Manno Methods and Procedures Analyst 

Mrs. Dorothy Waleski Assistant for Information and Publications 

Mrs. Mary Walters Assistant Secretary to Board of Education 

James C. Falcon Budget Officer 

John P. Causey ...Assistant Director, Elementary Education 

William B. Evans, Jr. Assistant Director, Elementarv Education 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Assistant Director, Elementary Education 

Robert S. Jackson Assistant Director, Elementary Education 

Theophil K. Muellen Assistant Director, Elementary Education 

Bob R. Nichols Assistant Director, Elementary Education 

♦Part time. Also Vice-principal at Garnett Elementary School. 
**Part time guidance counselor at the Chestertown High School. 



15 



Name Office 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Martha A. Satteifield Assistant Director, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Anne W. Caldwell Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Richard E. Collier Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Etheleen Daniel _ Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marie F. DeCarlo Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Alan F. Dodd Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marjorie E. Jarvi Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Lillian G. Klein Supervisor, Elementary Education 

M. Frances Mitchell Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Mrs. Marion Rockwood Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Elizabeth W. Sutton Supervisor, Elementary Education 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

Robert Schneider Supervisor, Health and Safety 

Barbara Riley Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor of Music 

Chester J. Petranek Assistant Supervisor, Music 

Mrs. Hazel A. Smith _ Assistant Supervisor, Music 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor, Art 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready Assistant Director, Secondary Education 

Philip E. Arsenault Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Marion Beckwith Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Tlionias V. Bilek Supervisor, Secondary Education 

*Mrs. Genevieve Blew Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Sue M. Brett Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Edmund T. Burke Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Kieran .J. Carroll Supervisor, Secondary Education 

William J. Fleming Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Noble N'. Fritz Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Katheriue B. Greaney Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Charles M. Proctor Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Jacob Rabinovicli Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Mrs. Helen L. Kohut Psychological Counselor 

Mrs. Kate C. Kern Acting Psychological Counselor 

Mrs. Cecile B. Finley Chief Psychologist 

William H. Ashbaugh Psychologist 

Mrs. Margaret C. Battison Psychologist 

Mrs. Louisa R. Bilon Psychologist 

Michael A. Deem Psychologist 

Mrs. Viviane D. Durrell Psychologist 

B. Miller Eves Psychologist 

Gilbert Ghitelman Psychologist 

Mrs. Pearl M. Haugh Psychologist 

AValter L. Hodges Psychologist 

Mrs. Ruth H. Linn Psychologist 

William B. Macomber Psychologist 

*Mrs. Theol S. Raskin Psychologist 

Mrs. Blanche D. Rochmes Psychologist 

Mrs. Charlotte M. Simos Psychologist 

Martin W. Spickler Psychologist 

George Usdansky Psychologist 

Ernest C. Young Psychologist 

T. H. Owen Knight Administrative Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Marjorie Van Dien Area Supervisor, Pupil Pereonnel 

Reno A. Continetti Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Robert C. Henley Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

^\"t\vmouth H. Judkins Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Edith Popenoe Area Supervisor, Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Mildred D. Clement Pupil Personnel Worker 

Richard A. Cleveland Pupil Personnel Worker 

Robert F. Fioramonti Pupil Personnel Worker 

Henry J. Giauque Pupil Personnel Worker 

Jewel A. Green Pupil Personnel Worker 

John H. Grentzner Pupil Personnel Worker 

Edward A. Hebda Pupil Personnel Worker 

Ravmond P. Henry Pupil Personnel Worker 

Andrew L. Hugar Pupil Personnel Worker 

Carl E. Mitchell Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Joan H. Peck Pupil Personnel Worker 

William B. Prigg, Jr Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Hope M. Reid Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Geraldine M. Revnolds Pupil Personnel Worker 

Joseph A. Sagneri Pupil Personnel Worker 

Henry T. Shetterly Pupil Personnel Worker 

Harold R. Veit ' Pupil Personnal Worker 

Mrs. Eileen D. Wilkinson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Marie H. Wilson Pupil Personnel Worker 

Mrs. Mary B. Mohler Supervisor, Remedial Reading; 

Samuel M. Goodman Supervisor, Research 

William 0. Scott Supervisor, Testing 



* Part time 



16 



Name Office 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker Supervisor, Educational TV 

Mrs. Sonia P. Brenner Assistant Director, Cirriculum Development 

Hilleary C. RockvFell Assistant Director, Curriculum Development 

Mabel L. McGirr Assistant Principal, Curriculum Development 

William L. Broomall Director, Summer Program 

Rufus C. Bro\TOing Assistant Director, Personnel 

Mrs. Irma B. Dumford Supervisor, Personnel (Elementary) 

Forrest G. Shear in Supervisor, Personnel (Secondary) 

Charles A. Walker Supervisor, Personnel (Supporting Services) 

Gerald G. Reymore Supervisor, Personnel (Certification) 

Robert G. McCord Coordinator, Professional Advancement 

Edward T. Michaels Director, Procurement 

Anton N. Suttora Assistant Director, Procurement 

George V. Menke Director, Operations & Safety 

Leonard J. Offutt Assistant Director, Operations & Safety 

Mrs. Corelli A. David Director, School Lunch 

Mrs. Jane B. Boyd Assistant Director, School Lunch 

Richard M. Ream Director, Transportation 

James R. Shade, Jr. Acting Director, Planning Division 

Gardner B. Jordan Director, Site Acquisition 

James H. Sheldon Director, Construction 

Frank Snyder Assistant Director, Construction 

James L. Mullinix Director, Maintenance 

Reginald J. Crockett Assistant Director, Finance 

Richard B. Grove Assistant Director, Finance 

J. Gordon McDonald, Jr. Director, Insurance & Federal Aid 

H. Douglas Hall Director, Data Processing 

V. Wilson Campbell Director, Accounting 

Ernest W. Snodgrass Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Herbert A. Clark Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Edmund J. Hoffmaster Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Fred Sacco Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Thomas W. Stevenson Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Louise G. Winfield Assistant Supervisor, Secondary Education 

Julia W. Watkins Supervisor, Home Arts 

William E. Feddeman Administrative Supervisor, Industrial & Adult Education 

Leonard T. Oass Supervisor, Industrial Education 

Kenneth Rollins Supervisor, Guidance 

James W. Jacobs Director, Instructional Materials 

Murray L. Andrews Supervisor, Library Services 

Melvin Engelhardt Editor 

Mrs. Mary L. Eckford Management Supervisor, Instructional Materials 

William R. Porter Supervisor, Special Education 

Elizabeth Engle Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Wretha K. Peterson Assistant Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Esther F. Samler Assistant Supervisor, Special Education 

Mrs. Ruth W. Beebe Psychological Counselor 

Wilton L. Kennedy Director, Auditing 

Mrs. Helen S. Joseph Secretary to Superintendent 



PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Elementary Education 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Secondary Education 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr. Assistant Superintendent of Schools for School Planning 

Edward S. Beach, Jr. Administrative Assistant to the Supt. 

Robert T. Novak President, Prince George's Community College 

Margaret A. Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Emma M. Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Eimice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rita M. Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William W. HaU Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leila V. Hardesty Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

A. Mildred Hoyle . Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elisabeth C. Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Thomas Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Stella Spicknall Supervisor of Reading Clinic 

Mrs. Helen H. Brashears Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Nelda Davis ^ Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Glad\-8 Longley Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Bruce Hoak Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Dora Kennedy Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Truman S. Klein Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Howard B. Owens Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Mrs. Mary Snouflfer Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Russell Olson Coordinator of Adult Education Program and the Evening High School 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art Education 

17 



Name Office 
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education and Health Services 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics 

Warren Smeltzer Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Mrs. Louise B. Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Mrs. Marilyn Krummel Supervisor of Music 

Mrs. Frances Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Vincent O. Holochvrost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Rieg Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Frances R. Fuchs Assistant Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Margaret Conant Coordinator of Parent Study Program 

Eugenia Balsley Supervisor of Publications 

Francis Parker Coordinator Safety Education Activities 

Victor Rice Coordinator of Testing and Research 

Stanley Jacobson Supervisor of Psycholoj^ical Services 

Mrs. June Baker School Psychologist 

Betty Howald School Psychologist 

Anne Newton School Psychologist 

Mrs. Martha Odell School Psychologist 

Helen Bowman Helping Teacher 

Ferdinand Cardano Helping Teacher 

Yvonne Moore Helping Teacher 

John A. Woods Helping Teacher 

David Young Helping Teacher 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles Wendorf Assistant Supervisor — Pupil Personnel 

Donald R. Burgess Visiting Teacher 

Phillip Cifizzari Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hamilton Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Jane Hammill Visiting Teacher 

Lillian L. Harvey Visiting Teacher 

Willie Mae Henson Visiting Teacher 

Harry T. Hughes Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Barbara R. Jones Visiting Teacher 

M. Dorothy Jump Visiting Teacher 

Lonnie L. Kisner Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Arlene A. Korn Visiting Teacher 

Otha Myers Visiting Teacher 

Richard A. Myers Visiting Teacher 

Robert C. Nabors Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Charlotte Spencer Visiting Teacher 

Paul Tonetti Visiting Teacher 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Purchasing 

D. Carl McMillen Director of Personnel and Credentials 

J. Howard Skidmore Assistant Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Florence Spicknall Assistant Supervisor of Personnel and Credentials 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Alan Poole Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lorton Layman Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Leon Stout Assistant Supervisor of Maintenance 

Franklin B. Klase Supervisor of Custodial Services 

William H. Smith Senior Building Inspector 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Mrs. Sarah Reohr Assistant Supervisor of School Limch Program 

Mrs. Margaret Young Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Russell O. Eckert Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Anthony R. Miller Assistant Supervisor of Transportation 

Ruth Jefferson Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Helen S. Bowie Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Betty R. Collinson Assistant Secretary to the Board of Education 



QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 
Centreville 



Harry O. Rhodes . Superintendent of Schools 

John E. Miller Supervisor of Transportation and High Schools 

*Mrs. Alberta C. Browne Elementary Supervisor 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Elementary Supervisor 

John H. Webb High School Supervisor 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Marie Shortall Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Frances Rampmeyer Stenographer 

Donna Harrington Stenographer 

Christine Ray Stenographer 



♦Part time 



18 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 



Leonardtown 

Name Office 

Robert E. King, Jr Superintendent of Schools 

James H. Ogden Assistant Superintendent and Director of Instruction 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of Instruction 

Roy E. Pepper Supervisor of Instruction 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Instruction 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Beulah S. Bennett Visiting Teacher 

George S. Kellett Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Elberta W. Hayden Financial Secretary 

Paul T. Hannen Maintenance Engineer 

Howard G. Haverkamp Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

Henry Camp Assistant Maintpnance Engineer 

Purnell Frederick Assistant Maintenance Engineer 

Mrs. Dolores G. Rose Coordinator of Cafeteria Services 

Mrs. Hattie H. Buckler Financial Assistant 

Mrs. Marie B. Burroughs Stenographer 

Helen Marie Owens Stenographer 

Virginia Raley Stenographer 

Doris Tennyson Stenographer 

Sandra Baker Receptionist 



SOMERSET COUNTY 
Court House Annex, Princess Anne 

John L. Bond 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp 

George F. Carrington 

Kermit A. Cottman 

Charles O. Burns, Jr 

Clarence X. Baughan 

Mrs. Alva Bozman Laird 

Mrs. Marian Tyler Colborn __. 
Mrs. Elizabeth H. Murray 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Supervisor of Elementary and Secondary E<Jucation 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Financial Secretary 

Secretary to Superintendent 

Clerk-TjTjist 



Gerald E. Richter 

Arthur R. Higginbottom 

Mrs. Lillian O. Davis 

•Kathleen A. Francis 

Mrs. Virginia S. G. Ritter 

P. Kennard Wright 

Edward E. Motovidlak 

Randolph L. Dunham 

Sallie Ann Yater 

Carol E. Garev 



TALBOT COUNTY 
Washington Street, Easton 



Superintendent of Schools 

Supervisor of High Schools 

-Supervisor of Elementary Schools 
Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Supervisor of Maintenance 

Supervisor of Transportation 

Controller 

Secretarv 

Clerk 



WASHINGTON COUNTY 

Commonwealth Avenue, Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent 

William L. Donaldson Assistant Superintendent 

Russell L. Kepler Director of Operational Services 

Carl M. Mann Director of Purchases 

Douglas M. Bivens Director of Curriculum and Supervision 

F. Richard Crowther Director of Finances 

Victor R. Martin Director of Pupil Service^ 

Carl R, Beer Supervisor of Senior High Schools 

Alva D. Temple Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes . Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

C. Scott Couchman Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Alfred O. Roth, Jr. Supervisor of Industrial and Vocational Education 

Claude B. Brubeck Supervisor of Driver Education and Safety 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

.Tames D. Morgan Supervisor of Testing 

W. Harland Biggs Supervisor of Plant Operations 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Transportation 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch 

*Part time 

19 



Name Office 
WASHINGTON COUNTY (Cont'd) 

Robert F. Lesher Supervisor of Audiovisual 

(■Coordinator, Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

George H. Ropp Supervisor of Instruction (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

Wilbur G. Kelly Engineer (Closed-Circuit Television Project) 

Mrs. Frances H. Machen Visiting Teacher 

John E. McCue Visiting Teacher 

James R. Lemmert Visiting Teacher 

Charles W. Ridenour Visiting Teacher 

Mrs. Lois R. Malott Secretary to Superintendent 



WICOMICO COUNTY 
Main Street, Salisbury 

Royd A. Mahaffey Superintendent of Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Assistant Superintendent 

Harold A. Fulton Director of Instruction 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Carl W. Dumire Supervisor of High Schools 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

H. Victor Keen, Jr. Supervisor of Transportation and Research 

Frederick H. Spigler, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Cora G. Smith Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Charles R. Berry Visiting Teacher 

Joanna Lankford Financial Secretary 

Mrs. Louise L. Layfield Bookkeeper-Clerk 

Mrs. Geneva D. Smith Bookkeeper 

Juanita L. Townsend Secretary to Superintendent 

Mrs. Sally A. Bennett Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Shirley L. Davis Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Frances C. Hinman Clerk-Stenographer 

Mrs. Janice W. Miles Clerk-Stenographer 



WORCESTER COUNTY 

Market Street, Snow Hill 

Paul D. Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

Alfred 0. Hancock Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Louise S. Adkins Supervisor of Instruction 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Instruction 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ernest G. Holland Assistant Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Clinton D. Outright Supervisor of Maintenance and Purchasing 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Transportation 

Elsie M. Dryden . Clerk 

Mrs. Pauline S. Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mary Elizabeth Bowen Assistant Clerk 

Mrs. Arvetta H. Taylor Assistant Clerk 



20 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 22 

Legislation Affecting Education 23 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 26 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education : 

Instruction 51 

Library Extension 62 

Vocational Education 66 

Administration and Finance 76 

Research and Development 79 

Vocational Rehabilitation 84 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 87 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools ... 88 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 89 

Grade Enrollment 90 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools and Classes for Atypical 

Children 97 

Births in Maryland 107 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 110 

Average Number Pupils Belonging Ill 

Nonpromotions in Public Schools 112 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 115 

High School Enrollment : by Subject 123 

Enrollment in Individual High School Subjects 124 

Teachers: by Subject Taught, by Sex, Size of School, Summer School 
Attendance, Certification, Preparation, Resignations, Turnover, 

Source 148 

Costs of Maryland Schools : 

State Minimum Program 180 

Total, Per Cent from State 181 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 184 

Cost per Pupil 185 

Salaries 191 

Transportation 193 

School Lunch, Special Milk 196 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property. . . . 200 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 204 

Parent-Teacher Associations 209 

High School Equivalence 210 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 211 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Community Colleges 220 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 229 

Vocational Rehabilitation 230 

Maryland Public Libraries 232 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 233 

Index 284 



21 



January 1, 1963 



The Honorable J. Millard Tawes 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 



Dear Governor Tawes : 



In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the ninety-sixth 
''annual report covering all operations of the State department 
of education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of 
education throughout the State" for the period beginning July 1, 
1961 and ending June 30, 1962. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 
Baltimore, Maryland 



22 



Maryland State Department of Education 23 

1962 MARYLAND LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION 
Regular Session 
Supplemental Retirement Payments 

Chapter 7, Senate Bill 13, amends the formula applicable to the payment of 
supplementary retirement payments to certain retired State employees 
and retired public school teachers. 

State Debt — Public Community Colleges 

Chapter 22, Senate Bill 41, authorizes a State bond issue of $5,000,000 to 
assist in the financing of capital improvements at the public com- 
munity and junior colleges in the State. 

State Debt — Public School Construction 

Chapter 25, Senate Bill 44, authorizes a State bond issue of $20,000,000 to 
assist in the financing of public school buildings and facilities in 
the State. 

Blind — Sale of Products 

Chapter 26, Senate Bill 52, makes it unlawful to sell products represented 
as having been made by the blind unless the articles have actually 
been manufactured by blind persons. 

Merit System — Registrars and Librarians 

Chapter 28, Senate Bill 56, permits librarians and registrars at the State 
teachers colleges and certain other State institutions who are desig- 
nated as holding faculty rank by their boards of trustees to be ex- 
cluded from the jurisdiction of the State Employees' Standard Salary 
Board. 

State Debt — Washington College 

Chapter 30, Senate Bill 61, provides a State matching grant of $825,000 to 
Washington College for certain capital improvements. 

Schools — Handicapped Children 

Chapter 51, Senate Bill 104, eliminates the requirement that each school 
principal take an annual handicapped child census. Under the provi- 
sions of this Bill, handicapped children will be identified by medical 
referrals. 

State Debt — College of Notre Dame of Maryland 

Chapter 66, Senate Bill 134, provides a State matching grant of $750,000 
to the College of Notre Dame for the purpose of constructing a new 
science building. 

Schools — Penal Institutions 

Chapter 74, House Bill 13, provides for the certification and approval by 
the State Superintendent of Schools of programs of instruction offered 
at the State penal institutions. This legislation is permissive and not 
mandatory. 

State Debt — Hood College 

Chapter 88, House Bill 86, provides a State matching grant of $500,000 to 
Hood College to construct a new dormitory and a new classroom 
building. 



24 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Teachers' Retirement System — Additional Pensions 

Chapter 91, House Bill 91, changes the formula for computing retirement 
allowance for members of the Teachers' Retirement System. Each 
retiree will be guaranteed an allowance equal to 1/70 of his aver- 
age final compensation for each year of creditable service. The bill 
includes presently retired individuals as well as future retirees. 

Employees' Retirement System 

Chapter 98, House Bill 110, (Same as Chapter 91, House Bill 91, except 
applies to the State Employees' Retirement System). 

Public Libraries 

Chapter 122, Senate Bill 79, establishes a local-State guaranteed program 
for supporting current operating expenses of public library programs 
on a per capita basis, starting July 1, 1963, at $1.20. Under the 
provisions of this Bill the State will contribute 30 per cent of the total 
over-all cost. The Bill was amended to provide an increase in basic 
library aid from ten to twenty-five cents per capita, effective 1962-63. 
The local-State guaranteed program becomes effective July 1, 1963. 

Apprentices — Training in Skilled Trades 

Chapter 124, Senate Bill 102, establishes a Planned Apprenticeship Pro- 
gram under the direction of an Apprenticeship Council. The Director 
of the Division of Vocational Education of the State Department of 
Education is designated Director of the Council. The Council is to 
be administratively supported by the State Department of Education. 

State Debt — State Buildings 

Chapter 128, House Bill 2, authorizes the creation of a State debt of 
$22,365,000 for capital improvements, maintenance, and equipment 
in certain State buildings. Funds from this Act are allotted to the 
five State teachers colleges as follows: 



State and County Finance 

Joint Resolution 1, Senate Joint Resolution 1, requests the appointment of 
a commission on State and county finance. 

Longevity Pay Plan 

Joint Resolution 4, Senate Joint Resolution 5, recommends to the Governor 
the inclusion in the 1964 fiscal year budget of funds necessary to carry 
out a longevity pay plan for State employees to become effective 
July 1, 1963. 

Day Care Services 

Joint Resolution 18, House Joint Resolution 7, requests the Governor to 
appoint a commission to study day care services for children in 
Maryland. 



Coppin State Teachers College 

State Teachers College at Bowie .... 
State Teachers College at Frostburg 
State Teachers College at Salisbury. 
State Teachers College at Towson . . . 



$ 103,700 
154,000 
1,551,700 
693,500 
1,706,500 



Total 



$4,209,400 



Maryland State Department of Education 25 
Special Session 

Allegany County — Junior High School 

Chapter 7, Senate Bill 12, authorizes the County Commissioners of Allegany 
County to convey to the Board of Education of Allegany County real 
property for the construction of a junior high school, when said 
property is no longer needed for county purposes. 

Prince George's County — School Bonds 

Chapter 11, House Bill 7, authorizes the County Commissioners of Prince 
George's County to borrow up to $15,000,000 to finance public school 
construction in the county. 

Anne Arundel County — Library 

Chapter 21, House Bill 21, authorizes the County Commissioners of Anne 
Arundel County to borrow up to $382,000 to finance the construction 
and equipping of a public library in that county. 



26 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION AND THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE STATE 
TEACHERS COLLEGES 

August 30, 1961 

The Board was advised that the next annual Maryland Con- 
ference on Education would meet January 11 and 12, 1962, with 
its theme ''How can we improve the quality of instruction in the 
public schools of Maryland?'' The planning committee for this 
lay conference, appointed by the State Superintendent at the 
direction of the State Board, consisted of representatives of the 
State Board, school superintendents, local boards of education, 
Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers, Maryland State 
Teachers' Association, and the State Department of Education. 

Two major professional State-wide conferences for the school 
year 1961-62 were announced with their themes — an appraisal 
of secondary education in Maryland and an appraisal of ele- 
mentary education in Maryland. These conferences were planned 
to highlight the findings and recommendations of the two study 
committees on secondary and elementary education. 

The Board was advised that in response to its request, the 
Ford Foundation, through the Fund for the Advancement of 
Education, was making a grant of $15,000 to the Maryland State 
Department of Education, ''to be used to pay the salary, travel, 
and other directly related costs entailed by the employment of 
a full-time project director who will serve on the staff of the 
Maryland State Department of Education" to develop "plans for 
action based on more complete utilization of the professional 
talent of the public schools of the state." Permission to accept 
this grant was requested from the Governor. 

Approval was given by the Board to the request of the State 
Superintendent to appoint Mr. T. Wilson Cahall as supervisor of 
this special project, effective September 1, 1961, and of the ex- 
penditure of as much of the remaining money as is needed for 
clerical help and other expenses in connection with the project. 
Mr. Cahall, Administrative Assistant at the Board of Education 
of Washington County, has been working with the Ford Founda- 
tion in the educational television program in Washington County. 

At the request of the State Superintendent of Schools, Dr. 
David W. Zimmerman reported on the status of the State-wide 
study of secondary education. The aim of this study, which 
began two years ago, was to design a program for the decades 
ahead. The committee for this study, consisting of superin- 
tendents, supervisors, and principals, had the benefit of outstand- 
ing consultants throughout the nation in considering instruc- 
tional programs at the secondary level. Dr. Matthew P. Gaffney, 
formerly Larsen Professor of Education at Harvard University, 
served as general consultant for one year. Dr. Will French, Emeri- 
tus Professor of Education, Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity; Dr. William T. Gruhn, Professor of Education, University of 
Connecticut; Mr. Harry Spencer, Director of Instruction, Floral 



Maryland State Department of Education 



27 



Park, New York; Dr. Vernon Anderson, Dean of the College 
of Education, University of Maryland ; and Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, 
President, State Teachers College at Salisbury, spent consider- 
able time working with the committee. The committee also 
received valuable assistance from the curriculum and subject- 
matter specialists of the local school systems, colleges, and uni- 
versities. Following are the topics which are included in the 
study: Historical Perspective, Philosophy and Goals, Selected 
Issues, Organization, The Junior High School, The Senior High 
School, Curriculum, Instruction, Pupil Services, Leadership, and 
Evaluation. 

During the school year 1961-62 a tentative document was to 
be reviewed by study committees of the local school systems, by 
the central professional staff of the local school systems, and 
the faculty of each high school. This was to culminate in the 
spring conference of secondary education which was centered 
around the topics included in the study. The study document 
was then to be revised in light of the suggestions from the local 
school systems, printed, and made available for general distribu- 
tion. It was then to be sent to the members of the Board for 
study and discussion. 

The Board received a report on the conference on driver 
education held on July 7, 1961, at the request of Mr. Paul Burke, 
Director of the Maryland Safety Commission. 

The State Superintendent reported that for some time he had 
felt a need for a program which would enable the Department 
to establish better communications with the business and indus- 
trial leaders and organizations in the State in the area of public 
education. As a preliminary step in this direction, staff members 
of the Department have developed an outline survey of public 
education in Maryland. This survey contains a brief history of 
Maryland public education, the constitutional and legal bases, and 
a description of the organization and major functions of the State 
and local administrative agencies concerned with public educa- 
tion. Special emphasis is given to the responsibilities and the 
functions of the State Board and the State Department of Edu- 
cation in providing for public education in this State. 

Working in cooperation with the Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Department in developing a short course on Maryland 
public education which it is proposing to offer in the fall of 1961 
to classes of interested business and professional people. The 
classes will be taught by staff members of the Department with 
resource assistance from educational personnel throughout the 
State. Details of this proposed citizens' course are currently 
being worked out by members of the Department staff in con- 
junction with the Junior Chamber of Commerce officers. The 
course in 1961-62 will run for just one day. 

The State Superintendent reported that under the provisions 
of Sections 305 to 309, inclusive, of Article 77 of the Annotated 
Code of Maryland (1961 Supplement), persons soliciting within 



28 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



the State of Maryland for the enrollment of students in certain 
nonpublic schools located within or outside the State, must 
obtain an annual permit from the State Superintendent of 
Schools, effective June 1, 1961. 

The Board received copies of regulations for issuing these 
permits v^hich had been worked out by the State Superintendent 
of Schools and the staff of the State Department of Education. 
This material had been approved as to legality and sufficiency by 
the Attorney General. 

The State Superintendent reported that two additional public 
community colleges would commence operation in September, 
1961 — the Anne Arundel Community College, utilizing the Se- 
verna Park Junior-Senior High School in an evening program, 
and in Allegany County, a day and evening community college to 
use the building formerly housing the Carver Junior-Senior High 
School. In the first year of operation both institutions were plan- 
ning to offer only transfer programs. 

The State Superintendent reported that two very significant 
pieces of legislation on public community colleges were enacted 
by the 1961 General Assembly. One act legalizes the establish- 
ment of public community colleges and strengthens the procedure 
for State aid for operating expenditures ; the other provides State 
financial assistance for physical facilities for community colleges. 

At the State Superintendent's request, Dr. Harold D. Reese, 
Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education, outlined a study 
which he is making on follow-up of graduates of community 
colleges. When new community colleges are established many 
people become concerned about whether students will be able to 
transfer their college credits to four-year colleges and uni- 
versities. 

During the past four years six public community colleges 
have been started as evening colleges, utilizing facilities of public 
high schools. These are Harford Junior College at Bel Air, 
Frederick Community College at Frederick, Essex and Catons- 
ville community colleges in Baltimore County, Prince George's 
Community College at Suitland, and Charles County Junior Col- 
lege at La Plata. 

In 1959, the first four of the six colleges mentioned above 
held their first commencements and granted Associate in Arts 
degrees to a total of fifteen students, ten of whom were accepted 
at four-year colleges. Seven of these ten received the Bachelor's 
degree along with the 1961 graduates at the following institu- 
tions : Shimer, Mount St. Mary's, Hood, Shepherd, and Towson. 
The eighth one expects to receive the Bachelor's degree in Febru- 
ary, 1962, and the other two are completing their studies at the 
University of Maryland. 

In 1960, the number of graduates of the six colleges was 
forty-three, of whom thirty-two were admitted to four-year col- 
leges, including, in addition to those colleges mentioned previ- 
ously, Florida Southern, University of Baltimore, Frostburg, 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



Morgan, Maryland Institute, University of Delaware (Exten- 
sion), University of Daj^on, American University, University of 
Denver, and Georgetown Dental. 

A question is often raised about loss of credit in transferring 
from these new community colleges to four-year institutions. Of 
the ten 1959 graduates who transferred, seven lost no credit, 
one lost 3 credits, and one lost 4 ; the other individual made no 
report. Of the thirty-two 1960 graduates who transferred, re- 
ports have been received from twenty-two; sixteen indicated 
absolutely no loss of credit, two lost 3 credits, one lost 4, and the 
other three lost in excess of that number primarily because they 
had changed curricula. 

A close follow-up will continue on the success of the 1960 
graduates and will extend to the seventy-five graduates of the 
class of 1961 of the six institutions. 

The State Superintendent reported that for the past several 
years he had served as a member of a committee to study the 
value of cooperative education as carried on at the college level. 
The study was initiated by Dr. Charles F. Kettering, who spoke 
at one of the Department's professional conferences a few years 
ago, and conducted under the general direction of the Thomas 
Alva Edison Foundation, Inc., and the Committee of the Study 
of Cooperative Education. The State Superintendent found the 
study of great professional interest and of import to education 
generally, particularly in Maryland on the high school and com- 
munity college levels. The members of the Board were given 
copies of the report in book form, ''Work-Study College Pro- 
grams — Appraisal and Report of the Study of Cooperative Edu- 
cation." Dr. Pullen added that Dr. George E. Probst of the 
Edison Foundation had already met with the community college 
people in the State and that considerable progress had been made 
in cooperative education in some of Maryland's community 
colleges. 

The Board was advised that the Board of Public Works 
had approved the State Board's request to name the new labora- 
tory school at Coppin State Teacher College 'Trances L. Murphy 
Laboratory School" in honor of the late Miss Murphy, instructor 
in English, History, and Psychology from 1914 to 1936. 

Action of the Board included : 

Adopted the following procedure for hearings on cases 
related to desegregation : 

1. That the State Superintendent on behalf of the Board ask 
the attorneys for both sides in each case to submit one week 
before the hearing a memorandum of law and fact and to 
make provision for reply briefs, if necessary, to be filed 

2. That the State Superintendent notify the superintendents of 
schools involved to be represented, preferably by counsel 

3. That at each hearing the side of the appellant be heard first 

Approved a change in title of Dr. David W. Zimmerman 
from Assistant State Superintendent to Deputy State Superin- 
tendent, effective July 1, 1961. 



30 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Agreed to sponsor a State-wide conference on vocational re- 
habilitation for two days in May, 1962. Mr. Robert C. Thompson, 
Director of Vocational Rehabilitation, stated that such a confer- 
ence is urgently needed to inform educators, employers, physicians, 
other professional workers, and the lay public of the problems 
of disability and the efforts of the State Department of Education 
is exerting to rehabilitate the handicapped. Similar meetings 
have been held in other states with amazing success, and numer- 
ous leaders in the field of disability in Maryland are anxious to 
cooperate in this undertaking. 

Approved inclusion of the following additional standard in 
the Standards for Educatiofial Programs for Preschool Handi- 
capped Children: (Resolution No. 1961-12E) 

J. Experimental educational programs for children who are 
younger than 4 years may be organized, provided each pro- 
gram is approved annually by the State Superintendent of 
Schools. 

Requested the State Superintendent to ask the Assistant 
Attorney General if, in view of the opinion of the Supreme Court 
of the United States respecting the oath that one believes in God 
is unconstitutional, the present oath taken by teachers complies 
substantively with all the suggestions contained in Senate Res- 
olution No. 41. 

Approved the 1963 State Department of Education budget 
requests for Headquarters and Vocational Rehabilitation in the 
amount $3,338,457. (Resolution No. 1961-13E) 

Approved the 1963 State Department of Education budget 
requests for the State Teachers Colleges in the amount of $6,450,- 
226. (Resolution No. 1961-4T) 

November 29, 1961 

The following assignments to Board committees were an- 
nounced for 1961-62 : State Department of Education, Head- 
quarters — Mr. C. William Hetzer; Public Schools — Mrs. J. 
Wilmer Cronin; Higher Education — Dr. Dwight 0. W. Holmes; 
Special Programs — Mr. Richard Schifter; Public Libraries — 
Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole; Advanced Planning — Mr. WilHam L. 
Wilson. 

A resolution adopted by the Council of Chief State School 
Officers expressed appreciation for the hospitality and courtesy 
extended by the State Superintendent and the Staff of the State 
Department of Education during its meeting in Baltimore on 
November 9 and 10, 1961. Recognition also included the Mary- 
land State Board of Education, the Association of Maryland 
School Superintendents, and the Maryland State Teachers' 
Association. Forty-nine of the fifty states and five possessions 
were represented, the largest representation of any meeting of 
the Council which, according to Dr. Pullen, was one of the best 
meetings ever held by the Council. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



The Board was informed that the State Curriculum Center 
located in the Enoch Pratt Free Library Building was now open. 
This is a central depository for reference and circulating re- 
sources useful in promoting curriculum study and development 
and in improving teacher competences. It will serve administra- 
tors in education, supervisors in education, specialists in cur- 
riculum development in education, instructors in teacher educa- 
tion institutions, teachers (through personnel listed above), and 
parent or other groups interested in curriculum study (through 
personnel listed above). The printed and audiovisual materials 
in the Center will be helpful to Maryland educators and lay 
groups interested in curriculum study. 

Action of the Board included : 

Passed the following resolution on the death of Mr. Herschel 
M. James on November 5, 1961 : 

Resolution on Mr. Herschel M. James 

The State Board of Education has learned with deep regret of 
the death on November 5, 1961, of Mr. Herschel Mullinix James, 
Director of Vocational Education in the State Department of Educa- 
tion. 

Mr. James was born on June 21, 1904. He was graduated from 
the Burns City High School in Indiana. He received a B.S. degree 
from Indiana State Teachers College at Terre Haute in 1933 and later 
did graduate work at Pennsylvania State College and the University 
of Maryland. 

Between 1921 and 1939 Mr. James held a number of positions in 
industry. He came to Maryland from Indiana in 1931 as industrial 
arts teacher at the Green Street Junior High School in Allegany 
County. From 1934 to 1937 he taught industrial arts at Allegany 
High School, and from 1937 to 1940 he served as part-time teacher 
at Fort Hill High School and as part-time coordinator of adult educa- 
tion and later as part-time supervisor of industrial education for the 
Board of Education of Allegany County. 

Mr. James came to the State Department of Education in 1940 as 
Supervisor of Industrial Education. From 1941 to 1946 he served as 
Department Administrator of the War Production Training Program. 
He served as State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education from 
1946 to January, 1958, when he was appointed Director of the Division 
of Vocational Education, following the death of Dr. John J. Seidel. 

Mr. James devoted himself to the responsibilities he undertook 
and made many valuable contributions in the field of vocational educa- 
tion. He assumed an active role in both State and national professional 
organizations. 

The Board wishes to express its deepest sympathy to Mr. James' 
wife and daughter and to express publicly its appreciation and grati- 
tude for the services he rendered to the children of Maryland. 

Approved staff changes in the State Department of Educa- 
tion which included : 

W. Theodore Boston .... From Director to Assistant State 

Superintendent in Certifica- 
tion and Accreditation, effec- 
tive December 1, 1961 



32 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Robert C. Thompson .... From Director to Assistant State 

Superintendent in Vocational 
Rehabilitation, effective De- 
cember 1, 1961 

Harold D. Reese From Supervisor to Assistant Di- 
rector of Certification and Ac- 
creditation, effective Decem- 
ber 1, 1961 

James L. Reid From Assistant Director of Certi- 
fication and Accreditation to 
Director of Vocational Educa- 
tion, effective December 1, 
1961 

Elliott E. Lapin Appointed Educational Supervisor 

of Special Education, effective 
February 1, 1961 

Paul D. Cooper Appointed Assistant State Super- 
intendent in Administration, 
Finance and Research, effec- 
tive January 1, 1961 

Dr. Cooper was appointed to the position held by Mr. 
William S. Sartorius until November 30, 1961, when he resigned 
to become Superintendent of Schools of Baltimore County. Prior 
to coming to the State Department, Dr. Cooper had been Superin- 
tendent of Schools of Worcester County, holding this position 
since September, 1948. His experience also included administra- 
tive positions in Prince George's County and principal and 
teacher in Anne Arundel County. 

Professional and personal recognition was paid by the 
Board to Mr. William S. Sartorius. While regret was expressed 
at his leaving, the Board felt that Baltimore County was fortu- 
nate in having him as its new superintendent. 

Adopted a resolution approving the Aid-to-Education budget 
requests in the amount of $107,006,364, making a total Public 
School Budget of $116,800,574 for 1962-63. (Resolution No. 1961 
— 17E) (See Board Minutes of August 30, 1961, for approval 
of Headquarters and Vocational Rehabilitation Budget, $3,338,- 
457 and State Teachers Colleges Budget, $6,450,226.) 

Approved in principle the proposal for the organization of 
research services by setting up a new division. This decision was 
based on a report to the State Superintendent and the State 
Board. 

Dr. Pullen reported that for several years the Department 
had been working toward an expanded research program and 
that the Board in the Budget had given approval to expansion in 
that field. It was felt that the Department must have a self- 
contained division to do research, compile statistical data, con- 
duct studies, and disseminate information on education through- 
out the State in such form that the use of the data will contribute 
most effectively to the improvement of education at the local level. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



33 



At the request of the State Superintendent, Dr. Wesley N. 
Dorn reported that the Department had been working with the 
local school systems on identifying research problems and in 
evaluating statistical services required. He pointed out that 
groups working for the improvement of education felt the need 
for a coordinated approach to research and statistics beginning 
with the use of good data-gathering instruments, the efficient 
processing of data particularly with electronic equipment, and 
organized approach to curriculum and administrative research 
in sufficient depth to be meaningful, and the publication of the 
information in such form that it would be understandable and 
useable by the groups concerned with the problems. He added 
that the proposed organization for research in the Maryland 
State Department of Education was consistent with the 1961 
report of the U. S. Office of Education and with the 1961 recom- 
mendations of the Chief State School Officers. The new division 
will make it possible for all departments to operate at a higher 
level, with more and better organized facts at their command. He 
indicated that many of the problems in education are of nation- 
wide interest and that foundations and the federal government 
are interested in cooperating with state departments of educa- 
tion which have research staffs of the quantity and quality 
necessary to follow through on the research plans they submit for 
financial support. 

Dr. Stanley V. Smith, representing the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation, stated that the trend toward having a separate research 
division to provide service to other divisions has been increasing 
in the last several years. A number of states have created new 
research divisions as a means of getting statistical data and 
doing research on a more organized basis leading toward better 
and faster utilization of findings for the improvement of learn- 
ing and teaching. 

Dr. Pullen added that the Department is thinking not only 
of the work at the State level but also of work with local school 
systems in doing cooperative research. 

The Board of Trustees gave formal approval to a salary scale 
formula and procedure in which salaries for administrators at 
the State teachers colleges would be related to those of faculty 
members. (Resolution No. 1961 — 6T) 

The Board of Trustees took the position that under Sec- 
tion 165 of the Annotated Code of Maryland (1957 edition) it 
has the responsibility for determining the salary and tenure of 
all teachers at the State teachers colleges; that the salaries so 
determined by this Board cannot be reduced by the budget 
authorities. 

The Board of Trustees authorized the five State teachers 
colleges to require applicants to take the American College Test- 
ing Program examination prior to college admission. (Resolu- 
tion No. 1961— 7T) 



34 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Special Meeting — January 30, 1962 

The Board unanimously adopted the following statement of 
policy respecting desegregation in the public schools of Mary- 
land : 

The State Board of Education on May 26, 1954, issued a state- 
ment in reference to the Supreme Court's decision in respect to 
segregation by race in the public schools. On June 22, 1955, the State 
Board issued another statement after the Supreme Court had issued 
its final judgment and decree on May 31, 1955. 

In substance the two statements indicated the unqualified support 
of the State Board of Education in implementing the decree of the 
Supreme Court. The statements declared it to be the will and the 
intent of the State Board: 

1. To "do all within its power to work out the problem 'seem- 
ingly and in order' and in such manner that the rights and 
privileges of no individual are impaired by arbitrary or 
capricious methods." 

2. To analyze the situation and make plans for implementing 
the decision of the Court. 

3. To recognize the fact that "The detailed problems in respect 
to implementing the decision of the Supreme Court will rest 
primarily upon the local boards of education. The problems 
involved in any program of integration will vary among the 
different school systems of the State," but the Board is 
"confident that they will be solved in a fair, decent, and 
legal manner and with good common sense." Furthermore 
the Board is "confident that the local school boards, the local 
school officials, and the parents will settle this problem with- 
out resorting to chicanery or devious methods and with due 
regard for the rights of all parties concerned. Any program 
of implementation will be based upon professional and human 
considerations and not with coercive designs or methods. 
The public school system of Maryland has always been 
known for its high professional attitude and for its unbiased 
and unprejudiced treatment of all children." 

4. To refrain from setting "the detailed pattern of operation 
but to take an official position that the decision will be 
implemented with fairness and justice to all, and with due 
regard for the professional aspects of the program." Further, 
to accept its responsibility "to act in a general over-all 
supervisory nature to insure that standard, equitable prac- 
tices are followed throughout the State." 

5. To recognize the fact that the decision of "the Supreme 
Court of the United States automatically has had the effect 
of abolishing all laws of the State of Maryland which raised 
any distinction according to race in the public school system 
of the State of Maryland and of its local subdivisions." 

6. To abolish segregation according to race "in all of the State 
Teachers Colleges of Maryland." 

7. To recognize as did the Supreme Court that "factual condi- 
tions vary in different localities throughout the State, grow- 
ing out of the formerly established principle of separate but 
equal facilities, now declared to be unconstitutional and 
violative of the 14th Amendment. Such conditions may 
include public school building facilities, locations of the 
same with respect to population density of residential areas, 
transportation problems, teaching staff, and other local and 
geographic conditions if applicable and pertinent to the 
transition from segregation to integration." 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



8. To recommend that ''local public school officials evaluate 
their respective local conditions and problems in anticipation 
of the final decision of the Supreme Court." And to call 
upon "the local public school officials to commence this transi- 
tion at the earliest practicable date, with the view of imple- 
mentingr the law of the land. Voluntary compliance with 
deliberate speed, without the necessity of Court compulsion, 
is advised on the part of all local public school officials 
throughout the State." 

9. To offer the services of the staff of the State Department of 
Education for cooperation with "local public school officials 
to give effect to the law of the land in the process of the 
transition from segregation to desegregation." 

10. To call upon all citizens to "exercise patience and tolerance 
to the end that the law of the land may be implemented in 
the elimination of racial discrimination in the public schools 
of the State." 

In looking back over the State's record in respect to desegrega- 
tion of public schools, the State Board of Education finds much to be 
commended, some hesitation to be regretted, but derives satisfaction 
from the fact that such progress as has been made has been accom- 
plished with noticeably little friction and with little or no bitterness 
between the two races. The State Board believes that this fortunate 
state of affairs has been attributable to the spirit in which local public 
school authorities and local citizens have assumed responsibility for 
the action which has been taken. It is in keeping with the traditional 
Maryland respect for the rights and sensibilities of the individual that 
progress has been made in this field in a truly civilized manner. 

The State Board of Education is mindful of the problems that 
have beset the local school authorities. Although desegregation has 
not moved as rapidly in some parts of the State as in others or not at 
all; nevertheless, the State Board believes that a climate of opinion 
has developed over this period that will make the ultimate transition 
possible with the same kind of spirit prevailing between the races 
where it has been accomplished. 

In the light of its earlier statements, its assay of what has taken 
place in the period between 1955 and the present in the desegregation 
of public schools within the State, and in the light of its own obliga- 
tion, the State Board of Education in meeting duly assembled, as a 
declaration of the educational policy of the State of Maryland, does 
hereby : 

1. Reaffirm the policy set forth by it on May 26, 1954, and June 22, 
1955, in reference to the desegregation of public schools. 

2, Call upon and advise every local school board: 

(a) To initiate and carry out a re-survey of its progress or lack of 
progress in the desegregation of the schools under its jurisdic- 
tion. 

(b) To revise, if found advisable as a result of such re-survey, its 
policies and procedures respecting desegregation in accordance 
with the declared educational policy of the State. 

(c) To confer with its local committees composed of white and 
Negro citizens in re-surveying the present status of desegrega- 
tion and in revising, if advisable, its policies and procedures. 

(d) To guarantee by its procedures that the rights of no child 
be impaired by arbitrary or capricious methods. 

(e) To guarantee that procedures respecting transfer, bus trans- 
portation, and assignment shall apply without regard to race. 

(f) To provide that educational programs and facilities be the 
sole determining factors in the enrollment of pupils. 

(g) To take all reasonable steps to assure that no child be required 



36 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



to resort to hearings and court action to insure his constitu- 
tional rights. 

(h) To provide that all future educational programs be made in 
the expectation of and in the furtherance of desegregated 
schools. 

It is understood that the principles set forth in subsections (e) 
and (f) may be approached "with all deliberate speed." However, any 
delay in the full implementation of this policy statement may take 
place only where a policy is in effect for ultimate, full compliance with 
the Supreme Court's decree at the earliest practicable date. The State 
Board recognizes the fact that the members of the local boards of 
education are representative of the finest type of citizenry in the 
State, and it believes that they can be trusted to carry out the law 
of the land. 



The Board paid personal and professional tribute to Dr. 
Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., who on February 28 completed his 
twentieth year of service as State Superintendent. Dr. Pullen 
is the senior state superintendent in point of service in the 
United States. 

Members of the Board were given a copy of a ''Report on 
Teacher Education Scholarship Program — 1961." Of the 1,128 
students who applied for a teacher education scholarship, 877 or 
78 per cent were placed on the eligible list. The initial offers 
under the program were made on April 7, 1961. The 1961 phase 
of the program was terminated on December 14, when acceptance 
of the final award was received by the State Department of Edu- 
cation. Of the 877 eligible candidates, 726 were offered scholar- 
ships. Two hundred seventy-seven students accepted. One hun- 
dred two scholarships were accepted by candidates from the 
district lists, 34 by candidates from the State-wide list, 141 by 
those candidates who replaced former scholarship holders. 

Following is a distribution of the 277 scholarship awards 
according to the 13 Maryland institutions where the scholarships 
were to be used : 



February 28, 1962 



Number of 



Institution 



Scholarship Students 



College of Notre Dame of Maryland 

Goucher College 

Hood College 

The Johns Hopkins University 

Loyola College 

Maryland Institute 

Mount Saint Agnes 

Mount Saint Mary's 

Peabody Conservatory of Music .... 

Saint Joseph College 

Washington College 

Washington Missionary College . . . . 
Western Maryland College 



35 
8 
19 
10 
29 
28 
14 
4 
5 
, 9 
,33 
, 
,83 



277 



Board members received a copy of the report, "Physical 
Education Programs in Maryland Public Schools," which pro- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



vides salient facts about what is already going on in school physi- 
cal education programs, particularly in respect to contributions 
made to physical fitness, and also points out subtle dangers 
inherent in a narrow ''muscle building" concept. Mr. Herbert R. 
Steiner, State Supervisor of Physical Education, reported that 
President John F. Kennedy early in 1961 established a Presi- 
dent's Council on Youth Fitness. Very soon thereafter the Mary- 
land Legislature also became interested in physical fitness. A 
House Joint Resolution was passed requesting the Governor of 
Maryland to appoint a commission to study the problem of 
physical fitness of Maryland youth and to make specific recom- 
mendations as to how the general level of physical fitness of 
young men and women in Maryland can be raised. The Governor 
subsequently appointed a seventeen-member Maryland Com- 
mission on Physical Fitness. Since September, 1961, the Mary- 
land State Department of Education and the local school superin- 
tendents, represented by their Committee on Curriculum and 
Supervision, have had a considerable amount of joint activity 
with the new commission. 

Dr. Paul D. Cooper, Assistant State Superintendent in Ad- 
ministration and Finance, reported that through the joint efforts 
of appropriate State agencies concerned with economic develop- 
ment, employment security, vocational education, etc., a request 
was made to have certain areas of Maryland designated as 
redevelopment areas, and application was made for grants of 
federal funds to be used for various training projects to retrain 
unemployed persons for employment in other types of work. 

On January 4, 1962, the Maryland State Director of Voca- 
tional Education was notified by the U. S. Office of Education 
of the approval of a grant in the amount of $35,128, under Sec- 
tion 16 of P.L. 87-27, Area Redevelopment Act, for the purpose 
of retraining 240 workers as machine tool operators and elec- 
tronic mechanics in Hagerstown. On January 17, 1962, approval 
was received for a similar grant of $6,950 for training machine 
tool operators in Cumberland. Classes will be conducted under 
the direction of local boards of education in the same manner as 
other vocational programs. The money for both grants has been 
received, and the Governor has approved acceptance of them. 

In a progress report distributed to members of the Board, 
Dr. Wesley N. Dorn, Acting Director of the Division of Research 
and Development, explained that responsibility for both re- 
search and development has been included in the work of this 
division and that the relationships of the Division of Research 
and Development with other divisions within the Department 
and the internal organization of the new division have been 
worked out through cooperative planning. The report listed 
several activities of the division, and Dr. Dorn explained that 
this division will perform a service function working with other 
divisions in the Department. 

Dr. Pullen reported that on July 1, 1962, money will be 



38 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



available from the Act of the 1961 Legislature to assist the local 
school systems in providing driver training as part of their 
secondary program. 

Members of the Board were given a report on the capital im- 
provements program at the State teachers colleges for the fiscal 
year 1963, a summary of which follows : 



College Requested Approved 

Bowie $ 676,000 $ 131,000 

Coppin 468,000 103,700 

Frostburg 1,234,000 1,443,000 

Salisbury 702,800 660,000 

Towson 2,026,100 1,172,500 



$ 5,106,900 $ 3,510,200 

Action of the Board included : 

Adopted a resolution on the resignation of Mr. William S. 
Sartorius who on November 30, 1961, left the Department to 
become Superintendent of Schools of Baltimore County. In the 
resolution the Board noted that throughout his service with the 
State Department of Education Mr. Sartorius demonstrated 
admirable qualities of administrative ability and leadership. The 
Board expressed its appreciation for the services he had rendered 
the Department and the public schools of the State. Mr. 
Sartorius came to the State Department of Education in October, 
1952, as Assistant Director of the Division of Finance and Re- 
search. In 1958 he was made Director of the Division of Ad- 
ministration and Finance and later that same year assumed 
the duties of Assistant State Superintendent in Administration, 
Finance, and Research. 

Approved staff changes and appointments in the State De- 
partment of Education which included: 



Richard K. McKay From Assistant Supervisor of 

Trade Schools to Educational 
Supervisor of Adult Educa- 
tion, effective March 1, 1962 

George A. Myers From Assistant Supervisor of 

School Lunch Program to Edu- 
cational Supervisor of School 
Plant Planning, effective Jan- 
uary 31, 1962 

Robert M. Bassf ord Systems Analyst, effective March 

12, 1962 

Howard E. Bosley From Supervisor of Teachers Col- 



lege Business Management to 
Supervisor in College Ad- 
ministration and Development, 
effective immediately. In the 
change Dr. Bosley assumes 
primary responsibility for the 
school plant planning work 
connected with the State 
teachers colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



Approved the appointment of Dr. Wesley N. Dorn as Acting 
Director of the new Division of Research and Development, effec- 
tive immediately. The State Superintendent reminded the Board 
that it had approved in principle the formation of a Division of 
Research and Development. The Governor's budget for 1963 
carries an appropriation of $154,000 in general and federal funds 
for research and statistics and provides for four additional posi- 
tions in this field. It provides for a title of Assistant Director, 
and this request was made when it was thought that research 
would be kept as a part of the Division of Administration, 
Finance, and Research. Since a separate division has been es- 
tablished, the State Superintendent recommended that the title 
for the person in charge of the division be Director. He recom- 
mended, further, that Dr. Wesley N. Dorn be appointed to this 
position and assume the title as soon as it is provided in the 
budget and that in the meantime Dr. Dorn use the title of 
Acting Director. 

Approved revision of Bylaw 12, Standard rules and regula- 
tions governing public school transportation for the State of 
Maryland, effective July 1, 1962. (Resolution No. 1962— IE) 
Mr. Morris W. Rannels, State Supervisor of Transportation, re- 
ported that the local superintendents' committee on pupil trans- 
portation had been working for several years on revision of 
Bylaw 12. The proposed revision was reviewed and approved by 
the various supervisors of transportation in the State and was 
approved by all the school superintendents at a meeting on Decem- 
ber 14, 1961. The revision is based on recommendations of the 
1959 National Conference on School Transportation in its report. 
Minimum Standards for School Buses, sponsored by the Ameri- 
can Association of School Administrators, the Council of Chief 
State School Officers, the National Education Association and 
several of its departments, and the U. S. Office of Education. In 
commenting on the transportation situation in Maryland since 
he became State Supervisor in August, 1960, Mr. Rannels stated : 

1. Bus crossings over open railroad tracks have been eliminated 
as much as possible. This is constantly under study. 

2. The pre-service training programs are being set up in an 
effort to obtain qualified school bus operators. The goal is to 
have each prospective driver take forty hours of classroom 
instruction and then to have ten hours on a school bus under 
supervision prior to his assignment as a bus driver. 

3. Inspection of school buses has improved tremendously in the 
last year, due basically to the supervisory personnel in the 
local school systems, who are able to give more time to inspec- 
tions. In addition, they receive some assistance from the 
State Police and other organizations which have been most 
cooperative in the inspection of equipment. 

4. According to the State law a sixty-passenger bus may trans- 
port sixty children plus one additional standee for each two 
seats, or a total of seventy children. However, routing pro- 
cedures have always tended to keep the assignment of boys 
and girls somewhere between minimum and maximum load 
capacity. 



40 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



5. There is a supervisor of transportation in each of the local 
school systems. 

6. The only way to eliminate the use of school buses for hauling 
laborers in off-school hours is through legislation. 

7. Equipment complies with the revision of Bylaw 12. 

8. Operating efficiency has been increased as individuals respon- 
sible in the various school systems have made changes through 
evaluation and careful scinitiny of the routing of buses. 

Approved plans for programs to be held in the public schools 
of Maryland during the Antietam Commemoration Year, 1962, 
as outlined in the report of the committee appointed for this pur- 
pose by the State Superintendent of Schools. This committee, 
with Dr. William W. Brish, Superintendent of Schools in Wash- 
ington County, as chairman, was appointed to implement a joint 
resolution of the 1961 Legislature which called upon the State 
Board of Education ''to formulate plans for programs to be held 
in all the public schools of Maryland during the Antietam Com- 
memoration Year, 1962, as part of the State's celebration of the 
Civil War Centennial.'* 

Authorized the Maryland State Department of Education to 
organize and operate a civil defense adult education program in 
accordance with contractual arrangements with the United States 
government acting through the U. S. Commissioner of Education 
of the OfRce of Education, Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare. (Resolution No. 1962— 5E) 

Approved revision of the Standards for Educational Pro- 
grams for Preschool Handicapped Children, as recommended by 
the original committee appointed for this purpose. (Resolution 
No. 1962— 3E) The revision included : 

1. Elimination of all references to Child's Appraisal Profile 

2. Inclusion of a section on experimental programs which was 
approved by the State Board of Education on August 30, 1961 

3. Slight rearrangement of material to permit the General 
Standards to apply to (a) programs for children of ages 4 
and 5 and (b) experimental programs for children under the 
age of 4 

4. Addition of materials to clarify the procedure of applying 

Approved an increase to eight cents a mile for teacher travel 
reimbursement in the home teaching program for handicapped 
children who are residents of Maryland. (Resolution No. 1962 — 
4E) 

Approved a tenure policy for faculty members, Maryland 
State Teachers Colleges, and adopted it as Bylaw 78, effective 
July 1, 1962. (Resolution No. 1962— IT) 

Granted to the State Teachers Colleges at Frostburg, Salis- 
bury, and Towson full authority to award the Bachelor of Arts 
degree and the Bachelor of Science degree to qualified candidates. 
(Resolution No. 1962— 2T) On June 22 and 27, 1960, the Board 
had approved curricular and minimum standards for introducing 
majors in the various subject-matter fields leading to the BA and 
BS degrees. Frostburg, Salisbury, and Towson inaugurated 
programs meeting these requirements. 

Approved the plan for a graduate program leading to the 



Maryland State Department of Education 



41 



degree of Master of Education at the State Teachers College at 
Salisbury and authorized the President to introduce some of the 
courses during 1962, summer session. 

May 31, 1962 

In the annual election of officers of the State Board of Edu- 
cation, Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., and Mrs. Kenneth S. Cole 
were re-elected president and vice-president, respectively. 

The following proposals were made by the Assistant Attorney 
General concerning publication of rules and regulations and 
bylaws of the State Board of Education : 

1. The Assistant Attorney General states that, in his opinion, all 
actions of the Board which it wishes to have the force of law 
should be codified as bylaws. Included in such bylaws would 
be all State plans and any other directives or policies of the 
Board which have mandatory implications. 

2. It is suggested that the publication be separated into two 
distinct sections — one for the rules, regulations, and bylaws 
of the State Board of Education, and one for the Board of 
Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges, since they are sepa- 
rate entities. 

3. It is suggested that all references to sections of Article 77 be 
identified by the short running titles as presently devised for 
The Annotated Code by The Michie Company. Permission 
for use of these titles would have to be obtained from the 
company. 

Each member of the Board was given a few incomplete 
sample pages to illustrate the proposed format. The Assistant 
Attorney General explained that as an administrative body the 
State Board of Education has the powder to adopt rules and regu- 
lations. The historic method of doing so has been by enacting 
bylaws. Since that is the case — although some bylaws by nature 
might not be rules — whenever a rule or regulation is intended, 
it should be done by enacting a bylaw. 

At Dr. Pullen's request, Mr. James L. Reid, Director of 
Vocational Education, reported that on February 27, 1962, the 
Maryland State Director of Vocational Education was notified 
of the approval of a grant in the amount of $11,976, under Sec- 
tion 16 of Public Law 87-27, for the retraining of unemployed 
persons in Oakland, Garrett County. The Governor has approved 
acceptance of the funds. 

Mr. Reid also reported on the Manpower Development and 
Training Act (Public Law 87-415) enacted by the Congress and 
signed into law on March 15, 1962, w^hich becomes operative 
July 1, 1962. This Act provides for the training and retraining 
of nonemployed workers. Responsibility for determining need 
for training and selection and referral of trainees for placement 
after training rests with the Department of Employment Secu- 
rity, under the direction of the U. S. Department of Labor. Voca- 
tional training is provided by the local school systems, in coopera- 
tion with the State Department of Education, under the direction 
of the U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. It 
is expected that nearly $1,000,000 will be available for vocational 



42 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



training during 1962-63 and nearly $1,500,000 for the two re- 
maining years of the Act. During the third year, it will be neces- 
sary for the State to match Federal funds. Plans have been 
developed to start nine projects in Baltimore City as soon as 
funds are made available. Additional projects will start in other 
sections of the State as need is determined. 

Each member of the Board was given a copy of the report 
''Progress Toward Machine Use in the Certification Procedure," 
prepared by Mr. W. Theodore Boston, Assistant State Superin- 
tendent in Certification and Accreditation. 

According to the report, a new certificate form has been 
designed and will be issued to new applicants during the summer 
of 1962. This certificate will be printed by the electronic data 
processing machines available in the State Office Building in 
Baltimore. It is planned that certificates already held by per- 
sons now employed will be reissued in the new form by the end 
of the current calendar year. 

A new application form which serves more adequately in the 
machine processing has also been designed. With the adoption 
of this system, savings in work effort should be realized at both 
the State and local levels. This new program is being put into 
effect with the cooperation of the new Division of Research and 
Development and will also utilize certification data to make pos- 
sible statistical studies that will provide information in greater 
depth about teacher preparation, teacher experience, and teacher 
supply and demand. Furthermore, the relationship between the 
kind of certificate held and the actual assignment in the class- 
room can be determined at practically any time such information 
is desired. 

It is expected that this program will enable the State Depart- 
ment of Education to reduce the time required for processing 
certificate applications, reduce clerical routine in local superin- 
tendents' offices, and furnish the State and local boards of educa- 
tion with pertinent facts about the professional staffs of the 
public schools in Maryland. 

Each member of the Board was given a copy of the following 
"Report on Teacher Education Scholarship Program" : 

Early in 1962 it was discovered that the State Department of 
Education, in following the requirements of Section 284 of Article 77, 
of The Annotated Code of Maryland, 1957 edition, had allocated 92 
scholarships in excess of the apparent allowable number. This situa- 
tion came about because of certain conflicting provisions of the law. 

As vacancies arose, they were filled in strict accordance with the 
procedural requirements of the law and an opinion of the Attorney 
General. And each year the Department certified the appropriate 
number of awards from each county and legislative district, as re- 
quired by law. Since the applicant filling a vacancy must receive a 
four-year scholarship (43 Opinions of the Attorney General 156), it is 
mathematically unavoidable that at the end of the initial four-year 
period there would be more Teacher Education scholarships in effect 
than the maximum number of 608 authorized in Section 284. 

Under the laws it would have been impossible to fail to fill a 
vacancy in light of the express legislative intent. It would have been 



Maryland State Department of Education 



43 



equally impossible to refuse to certify the allowable number of appli- 
cants in a county or district in any given year. The law gives the 
Department no authority or guide for any such denial. Thus by 
reason of this inescapable and unavoidable chain of events, it came to 
pass that a greater number than the maximum of 608 students were 
enrolled in eligible institutions under the Teacher Education scholar- 
ship program. 

The Department at once presented the facts to the Attorney 
General. In his Opinion of February 27, 1962, the Attorney General 
supported the Department's actions under the law and recommended 
that amendatory legislation be adopted at the earliest possible date 
to rescue the Department from its present anomalous position. The 
opinion also suggested that immediate steps be taken to secure pay- 
ment of the deficit for the current year. Actually no deficit had 
occurred since the payments to the colleges had not been authorized. 

Accordingly, a budget amendment to cover the expected deficit 
was prepared and submitted to the Department of Budget and Procure- 
ment. That Department notified the Department of Education that 
approval for the transfer of funds from the Emergency Fund would 
have to be granted by the Board of Public Works. The heads of the 
two Departments then worked out an acceptable emergency administra- 
tion plan for the Teacher Education scholarship program and it was 
placed on the agenda for the April 4, 1962, meeting of the Board of 
Public Works. At this meeting the Board of Public Works authorized 
the transfer of the necessary funds and approved the following steps 
to minimize the excess cost of the program in the 1963 fiscal year: 

1. That scholarships for the 1962-63 scholastic year be offered 
to only 149 persons. These persons shall be the top-ranking 
candidates on each county list, the number of candidates for 
each county being equal to the combined membership from 
that county in the two houses of the General Assembly. In 
the event any of the 149 candidates does not accept the schol- 
arship offered, that scholarship shall not be offered to any 
other person. 

2. Because the cost of the scholarships now in force exceeds 
the legislative appropriation for the program, scholarships 
which are given up by any present holder thereof for any 
reason shall not be considered to create a vacancy and from 
this date until June 30, 1963, no scholarship shall be awarded 
except in the manner provided above. 

At Dr. Pullen's request, Mr. T. Wilson Cahall, Supervisor of 
Special Project, presented a proposal for Program for the 
Better Utilization of the Professional Talent in the Schools and 
Colleges of Maryland." The following six projects were included 
in the proposal : 

1. Develop a State-wide educational television system consisting 
of a combination of broadcast and closed-circuit facilities to 
be used in schools and in the homes for varied educational 
purposes. 

2. Engage as many as possible of the students in teacher educa- 
tion programs in work-study experiences in the freshman 
and sophomore years and place them in stimulating practice 
experiences in the senior year with cooperating teachers who 
have been employed and trained for the job. 

3. Reorganize and staff the campus schools at the five teachers 
colleges so that they might become demonstration centers 
where educators might study the best educational theories in 
actual practice. 



44 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



4. Organize a series of on-going curricular study and produc- 
tion groups composed of a cross section of teachers from col- 
lege and local systems, provide them with special resource 
help, and house them at the several teachers colleges for one 
month each year for five years. 

5. Involve the principals and supervisors in a work-study pro- 
gram for one month each year which would involve the use 
of personnel from teachers colleges. State department, and 
outside sources. 

6. Employ all of the teachers for two additional months in three 
strategically located school systems and engage them in a 
series of well-planned professional programs related to 
improving the direct instruction of all children and youth. 

The first five projects would be State administered, supervised, 
and operated. The sixth w^ould be a combination of State and 
local administered, supervised, and operated project. It v^ill be 
necessary to have the completed proposals ready to submit to 
the Fund for the Advancement of Education by September 1. 
The Board agreed to hold a special meeting on this topic on 
Tuesday evening, July 17, 1962. 

Dr. Pullen reported that the State Department of Education 
and the local school systems have been v^orking together for a 
number of years on the educational uses and expansion of tele- 
vision. The school people of Maryland believe: 

1. That educational television has proved itself; it does have a 
place in education 

2. That there is some virtue in a State-wide organization, but 
each local school system should have its own self-contained 
unit 

3. That a good State program would be of two types: closed 
circuit and open circuit 

4. That the cost should be borne by both State and local govern- 
ment 

Each member of the Board had been given a copy of the 
report, ''Expansion of Educational Television in Maryland." 
Dr. Wesley N. Dorn, Acting Director of Research and Develop- 
ment, reviewed this report briefly. Dr. Pullen suggested that, 
since the first proposal in connection v^ith the staff utilization 
project has to do with educational television, the Board devote 
part of its meeting on July 17 to a more detailed study of the 
matter. Dr. Pullen added that he had already written Governor 
Tawes informing him of the interest of the State Department 
of Education in the coordination of expansion of educational tele- 
vision facilities in Maryland and in submitting a proposal for his 
consideration as to the role the State might play in the develop- 
ment of such facilities. Under the federal law authorizing 
matching funds for the construction of educational television 
broadcast facilities, the Governor may designate an agency to 
assume responsibility for the coordination of educational tele- 
vision within the State. 

The Board voted to request the State Superintendent to pre- 
pare a letter to the Governor asking him to designate the Mary- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



land State Department of Education as the State educational tele- 
vision agency. 

At Dr. Pullen's request Mr. Morris W. Rannels, Supervisor 
of Transportation, presented to each member of the Board a copy 
of his report on ''Survey of Railroad Crossings and Bridges Along 
Maryland Public School Bus Routes." 

The Board was advised that Larry McLean, a senior at the 
State Teachers College at Frostburg, was elected and is serving 
as the National President of the Student Educational Association. 
Mr. McLean, in traveling into many states this year, has served 
well as one impressed with teaching as a profession. He has 
brought honor to his college and to the educational system of 
Maryland. He is keenly interested in professional ethics and 
excellence in teaching on the part of young educators. 

Action of the State Board included : 

Reversed the decision of the Board of Education of Carroll 
County in the matter of the consolidation of the Taneytown High 
School with the Francis Scott Key High School. The decision 
of the State Board of Education is based entirely upon the pro- 
cedure employed by the Board of Education of Carroll County 
in arriving at its decision and in no sense constitutes a substitu- 
tion of the judgment of the State Board of Education for that of 
the Board of Education of Carroll County as to the wisdom and 
advisability on educational grounds of consolidating the above- 
mentioned schools. 

The State Board of Education recognizes the fact that the 
laws of the State clearly impose upon a county board of educa- 
tion the obligation to consolidate schools w^hen in its judgment 
it is wise to do so. 

"The county board of education shall consolidate schools wher- 
ever in their judgment it is practicable, and arrange, when possible 
without charge to the county, and shall pay, when necessary, for the 
transportation of pupils to and from such consolidated schools." 
Annotated Code of Maryland, 1957 edition, Article 77, Section 61. 

The State Board of Education, however, has the legal re- 
sponsibility of settling disputes and of advising local boards of 
education. For the guidance of the Board of Education of Carroll 
Countj^ the State Board makes the following recommendation 
respecting the procedure in consolidating schools : 

1. A local board of education, after it has made careful studies 
of the advisability of consolidation, should present its findings 
and recommendations to the general public. The findings upon 
which the recommendations are based should include: (a) 
the educational advantages of the consolidation; (b) an esti- 
mate of the financial savings or the additional costs which 
would result therefrom; and (c) the safety of the pupil 
transportation required to effect the consolidation. 

2. A board of education, in advising the general public of its 
plan to consolidate schools, should make quite clear how such 
consolidation would improve the educational opportunities of 
the children involved. 



46 



Ninety- Sixth Annual Report 



Approved staff changes which included: 

William L. Barrall . . . Resigned as Supervisor of Finance, 

effective April 30, 1962 

John W. Powder, Jr. . . Appointed Supervisor of Finance, ef- 
fective May 15, 1962 

C. William Anthony . . Resigned as Supervisor of Teacher 

Recruitment, effective August 13, 
1962 

John L. Carnochan. . .Appointed Supervisor of Teacher Re- 
cruitment, effective August 13, 
1962 

Walter F. Edwards. . .Appointed Assistant Supervisor of 

School Lunch Program, effective 
May 16, 1962. Mr. Edwards re- 
placed Mr. George Myers who on 
January 13, 1962, was appointed 
Educational Supervisor of School 
Plant Planning 

Warren G. Smeltzer. .Appointed Educational Supervisor of 

Industrial Arts, effective Sep- 
tember 1, 1962 

Raymond Simmons . . Position reclassified as Supervisor, 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Approved payments made to the Virginia Commission for 
the Visually Handicapped as follows: September 27, 1960 — 
$4,998; January 31, 1961— $4,998; September 14, 1961— $6,748; 
January 30, 1962 — $6,748. Also authorized the signing of a new 
continuing agreement with the Virginia Commission for the 
Visually Handicapped, effective July 1, 1962. (Resolution No. 
1962— 8E) 

In this connection Miss Nettie B. Taylor, Director of Li- 
brary Extension, reported that since July, 1958, blind persons in 
Maryland have had access to special library services primarily 
through the contract of the Maryland State Board of Education 
with the Virginia Commission for the Visually Handicapped in 
Richmond, Virginia. The contract provides that the Virginia 
Commission shall furnish library materials and services to 
eligible blind residents of Maryland on the same basis that it 
provides services to Virginia residents. The services have con- 
sisted of the lending of ''talking books" (recordings) and re- 
corded periodicals by free mail service to individual blind read- 
ers. Record players are supplied through the Maryland Workshop 
for the Blind. Books and other materials in Braille are supplied 
directly by the Library of Congress. The Library of Congress 
also supplies the talking book recordings and machines to the 
State and regional agencies who then lend them to blind readers. 

The library service of the Virginia Commission of the 
Visually Handicapped operates on a budget of approximately 
$37,000, of which, for 1962-63, $11,489 will be paid by Maryland. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



The total number of Maryland readers served in 1961-62 was 708. 
The number of users of the service and number of materials 
borrowed have increased consistently over the four-year period, 
as has the collection of books and periodicals available. Plans and 
activities are now under way to improve library services. 
Through a special appropriation in 1961-62 of $3,500 from Mary- 
land and an equal amount from Virginia, the Virginia Commis- 
sion has purchased tape-recording equipment and a large quan- 
tity of tape to be used in providing books on tape to blind readers 
as a supplementary service to the regular program. The librar- 
ian also plans to maintain more consistent contact with readers 
through the issuance of a periodic newsletter. Changes in the 
arrangement and handling of the collection are being made in 
order to facilitate services. 

At a meeting of the Advisory Committee in Richmond on 
May 4, 1962, Mr. Robert Bray, Chief, Division for the Blind, 
Library of Congress, expressed his satisfaction at the operation 
of the Maryland- Virginia service. Mr. Douglas McFarland, Di- 
rector of the Virginia Commission, is interested in a thorough 
study of the service and emphasized again his feeling that the 
provision of library services jointly by the two States was a more 
satisfactory, efficient, and economical operation than either could 
carry on alone. There was general agreement on the terms of 
the contract for renewal and a mutual desire to continue the 
present arrangement. 

Dr. Cooper then explained that in 1958 the State Board of 
Education approved the signing of an agreement with the State 
of Virginia for the purpose of providing library services for the 
visually handicapped for the two states on a regional basis. This 
contract covered the period from July 1, 1958, through June 30, 
1960. In 1958-59 and 1959-60 Maryland contributed each year 
to this program. Apparently it was assumed that this was a con- 
tinuing or self-renewing contract, for the Department continued 
to make provision in the budget after 1960 for this program. The 
budget requests were approved and expenditures made. The 
Attorney General's office recently advised the Assistant State 
Superintendent in Administration and Finance that the State 
Board does have a contract, even though the original agreement 
expired as of June 30, 1960. However, the Assistant Attorney 
General is preparing a new agreement with the Virginia Com- 
mission for the Visually Handicapped to become effective July 
1, 1962. 

Authorized the Secretary of the State Board of Education 
to sign a new continuing agreement with the Virginia Com- 
mission for the Visually Handicapped, effective July 1, 1962. 
(Resolution No. 1962— 8E) 

Authorized the State Superintendent, beginning July 1, 
1962, to ascertain the total number of different students en- 
rolled in driver education in each of the subdivisions along with 
the amount of instruction time in class and behind the wheel for 



48 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



each student, calculate the equivalent number of students receiv- 
ing 30 hours of classroom instruction and six hours behind-the- 
wheel instruction, and apportion and distribute the funds avail- 
able among the subdivisions on the basis of this equivalent 
number of students. This resolution is in force only until 
August 31, 1962. (Resolution No. 1962— 9E) 

Dr. Pullen stated that, as previously reported to the Board, 
the General Assembly in 1961 enacted legislation increasing the 
fee for a motor vehicle instruction and examination permit 
from $1.00 to $5.00, of vv^hich $4.00 is to be paid into a special 
fund to be used by the State Department of Education to provide 
for driver education in the public high schools. From $500,000 to 
$600,000 will be available for distribution from this fund as of 
July 1, 1962. The State Department of Education is required to 
apportion the revenues in the fund to the various subdivisions 
on the basis of the number of students enrolled in the driver 
training program. 

For the school year 1961-62, the subdivisions are spending 
$541,254 to conduct programs in driver education. Next year 
they propose to spend $915,986. Some of these programs are 
offered entirely within school hours, some entirely out of school 
hours, and there are various combinations of the two. The 
student time devoted to driver training also varies considerably 
among the subdivisions. 

After discussion with the school superintendents and the 
Assistant Attorney General, the State Superintendent recom- 
mended that the State Department of Education apportion the 
revenues from the Driver Education Fund on the basis of the 
number of students enrolled in driver education. Since there 
is variation in the kinds of programs and extent of training 
offered, the ''number of students enrolled" shall be determined 
by converting the total number of students taking driver train- 
ing to an equivalent number taking a program of 30 hours class 
instruction and six hours behind-the-wheel instruction, and this 
equivalent number shall be the basis for apportionment. 

It is further recommended that these funds be made avail- 
able for conducting driver education programs on Saturdays, 
during the summer, or in the evening, but this does not preclude 
the use of any excess or the full amount for programs conducted 
during school hours. 

Attention is called to the fact that the funds available rep- 
resent only about 50 per cent of the cost of the program antici- 
pated for next year and about 20 per cent of the cost of a 
minimum program for all eligible students. Also, in some sub- 
divisions where programs are offered during school hours, the 
instructors required may be taken from the number allotted 
for the minimum program and thus adversely affect other pro- 
gram offerings. Therefore, it is further recommended that the 
Board instruct its appropriate committee to meet with members 
of the Department to develop a proposal for a special allotment 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



of teachers for driver education to be considered later by the 
Board for inclusion in Bylaw 74 and thus financed under the 
minimum program. 

While money in excess of the amount required for the out- 
of-school program would be available for this from the special 
Driver Education Fund and other excess funds might become 
available, it is anticipated that this last recommendation may 
require additional budget appropriation and thus it might not 
be possible to effect it until the adoption of the next budget. 
The recommendation here, then, is that the principle of support 
for instruction in driver education as a part of the minimum 
program be approved. 

Requested its Committee on Public Schools to meet with 
appropriate members of the State Department of Education to 
prepare a special staff allotment for driver-training teachers in 
the high schools, which proposed staff allotment shall be later 
considered by the Board for the purpose of amending Bylaw 74, 
Ratio of high school teachers to pupils enrolled. (Resolution 
No. 1962— lOE) 

Approved a procedure for the administration of the General 
Public Junior or Community College Construction Loans of 1961 
and 1962. (Resolution No. 1962— HE) 

Authorized the State Department of Education to allow 
$25.00 per three-hour session for instruction in seminars in 
liberal adult education, effective during 1961-62. (Resolution 
No. 1962— 12E) 

Approved the 1964-68 capital improvements budget in the 
amount of $26,779,500, which includes sub-budget totals for 
each of the five State teachers colleges as follows: Bowie, 
$2,861,200; Coppin, $2,789,000; Frostburg, $8,058,300; Salis- 
bury, $2,806,000; Towson, $10,265,000. (Resolution No. 1962— 
5T) 

Authorized the State Superintendent of Schools to proceed 
with the establishment of a centralized Student Loan Collection 
procedure, with additional personnel to be provided for the 
Department. (Resolution No. 1962— 6T) 

Authorized each of the five State teachers colleges to offer, 
where feasible, late afternoon and evening classes within the 
general framework of the curricula approved for the college in 
question. (Resolution No. 1962 — 7T) 

Approved the use of facilities at the five State teachers 
colleges as fallout shelters if and when requested by the appro- 
priate civil defense authorities. (Resolution No. 1962 — 8T) 

Approved the introduction of majors in Economics, German, 
Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Russian, Sociology, 
and Speech and Drama at the State Teachers College at Frost- 
burg as soon as the College has appropriate faculty, physical 
facilities, and library resources. (Resolution No. 1962 — 9T) 

Approved a proposal for the establishment of an off -campus 



50 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



study center in Montgomery County to be conducted by Frost- 
burg State Teachers College. 

Voted to recommend to the Board of Public Works, which 
has final authority in the naming of public buildings in the State, 
that the three new buildings soon to be completed at the State 
Teachers College at Frostburg be dedicated to the following 
individuals : 

Dormitory — Dr. Ivan C. Diehl, Dean of Instruction at the 
College 

Library — Mr. Jerome Framptom, Jr., President of the State 
Board of Education and Board of Trustees of the State 
Teachers Colleges 

Science Building — The Honorable J. Millard Tawes, Gover- 
nor of the State of Maryland 

It has been the policy at Frostburg in the past to recognize 
certain persons who have made contributions to public education 
and especially to the State Teachers College at Frostburg by 
naming buildings for them. Each of these three individuals 
has made a contribution to the college and to the State, and the 
Board felt it was fitting to acknowledge it in this way. 

Voted to request the Attorney General's office to draft a 
bill to be presented by the Board of the Legislative Council, chang- 
ing the names of all the present State teachers colleges to 
eliminate the word "teachers." This was in accordance with 
earlier action of the Board which favored such a change. 

Adopted a resolution which approved the introduction of 
a major in Music Education at the State Teachers College at 
Towson in September, 1962. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



division of instruction 

State-wide Studies and Conferences 

The rapidly changing nature of national and international 
affairs in recent years is presenting to education a continuing 
challenge of major proportions. The State Department of Edu- 
cation undertook to meet this challenge on a broad front in 
1959 when a comprehensive re-examination of public education 
was initiated. This was seen as a cooperative project involving 
representatives of all twenty-four local school systems in exten- 
sive reviews of policies, programs, and standards at both ele- 
mentary and secondary levels. All members of the Division of 
Instruction have participated actively in these studies, the status 
of which is reported below for the year 1961-62. 

Released in preliminary form in the spring of 1961, the bulle- 
tin entitled Public Secondary Education in Maryland — Policies 
and Programs focused upon those aspects of the secondary school 
program dealing most directly with instruction. It became for 
the year the major subject of critical analysis and in-service 
education for all those interested in secondary education across 
the State. Following its formal presentation to the local superin- 
tendents at their fall meeting in Ocean City, local staff personnel 
and high school faculties in the twenty-three counties and Balti- 
more City considered it critically during the next several months. 
The Annual Maryland Conference on Secondary Education held 
on March 22-23, 1962, represented the culminating activity in 
the review process for this bulletin. Within the theme 'Tublic 
Secondary Education in Maryland — A Design for the Decade 
Ahead/' group assemblies at this Conference gave final con- 
sideration to the contents of each section of the report. 

A second phase of study at the secondary level which had 
begun in the spring of 1961 was continued during 1961-62. A 
committee of fifteen, including local superintendents, supervisors, 
principals, and members of the Department staff, explored fur- 
ther the modifications to be made to high school standards in the 
light of the above policy revisions and other conditions of the 
times. Drawing upon the resources of the U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion, the National Association of Secondary School Principals, 
other state departments of education, and from the literature in 
the field, the committee made a serious effort to develop for 
itself a working understanding of both current practice and 
research. Consultant service to this end was secured from Dr. 
David Austin of Teachers' College, Columbia University, and 
on a more frequent basis from Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, President 
of the State Teachers College at Salisbury. 

In line with the Department's responsibility to provide 
through cooperative effort a common direction for public educa- 
tion in Maryland, a State-wide study of the elementary school 
was initiated in March, 1961. Under the direction of a small 
State planning committee, with Dr. David W. Zimmerman as 



52 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Chairman and Mrs. Grace A. Dorsey as Secretary, the purpose 
and scope of the study were outlined and submitted to local 
school systems for suggestions and comments. The revised out- 
line became the basis for the work to be done in developing a 
policy bulletin for the State. Such a bulletin may be used by 
local school systems in evaluating, interpreting, or revising the 
elementary school program. Through the first full year of the 
study the following progress may be noted : 

1. A State-wide coordinating committee has been appointed. 

2. All local school systems have been involved. 

3. Reports from local committees have been submitted for study 
and review by the coordinating committee. 

4. Much use has been made of specialists and consultants. 

5. The study has provided a means for a rich in-service educa- 
tion program for the hundreds of local staff personnel in- 
volved. 

The scope of the study is indicated by the topics being 
treated. These include : philosophy and goals, factors influencing 
elementary education, the program of the school, organizing 
for learning, staffing the elementary school, meeting varied 
needs of children, relationships with parents and community, 
providing an effective environment for learning, some present 
challenges, and evaluating the work of the school. 

The Annual Maryland Conference on Elementary Education, 
which was held April 12-13, 1962, had as its theme ''The Mary- 
land Elementary School Study — Directions for the Future." 
This major activity not only provides an opportunity to hear 
eminent authorities in their respective fields but also allows some 
treatment in depth of special aspects of elementary education. 
This year's annual conference stressed in the four major as- 
semblies directions in meeting the unique needs of children, 
in staffing the elementary school, in evaluating the elementary 
school program, and in providing an effective environment for 
learning. 

Supervisory Assistance to Local School Systems 

Supervisory assistance to local school systems continues to 
be a major activity of both the general supervisor and the special 
program supervisor. These services may vary from system to 
system but in general they fall under certain major categories: 

1. Assist in the development of curriculum materials for use 
in local schools: 

a. Work in the social studies curriculum was carried on in the 
following systems: Caroline, Dorchester, Howard, Kent, 
Queen Anne's, and Wicomico. 

b. Science programs received emphasis and help in the num- 
ber of counties, notably Carroll, Frederick, and St. Mary's. 

c. English, business education, mathematics, and music re- 
ceived special attention in one or more local school systems 
during the year. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



Plan and coordinate in-service programs for teachers. 

The major in-service program during the year was in the 
area of mathematics. This program has been in progress for 
two years and is a cooperative project involving several mem- 
bers of the Division and the local school systems. Specifically 
two major approaches have been undertaken: 

a. Summer workshops in mathematics for elementary teach- 
ers — In the summer of 1961 seven such workshops were 
held in Salisbury, Cambridge, Ellicott City, Westminster, 
Cumberland, Mechanicsville, and Frederick. More than 650 
teachers attended these workshops. Specific activities in- 
cluded providing consultants, meeting with consultant and 
supervisors to arrange the program, attending the work- 
shops, evaluating the results, and making plans for further 
work. 

b. In-service program in mathematics on television in Salis- 
bury — This program was broadcast to teachers in Worces- 
ter, Wicomico, Somerset, and Caroline counties. Specific 
activities included getting a consultant in mathematics to 
telecast the program, visiting schools to observe the pro- 
gram, and meeting with teachers to discuss the program 
and to evaluate the procedures used. Television promises 
to be a very valuable medium for in-service education of 
teachers. It is planned to continue this program next year. 

Visit schools and classrooms with the local supervisors. 

During the year the State supervisors visited schools and 
classrooms throughout the State, usually upon invitation of 
the local superintendent and supervisor, for such specific 
purposes as follows: 

a. To study and evaluate newer developments in team teach- 
ing, the ungraded primary plan, and departmentalization 
in the upper elementary grades. 

b. To appraise a special aspect of the program of a school 
or a county, e.g., individualized reading, social studies, 
music, out-door education, and science. 

c. To assist the principal in organizing and programing his 
high school in evaluation procedures, including Middle 
States accreditation, and in improved staff utilization. 

d. To work with local supervisors in programs to improve 
the teaching-learning situation. The role of the State 
supervisor is changing; it is no longer practical or desira- 
ble for State supervisors to spend a major portion of their 
time in working with individual classroom teachers. One 
State supervisor planned a program cooperatively with the 
elementary supervisors of three counties to improve the 
teaching of reading in grades 1-8 for a three-year period, 
1959-1962. The State Department cooperated with the 
local school systems in employing a consultant to conduct 
3 three-day meetings each year. 

Attend and participate in professional meetings conducted by 
local school systems. 

These meetings are a most important phase of the super- 
visor's work and demand considerable time, especially when 
speeches have to be made on a variety of topics or when 
specific topics are assigned for discussion. Assistance in the 
selection of consultants for these meetings is an invaluable 
sei-vice of the State supervisors. 

Coordinate and provide leadership to various State commit- 
tees. 

The Division, through the high school supervisor, worked 
with the English specialists throughout the State in developing 



54 Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 

and coordinating programs designed to improve the teaching 
of high school English. 

Members of the Division worked with specialists in the so- 
cial studies to develop a policy statement on "Strengthening 
Democracy Through Education — Meeting the Challenge of 
Communism and Other Conflicting Ideologies." Other major 
activities include working membership on the following com- 
mittees: The Committee on the Highly Able; The Committee 
on Adult Education; The Curriculum Coordinating Commit- 
tee; The Family Life Education Committee; and The State 
Committee on Secondary Schools of the Middle States Asso- 
ciation. 



Consultative Services to Nonpublic Schools 

The high school supervisory staff works with the Division of 
Certification and Accreditation in visiting, for purposes of 
evaluation and approval, nonpublic secondary schools in the 
State which require or request such approval. The work in this 
area continues to grow as nonpublic schools increase in number 
and size. 

Curriculum Materials and Improvement 

The major developments and activities in the area of cur- 
riculum improvement and materials included : 

1. The opening of the State Curriculum Center located in the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore, under a cooperative 
arrangement with the latter for certain special services. 

2. The preparation of a brochure outlining the policies and serv- 
ices of the Center and an audiovisual catalog giving an anno- 
tated description of the materials available to schools from the 
Center. 

3. The publication and distribution of the fourth book of the 
Conservation Series, Maryland's Rocks and Minerals. The 
purpose of this series is to provide authentic and attractive 
resource materials available to teachers and pupils through- 
out the State. A color filmstrip with a record and sets of 2" 
X 2" color slides were developed to supplement the use of this 
publication in the classroom. 

4. The supervisor of curriculum is working with other Division 
personnel and the State Department of Employment Security 
to produce a filmstrip on the potential school drop-out. 

5. A three-day audiovisual preview was held to evaluate 
materials for representatives of local school systems and for 
possible purchase for use in the Curriculum Center. The State 
Coordinating Curriculum Committee provides leadership in 
the evaluation and selection of curriculum materials for local 
use. 

6. A State Committee to consider the feasibility of regional 
curriculum resource centers in Maryland was appointed by 
the State Superintendent of Schools. 

7. A major revision of the 24-volume Maryland Portfolio Series 
was completed to keep these materials up-to-date and avail- 
able to the schools. 

The supervisors of curriculum continue to provide consulta- 
tive services to local schools at both elementary and secondary 



Maryland State Department of Education 55 



levels in curriculum workshops, in-service programs, evaluation 
programs, and selection of science and other equipment and 
materials. 

Program Improvements in Mathematics, Science, 
AND Modern Foreign Languages 

The year 1961-62 marked the completion of the original 
four-year National Defense Education Act program initiated in 
1958. This program specifically provides ^'financial assistance for 
strengthening science, mathematics, and modern foreign lan- 
guage instruction." 

The Maryland State Department of Education participates 
in two of the authorized programs : 

a. A program of grants to State educational agencies for projects 
of local educational agencies for the acquisition of laboratory 
or other special equipment for science, mathematics, or modern 
foreign language teaching in public elementary and secondary 
schools and for minor remodeling of laboratory or other space 
to be used for such equipment 

b. A program of grants to State educational agencies for ex- 
pansion or improvement of supervisory or related services in 
public elementary and secondary schools in science, mathe- 
matics, and modern foreign language instruction and for 
administration of State programs 

In program a, the acquisition program, local educational 
agencies (the counties and Baltimore City) submitting projects 
approved by the State Department of Education are reimbursed 
50 per cent on the total of such projects from Federal funds. 
The remaining 50 per cent is paid by the local school systems. 

Program b consists of administrative, supervisory, and re- 
lated services all conducted at the State level. A 50 per cent 
reimbursement on the expenditures of the program is made from 
Federal funds, the balance from State funds. 

The following information will provide some idea of the 
operation of Title III each year : 

Federal-Local Federal-State Total 



Year (Program a) (Program b) (a -f- b) 



1958- 59 $ 28,740 *$ 9,604 $ 38,344 

1959- 60 1,156,603 39,146 1,195,749 

1960- 61 1,296,582 33,018 1,329,600 

1961- 62 1,370,500 54,868 1,425,368 



Totals $ 3,852,425 $136,636 $ 3,989,061 



* Entirely Federal. 

From the above data it can be seen that Title III of NDEA 
in its first four years of operation involved a $3,989,061 pro- 
gram for the strengthening of science, mathematics, and modern 
foreign languages in Maryland. 

The $136,636 — Federal-State shared portion for administra- 



56 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



tive, supervisory, and related programs accounts for 3.4 per cent 
of the total program. This percentage provides not only for ad- 
ministrative costs but for valuable State supervisory consultant 
and related services which previously did not exist. In the 
Federal-local program, foreign languages accounted for 15.1 per 
cent; mathematics, 9.1 per cent; and science, 72.4 per cent of the 
total four-year expenditure. 

Federal-local expenditures (column I) provide for increased 
acquisition of specialized instructional equipment for science, 
mathematics, and modern foreign languages in every local 
school system of the State. 

New^ laboratories and new equipment are made available 
for better instruction and greater student participation in 
science. Additional equipment is made available for better 
mathematics instruction. New language laboratories provide 
for effective audio-lingual instruction in foreign languages. 
Audio-visual equipment and pertinent reference materials are 
available in all three areas. All areas of the State have benefited 
in this respect and the total school program (grades 1-12) has 
been involved. 

Federal-State expenditures (column II) are providing, in 
addition to actual administrative costs of the total program, a 
variety of essential services for strengthening instruction. 

Specialized supervisory, consultant, and related services are 
available in science, mathematics, and modern foreign languages 
to all areas of the State. For the first time, special subject mat- 
ter supervisors are available at the State level to provide specific 
help and guidance to instructional programs in these areas. 

Related services are providing for the development of new 
instructional materials for audio-lingual instruction in modern 
foreign languages. Manuals and tapes have been produced to 
provide for a four-year sequence in French and a two-year 
sequence in Spanish. 

New and expanded opportunities for in-service training are 
also being provided in this phase of the program. In-service 
workshops and conferences to acquaint teachers better with new 
developments and to train them in new skills are being con- 
ducted in all three subject areas. In the summer of 1962, for 
example, more than 750 teachers were trained in newer develop- 
ments in mathematics in a series of eight two-week workshops. 

NDEA Title V-A — Guidance, Counseling, Testing 

Local school systems continued to utilize the major portion 
of Federal funds received under Title V in supplementing guid- 
ance staffs, both counselors and clerks, and for the purpose of 
maintaining and extending effective services to secondary stu- 
dents. More than 95 per cent of the money allocated was used 
in this manner. A little more than 4 per cent of the remaining 
funds was disbursed for guidance materials, equipment, testing, 
and State supervision. 



Maryland State Department of Education 57 

Several current developments in State-wide testing pro- 
grams have particular significance for instruction, guidance, and 
administration. Present trends are toward : 

1. The use of percentiles and standard scores in lieu of I.Q. and 
grade equivalent scores 

2. The measurement of broad skills and developed abilities 
directly related to success in future study 

3. The measurement of abilities such as verbal, mathematical, 
and scientific in assessing the academic potential of secondary 
school students 

4. More comprehensive test batteries which provide measures of 
several abilities, especially reading 

5. Greater attention to in-service education of teachers and 
counselors in use of test results 

6. Careful consideration of the place of external testing pro- 
grams, such as the National Merit and others, in relation to 
the regular testing program 

Pupil Services 

In an attempt to best meet the needs of pupils today these 
trends may be noted : 

1. Organization of pupil services as an administrative unit. In 
the large local school systems a director of pupil services has 
administrative responsibility for the total program. In the 
smaller systems the supervisors of pupil personnel are in- 
creasingly assuming this responsibility. 

2. Decentralization in the administrative organization. Area 
offices have been established in several of the local school 
systems in an attempt to provide more effective service to 
school personnel, pupils, and parents. 

3. Continuing emphasis on the leadership role of the local super- 
visor. Local supervisors carry ever-increasing responsibility 
in areas of program development, implementation, and inter- 
pretation. 

4. Continuing emphasis on coordination of all pupil services with 
functions of individual workers defined within the team con- 
cept as an individual and as a member of a team. Many areas 
are now using regularly scheduled team conferences as a 
preventive measure. 

5. Increasing emphasis on the need for high levels of competency 
and skill on the part of all personnel. Local school systems 
are moving far beyond the minimum State certification re- 
quirements in their requirements for initial employment. In- 
service programs are being planned for personnel in terms of 
increasing professional competency. 

6. Widespread concern to improve the ratio of personnel pro- 
viding pupil services to the number of students for whom 
these workers are responsible. 

7. Increased use of community resources. School personnel are 
discovering more and more untapped resources in the local 
communities. 

8. Increasing work with parents. Workers in pupil services have 
found that direct contact with parents creates a better under- 
standing of the problem. 

One particular area of emphasis was the work with the 
Maryland Commission for Children and Youth; the State De- 
partment of Employment Security; and representatives of busi- 
ness, industry, and labor concerning young people who are 



58 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



dropping out of school before graduation. Efforts were made 
through continuing discussions to find ways in which the prob- 
lems of these young people may be met. These discussions 
pointed up the need for additional personnel in this Department 
to work particularly in this area. 

In 1961-62 the number of counselors increased from 472 to 
525. This figure is particularly significant in light of the popu- 
lation growth in the State from a secondary school enrollment 
of 249,101 in 1960-61 to a secondary school enrollment of 264,253 
in 1961-62. Even with this population growth, it has been 
possible to reduce the counselor-pupil ratio from 1 to 525 in 
1960-61 to 1 to 502 in 1961-62. 

Special Education 

Continued efforts have been directed toward the develop- 
ment of new services and the improvement of existing programs 
for exceptional children and youth in the State. All local school 
systems now provide special class services for the mentally 
retarded. Services were increased for children and youth with 
specific learning disabilities such as aphasia, strephosymbolia, 
and perceptual dysfunction. More than 12,000 children received 
itinerant services in speech, hearing, and vision. In-service 
workshops, conferences, summer workshops, special committees, 
annual meetings, and visits to special classes continued to pro- 
vide means by which programs were improved. 

The Supervisors of Special Education: 

1. Served on special committees with the Departments of Mental 
Hygiene and Health. 

2. Participated on the State Committee on Education Programs 
for the Emotionally Handicapped. A research project has 
been designed and will be submitted to Cooperative Research 
in December, 1962. This design is concerned with the identifi- 
cation of and programming for emotionally handicapped 
second graders. 

3. Planned a meeting for supervisors and administrators con- 
cerned with special education programs throughout the State. 
Representatives of Maryland School for the Deaf, Rosewood 
State Hospital, and Maryland School for the Blind discussed 
their educational programs and services. Pertinent problems 
related to special education were also discussed. 

4. Planned with the University of Maryland and the Southern 
Regional Education Board to further the scholarship program 
for teachers of the partially sighted and blind. Four Mary- 
land teachers received scholarships and attended George Pea- 
body College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee, during the 
summer of 1962. 

5. Worked with the steering committee for the development of 
curriculum guides for the mentally retarded. 

6. Planned and directed a three-weeks' workshop at the State 
Teachers College at Towson for teachers of the mentally 
retarded. More than 175 people participated in the workshop. 
There were 93 teachers, principals, and supervisors who re- 
ceived college credit. Three instructors provided theory and 
practical demonstrations for the participants. Outstanding 
specialists acted as lecturers and consultants to the workshop 
groups. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



Physical Fitness 

Concurrent with the establishment by President John F. 
Kennedy of the President's Council on Youth Fitness (which in 
1962 was changed to the President's Council on Physical Fitness) 
the Maryland State Legislature through a resolution established 
a Maryland Commission on Physical Fitness. The Commission 
was asked to make a report in January, 1962, on the physical 
fitness status of Maryland children of school age. The State De- 
partment of Education was requested by the Commission to 
submit a report on this subject as well as a report on the ways 
in which school physical education programs in particular and 
school programs in general would contribute to physical fitness 
needs of children and youth. 

A thirty-three-page report entitled "Physical Education 
Programs in Maryland Public Schools — A Report and Interpre- 
tation of Physical Education Programs in Maryland Public 
Schools with Specific Reference to Physical Fitness" was distrib- 
uted to the administrators and physical education teachers in the 
twenty-four Maryland local units. The most significant develop- 
ment that came out of the many negotiations for the development 
of the aforementioned report were eleven recommendations for 
improved school programs of physical fitness that were formu- 
lated and agreed upon by the Commission, the local superin- 
tendents of schools, and the Maryland State Department of 
Education. 

Several meetings of local supervisors responsible for physi- 
cal education programs were held during the school year. An 
important decision made by the group was that a physical fit- 
ness testing program should be administered to 5th, 8th, and 
11th grade pupils each year. The use of a score card from which 
important information can be obtained by electronic data proc- 
essing was adopted. 

The annual conference of the Maryland Association for 
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation was given over 
largely to physical fitness objectives for school physical educa- 
tion programs. 



INTERSCHOOL SPORTS PROGRAM 

Plans were laid by the superintendents of schools and the 
officers of the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Asso- 
ciation for the desegregation of the annual State Basketball 
Tournament in 1962. This would mean the full desegregation 
of all athletic projects held at the State level. The last step could 
be taken in light of the harmonious process in which the State 
Cross Country and Track and Field projects had been integrated 
in the prior three years. 



60 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Health Education 

Under the sponsorship of the Maryland State School Health 
Council, an advisory committee to the State Departments of 
Education and Health, the Maryland Conference on School 
Health Education was held in Annapolis on May 4-5, 1962. 
The conference was well attended by representatives from many 
disciplines in school systems. State and local health departments, 
institutions of higher learning, voluntary health agencies, and 
civic groups. Planning for the conference was done by a member 
of the planning committee to determine firsthand needs and 
questions to be incorporated in the program of the conference 
for possible solution. The proceedings of the conference will be 
printed. 

Outdoor Education 

Washington County schools embarked on an outdoor school 
program in which elementary school pupils are afforded an 
educational program while living in a camp situation for five 
school days. At least three other counties have continued some 
type of outdoor education. 

Adult Education 

During 1961-62, the adult education programs in Maryland 
varied from the very extensive offerings of the metropolitan 
areas to the modest offerings of the rural communities, but in 
each case there was a perceptibly greater interest being shown 
in adult education. 

Among the discernible trends are continued local determina- 
tion of the programs of the various school systems, consideration 
of community problems, consideration of the needs of groups of 
people, and coordination of adult education efforts within a 
community. 

Each local school system plans its adult education program 
in the light of the needs of its own communities. Maintenance 
of mountain crafts is central to one community ; understanding 
the new mathematics is important to another. Classes in busi- 
ness education comprise the total program in one community, 
offerings as varied as Americanization, Spanish, and ceramics 
constitute the program in another. This practice of local de- 
termination characterizes adult education to a far greater extent 
than any other phase of education because there are few se- 
quential requirements and no degrees. 

Adult education is becoming more conscious of its role in 
helping to solve community problems. Illustrations of this in 
Baltimore are the focal point discussions of urbanization and 
its attendant difficulties, the various groups considering unem- 
ployment, and an eighteen-hour workshop on dependency. Public 
adult education was involved in each of these in 1961-62. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



Another significant approach to adult education has been 
consideration of the needs of groups of people. Parents have 
continued to receive emphasis in a program designed for them, 
and two new groups have appeared — the school dropouts and 
the aging. In each of these areas, adult educators have partici- 
pated in conferences and plans involving educational programs. 

A trend inherent in those already mentioned is the increased 
cooperation among the many community agencies and organiza- 
tions responsible for the welfare of adults. This coordination 
of effort has served to make adult education more effective. 

New developments in program are the completion of a State 
Department of Education bulletin on public adult education, an 
increase in the number of liberal adult education seminars, and 
participation in the Federal program of civil defense adult 
education. The bulletin, when released, will give direction to the 
entire program of public adult education in the State. 

Civil Defense Adult Education Program 

On February 28, 1962, a contract was made between the 
Maryland State Board of Education and the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation for the purpose of developing a civil defense adult educa- 
tion program in Maryland. 

A State Coordinator of Civil Defense Adult Education was 
appointed effective March 1, 1962, and he attended the OCD 
Staff College Adult Education Seminar in Battle Creek, Michi- 
gan, from March 5-13, 1962. 

From late March until early May a group of 30 teachers 
received training from the coordinator to qualify to be CDAE 
teachers in the regular adult program. Subsequently, two classes 
of adults were enrolled and received from two of these teachers 
the twelve-hour course. 

The sum of $6,904 was spent between March 1, 1962, and 
June 30, 1962, for salaries (coordinator and secretary), travel, 
office operation, and local course reimbursement. 

The remainder of the fiscal year was used for the prepara- 
tion of instructional materials and for the arrangement with 
various local superintendents and their adult education supervi- 
sors for teacher training classes beginning in the fall of 1962. 



62 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The year 1961-62 records the continuing growth of libraries 
in the State. Public and school libraries are experiencing in- 
creasing demands for library materials from the general public, 
teachers, and other special users, and from the students them- 
selves. Planning for the most effective use of present staff and 
materials and for new and enlarged patterns of organization and 
service has characterized the activities of the Division of Library 
Extension and of local public and school library officials. 

The second year of the contract services between the Enoch 
Pratt Free Library and the State Department of Education 
showed substantial increases in use of the services with book 
circulation increasing 21 per cent and film services 5 per cent 
over the previous year. The growing awareness on the part of 
local library patrons and the satisfaction of librarians of the 
services available indicate an ever-increasing demand for more 
specialized materials. Minor changes in regulations and proce- 
dures and the availability of low-cost photocopying of materials 
have made for faster services and an increase in the materials 
available through the Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

Library service to the blind in Maryland is provided by 
contract with the Virginia Commission for the Visually Handi- 
capped. Through this service more than 750 readers in Mary- 
land borrowed approximately 20,000 recorded books and periodi- 
cals during the year. 

The division continued its sponsorship of the collection, 
"Books on Exhibit," by arranging the scheduling of this col- 
lection of approximately 800 new books to the local school sys- 
tems. This collection provides an opportunity for teachers, li- 
brarians, parents, students, and the general public to see and 
examine current materials as an aid to selection and purchase. 

Public Libraries 

In 1962 Maryland adopted a new formula for distribution 
of State-aid to local public libraries which sets a significant 
partnership pattern for State-local support of public library 
service. Passed by the 1962 State Legislature, and effective 
July 1, 1963, the amendment to the public library law provides 
that on a minimum $1.20 per capita expenditure for current 
operating costs, the State will contribute 30 per cent, the local 
units of government 70 per cent of the State-wide total. Per- 
centages are calculated by local unit according to the ratio of 
the local unit's assessment to the whole State's assessment. 

Another revision to the public library law, also enacted by 
the 1962 Legislature but effective July 1, 1962, provided an in- 
crease under the present distribution of State-aid formula from 
$0.10 per capita to $0.25, giving libraries from $0.27 to $0.33 
per capita for current operating expenses. The new legisla- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



tive measures, effective in 1963-64, will increase the amount of 
State aid to approximately $1,275,000, provided all library sys- 
tems qualify for the increased financing program. The old 
formula expires in 1966; until that time local units may receive 
State aid under either the old or new formula. 

Increased demand for library services is evident throughout 
the State. Use of libraries increased 16 per cent from 1960 to 
1962, with more than twelve million books and other materials 
being borrowed from the public libraries. 

County public libraries growth continues at a rate exceed- 
ing the estimated increase in population. There are more books 
available, more books borrowed, more borrowers using the 
libraries' materials and facilities than in any preceding year. 
From all indications this rate of growth will continue through 
the next five to ten years at a minimum. More qualified person- 
nel, more or larger buildings, and larger collections of materials 
will be needed to keep pace with the demand for service. 

The first major revision of the State plan for use of Federal 
Library Services Act funds was effective in 1961-62. With the 
establishment of the Frederick County Library on January 1, 
1962, only one Maryland county does not support a county public 
library. Since a basic objective of the Library Services Act plan, 
to establish county libraries, had been so nearly achieved, the plan 
was rewritten to emphasize the development of cooperative prac- 
tices between libraries. 

Applications for new projects approved in 1961-62 were 
varied and ambitious. The new projects were: 

1. Eastern Shore Library Processing Center 

The Wicomico County Library is the center of this project 
in which Kent, Queen Anne's, Caroline, Talbot, Dorchester, 
Wicomico, and Worcester county libraries are cooperating. The 
Processing Center, located in the basement of the State Teach- 
ers College at Salisbury, orders, catalogs, processes, and ships 
books for the seven member libraries. The Center began 
operations in January, 1962, with photoduplicating and 
printing equipment, and staffed with one professional librarian 
and two clerical workers. 

Member libraries pay seventy-five cents per volume 
processed and Library Services Act funds provide the diflfer- 
ence between this fee and actual cost of operation. 

2. Kent-Caroline Library Association 

With the establishment of the Kent and Caroline county 
libraries in the past year came the formation of the Kent- 
Caroline Library Association. One administrator serves the 
two counties. A committee of the two library boards governs 
the operation of the shared activities which include book 
selection, accounting and bookkeeping, clerical routines (e.g., 
overdue notices), and bookmobile service. The bookmobile, 
which is owned by the Association, was purchased with 
Library Services Act funds. 

In its first year the Association has adopted book selec- 
tion and personnel policies, and instituted service in both coun- 
ties. Association headquarters are in Ridgely. 



64 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



3. In-Service Training Project 

Baltimore, Carroll, Cecil, and Harford county libraries 
participated in a cooperative thirteen-week in-service training 
program. A course in general reference work for less than 
fully-qualified staff members for 13 full work days was con- 
ducted by the cooperating libraries in Bel Air. A qualified 
librarian taught each morning session (which included indi- 
vidual work on reference problems) and subject specialists 
reviewed the materials of a special area at each afternoon 
session. About 30 staff members were enrolled in the non- 
credit activity. 

4. Eastern Shore Adult Services Project 

The seven Eastern Shore county libraries applied for 
this activity which is administered by the Talbot County 
Library. Based on the desirability of having available a full- 
time adult services specialist on the Shore, the project aims 
are to provide guidance in book selection, development of 
collections, in-service training, and associated activities with 
adults to the sponsoring libraries. The adult services spe- 
cialist was employed as of February 1, 1962. In the succeed- 
ing months the major activity was establishing procedures for 
acquiring and evaluating current materials. Known as the 
Eastern Shore Book Selection Center, the office space is in the 
Talbot County courthouse. Meetings of the Shore librarians 
are held twice a month for review and selection of books and 
for programs on various aspects of library service. 

5. Talbot-Queen Anne's Bookmobile Project 

To make more adequate use of the Talbot County book- 
mobile, the Queen Anne's County Library contracted with the 
Talbot County Library for bookmobile service. The Talbot 
County schedule had provided for three days per week service 
to Talbot County patrons. Under the plan and contract, Tal- 
bot County now serves Queen Anne's County residents with 
community bookmobile service. The joint service, financed by 
local and Federal funds, started in January, 1962, and has 
been heavily used by patrons in both counties. 



SCHOOL LIBRARIES 

In 1961-62 for the first time expenditures for public school 
libraries from appropriated funds exceeded $1,000,000 and the 
expenditure per pupil belonging $2.00. This represents an in- 
crease of 415 per cent in total expenditures and a per pupil in- 
crease of 215 per cent for the ten-year period since 1951-52. 

There were 347 full-time librarians in Maryland public 
schools in October, 1961, 82 of these in elementary schools; and 
109 part-time librarians, about half of whom were assigned to 
elementary schools. In 1951-52 there were fewer than 200 librar- 
ians in all of the public schools and less than half a dozen of 
these were in the elementary schools. 

The two school library supervisors appointed late in the 
school year 1960-61 began work in August, 1961. There is now 
a total of seven systems with school library supervision. These 
seven systems enrolled more than 75 per cent of the pupils attend- 
ing Maryland public schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



Montgomery County became the first system in the State 
to accept the concept of the school library as an instructional 
materials center. In order to implement the concept, a Division 
of Instructional Materials was established which coordinated the 
selection, procurement, and processing of all instructional mate- 
rials used in the schools. In the first eleven months of its opera- 
tion the processing center processed and delivered to schools 
93,690 volumes. The county also held 48 instructional materials 
workshops to acquaint librarians and teachers with new mate- 
rials and services being provided. The extended hours program 
which kept libraries in selected schools open during evening 
hours and Saturday mornings was continued. 

At least six systems began or continued experiments in keep- 
ing selected school libraries open during summer vacation 
periods. 

Students in selected school libraries in Baltimore City and 
Anne Arundel and Baltimore counties participated in the phase 
of the Deiches Study of the Enoch Pratt Free Library which dealt 
with library materials for students. 

Shortage of personnel continued to be serious. School li- 
brarians are equally as scarce as teachers. Recruiting for top 
positions was extremely difficult; e.g., Baltimore County had to 
wait ten months to fill the supervisory vacancy created when one 
of its supervisors accepted a position with the American Library 
Association. 

The Division of Library Extension sponsored two regional 
meetings for school administrators and librarians : one for Mont- 
gomery and Prince George's counties and one for the Eastern 
Shore. The State Supervisor of School Libraries participated in 
meetings of all school library personnel in twelve of the local 
school systems. In addition work was done in twenty-one local 
systems with local administrators and librarians in planning and 
evaluating various phases of the library program. 

Related activities of the supervisor included continuing as 
editor of Maryland Libraries, participating in two national con- 
ferences on library education, serving as consultant to West 
Virginia and Virginia in their School Library Development Proj- 
ect, and the writing of a comprehensive article on trends in 
school library development for the periodical Library Trends. 



66 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Agriculture 

The past year has witnessed a continuation of trends which 
have a profound influence on agricultural education in this State. 
While the decrease in crop land has not been significant, there has 
been a decrease in the number of farms and, as a result, an in- 
crease in the size of farms that remain. Therefore, mechaniza- 
tion has reached a stage undreamed of ten years ago. The Voca- 
tional Agriculture program at all levels must continually adapt 
itself to greater demands in this field. Another significant de- 
velopment is the rapid increase in the number of part-time farm- 
ers. While the acreage is not large, the State program must serve 
these people with a different type of program. Ornamental horti- 
culture, which recently had its beginning in the suburban area, 
continues to grow at a steady pace. As teachers gain in knowl- 
edge in this field, this program could doubtless become extremely 
important in the next few years. 

Membership in the Future Farmers of America and the New 
Farmers of America is about 3,000. The goals and objectives of 
these organizations do much in developing needed qualities of 
citizenship and leadership, while at the same time encouraging 
boys to aim for superior accomplishment in agriculture. The 
systematic progressive advancement through degrees has proven 
its worth many times in an improvement, not only in the boys' 
farming program but likewise in the boys' personalities and 
characters. 

Educational Services to Industry 

Considerable interest was shown by representatives from 
education, economic development commissions, chambers of com- 
merce, and colleges who attended a ^'Conference on Small Busi- 
ness Management Courses," in making use locally of the program 
material made available by the Small Business Administration. 

More than 500 representatives of management and organized 
labor from Maryland and surrounding states attended the fourth 
Biennial Middle Atlantic States Apprenticeship and Training 
Conference held in Baltimore. Twenty-one separate trade group 
meetings and four general sessions were developed around the 
theme: ''Training for Growth" with specific emphasis on: (1) 
selection, testing, and interviewing of candidates; (2) training 
techniques used on the job and in the classroom; and (3) up- 
dating the current craft programs. 

Vocational educators from Pennsylvania, Virginia, West 
Virginia, and Maryland met at Hancock, Maryland, for a two- 
day meeting in November, 1961, to discuss "Improving Educa- 
tional Supervision." 

In cooperation with the Maryland Society of Training Direc- 
tors and McCoy College of The Johns Hopkins University, more 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



than 300 supervisors and management people participated in an 
all-day seminar on ''Improving Instruction and Human Relations 
On-the-Job," held on The Johns Hopkins University campus. 

More than 140 school business officials, supervisors, and head 
custodians from 19 local school systems and 11 colleges and State 
institutions attended a three-day Building Care and Operations 
Workshop held at the State Teachers College at Towson. The 
program was developed in cooperation with the School Business 
Officials of Maryland and the District of Columbia, the Baltimore 
County Schools, and the State Teachers College at Towson and 
was designed particularly to help the newly-appointed principal. 

Of considerable importance to vocational education and 
industry in Maryland was the passage by the Legislature of a bill 
creating the Maryland State Apprenticeship Council to be ad- 
ministratively supported by the State Department of Education, 
with the Director of the Vocational Division named as the 
Director of the Council. 

Assistance in designing an in-service training program was 
given to Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore City; Rosewood 
State Hospital, Baltimore County; and the Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital at Perry Point, Cecil County. 

Home Economics Education 

The areas of Interior Design, Home Furnishings, and 
Family Relationships were given special emphasis through State- 
level workshops. In-service programs on the local level were 
offered in these areas by teachers and supervisors who partici- 
pated in the State workshops. 

The major purposes of the in-service programs in each 
subject matter area were: to examine current trends and devel- 
opments, to review the basic underlying principles and their 
application, to consider appropriate instructional materials and 
methods of teaching. 

Twenty-one school systems offered programs in home eco- 
nomics for adults. A total of 336 classes with an enrollment of 
7,766 were held in 16 different phases of home economics. 

Local school systems continue their efforts to broaden their 
offerings in home economics, and there is a growing awareness of 
the need for programs adapted to groups such as residents in 
housing centers, senior citizens, young homemakers, and indi- 
viduals and families with low incomes. 

Reports show that women use skills learned in adult educa- 
tion classes to provide additional income for the family. Cater- 
ing, millinery, clothing alteration, preparation of special food 
products, and construction of clothing are among the services 
which women provide in the community. 

Fifteen teachers and 392 students participated in the Sum- 
mer Home Visitation Program. Teachers consider the experience 
of home visitation as one of the most valuable in-service educa- 



68 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



tion programs available to them. With the increasing complexity 
of urban living, teachers find the contact v^ith homes becomes 
more important each year for the over-all development of the 
home economics curriculum. A few of the values of the extended 
school program reported by teachers are: understanding of 
common goals held by teachers and parents for the individual 
student, providing an opportunity for teachers to observe hov^ 
classroom learnings are being applied in a home situation, plan- 
ning school programs to meet student needs in relation to the 
family situation, helping other family members v^ith problems 
brought to the teacher's attention during the home visit. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Enrollment increases during the past year have reflected 
a continuing interest in the development of additional programs 
in trade preparatory courses. Use of advisory committees and 
close cooperation with the Maryland State Employment Serv- 
ice have materially improved course content and trade practices 
and have also resulted in the dropping of some courses and the 
addition of others as the schools have attempted to keep abreast 
of the changing needs of employers. 

Pilot programs in part-time work experience, short-term 
preemployment classes for out-of-school youth and adults, train- 
ing and retraining of the unemployed, and area vocational schools 
give evidence of the great need in providing further opportunities 
in these fields. 

Six of the counties are including facilities for new or ex- 
panded vocational offerings in their planning of future compre- 
hensive high schools to serve better the vocational needs of 
in-school and out-of-school youth. 

Technical Education 

The extremely rapid technological changes in the State are 
presenting new challenges to vocational education. Title III of 
the George Barden Act, as amended by Title VIII of the Na- 
tional Defense Education Act, has encouraged a re-evaluation 
of the program of vocational education and has provided an 
opportunity for the development of area programs in technical 
education on both the secondary and post secondary levels. 

Washington and Montgomery counties and Baltimore City 
have taken the initiative in developing outstanding programs in 
the various technologies through use of Federal funds for equip- 
ment and salaries of instructors. A workshop was conducted in 
Montgomery County to develop curriculum guides and resource 
material in five of these areas. 

Two-year terminal technical programs have been established 
in the community colleges in Baltimore City and Allegany, Bal- 
timore, Harford, and Montgomery counties, and plans are being 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



developed to expand the offerings to include extension courses 
for upgrading employees in the technical occupations. 

Fire Service Extension 

During the past year all of the twenty-three counties held 
one or more fireman training classes with a total State enrollment 
of more than 2,000. 

Tax Assessors Program 

This program has contributed much to the professionaliza- 
tion of assessment practices and in bringing Maryland to the 
top level of performance in this field. Courses in Basic Laws of 
Assessment, Better Public Relations, and Equalization of Real 
Estate Tax Distribution were conducted at the University of 
Maryland with an enrollment of 42. 

Practical Nurse Education 

Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School in Balti- 
more City conducted two Practical Nurse programs during the 
past year. The adult program was conducted in and for Sinai 
Hospital, with all the preclinical teaching being done in the 
hospital by public school instructors. The clinical classroom and 
on-the-job instruction was given by hospital staff instructors, 
coordinated by the public schools. There were 27 adults in this 
program. 

The high school program, as approved by the State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses and the State Department of Education, 
provides for both theory and training in the preclinical subjects 
in the school during the tenth and eleventh grades and the theory 
and practice in the clinical subjects in the hospital during the 
twelfth grade. In addition to the practical nursing subjects, the 
student meets all requirements in the academic subjects for high 
school graduation. To make it possible for the student to spend 
full time in the hospital during the twelfth year, all academic 
subjects are scheduled in the tenth and eleventh years. 



70 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

The services of the Division of Certification and Accredita- 
tion for the year 1961-62 may be reported generally under four 
broad headings: 

1. Certification of teachers 

2. Accreditation of educational programs 

3. High school equivalence certificates 

4. Teacher recruitment-scholarships 

Certification 

As may be seen from TABLE 58, page 155, the number of 
certificates issued to teachers, supervisors, and administrators 
during the academic year 1961-62 has continued to increase. In 
1959-60 there were 4,407 certificates of all types issued. In the 
academic year 1960-61 there v^ere 5,124 certificates issued, while 
in 1961-62 5,735 certificates were issued in the over-all certifica- 
tion of teachers for the Sate. The local school systems of the 
State during the year 1961-62 employed 1,302 more teachers 
than in the previous year. However, only 611 additional cer- 
tificates were issued. This indicates that the percentage of teacher 
turnover continues to show a slow but positive decrease for the 
State as a whole. Of the total number of certificates issued 2,557 
were emergency, provisional, or other substandard certificates, 
while 3,178 certificates were issued to teachers who had met full 
qualifications for regular certification. 

For the school year 1960-61 it was reported that 45.5 per 
cent of new certificates issued were based upon qualifications 
which failed to meet the full requirements for regular certifica- 
tion. Applying the figures for the 1961-62 school year this figure 
had decreased to 44.6 per cent. Of the 2,557 staff members who 
were issued emergency, provisional, or other substandard cer- 
tificates, 1,950 had met the requirements for the baccalaureate 
degree. Over the past several years the percentage of teachers 
who were issued emergency or other substandard certificates but 
who held college degrees has ranged from 60 per cent to 71.2 
per cent. For the year 1961-62, however, this percentage in- 
creased to 76.3 per cent. Any holder of the emergency or pro- 
visional degree certificate can usually, with relatively little effort, 
qualify for regular certification in one of the various teaching 
fields. In many cases the holders of these so-called substandard 
certificates have at one time held a regular certificate but have 
allowed the certificate to lapse due to not having engaged in 
recent formal study. Others have good subject matter prepara- 
tion but lack some of the necessary professional preparation 
required for full certification. 

From a study of TABLE 58 referred to herein and from the 
figures presented in this brief summary it may be stated that the 
over-all preparation of teachers serving in the public schools 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



of the State continues to show improvement. This marks the 
third successive year in which this trend can be determined. 
While the improvement is not so marked as might be desired, 
the trend at least offers encouragement for the future. 

Accreditation 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

For the first time in several years no new community college 
programs were given official approval to operate in the State 
during the past academic year. However, all eleven of the pre- 
viously-approved public community colleges continued to show 
increases in enrollment and other indications of developing 
strength as colleges of the State. Members of the Department 
served on various committees of the Middle States Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools and assisted in the evaluation 
of college level programs. 

During the year three institutions were given initial accredit- 
ation by the Middle States Association, two at the community 
college level. An additional college was re-evaluated and its 
accreditation reaffirmed. 

Work with the Fulbright scholarship program continues 
to be a function of the Division and a member of the staff worked 
with the Maryland State Committee on Fulbright Scholarships 
which met in November of 1961 and nominated a panel of candi- 
dates for these awards. 

The assistant director of the division served as secretary 
to the Commission for the Expansion of Public Higher Educa- 
tion in Maryland under the chairmanship of Mr. John N. Curlett. 
This commission completed its study and presented its report to 
the Governor as of June 25, 1962. It is anticipated that legisla- 
tion concerning public higher education in Maryland will result 
from the work of this commission. 

Approval of college level programs for the training of war 
veterans and orphans continues to be a very active function of the 
division. During the year approvals were granted to 15 hospitals 
and nursing schools and 44 colleges and universities. The form 
of the Department's publication. State- Approved Maryland Col- 
leges and Universities, was revised during the year, and the an- 
nual publication was issued as in the past but in an expanded 
form, providing additional information to the interested public. 
This listing included 16 two-year colleges, 48 four-year colleges 
and universities, 20 schools of nursing, 21 institutions approved 
for teacher education, and 10 professional schools. 

Nonpublic Academic Schools Below College Level 

The number and kind of academic schools below college level 



72 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



which were operating in the State in 1961-62 and which had been 
approved by the Department were as follows: 



Type of School Number 

Secondary 53 

Tutoring 8 

Nursery School (only) (1)* 30 

Kindergarten (only) (23)* 41 

Nursery School and Kindergarten 19 

Preschool through Elementary 20 

Elementary (only) 7 

Elementary through Secondary 8 

Preschool through Secondary 2 

Special (2)* ^ 

Total 209 



* Shows number operating two daily sessions. Ten of these schools 
have different teachers for each session. 

Nonpublic Secondary Schools 

On the approved list of nonpublic academic secondary 
schools there are 63 regular secondary schools and eight tutoring 
schools. Of these 71 schools, 47 were church-operated and 24 
were privately-operated. As may be expected, whenever there 
has been a growth in the number of young people of secondary 
school age, there has been increased interest in the establishment 
of nonpublic secondary schools. The inquiries for information 
concerning the procedure in establishing such schools have come 
from both church-sponsored groups and organizations and pri- 
vate individuals or groups of such individuals. In some cases the 
initial inquiry was followed through and an application for 
formal approval submitted and eventually an approved school 
resulted. In other cases the cost of establishing a program worthy 
of approval or the difficulty of obtaining suitable quarters served 
as a deterrent and the schools initially visualized failed to de- 
velop. The net result is an over-all increase of one nonpublic 
secondary school operating within the State. 

Nonpublic Nursery Schools, Kindergartens, Elementary Schools, and 

Special Schools 

These schools are operating in the following ways : 



Cooperatives with parents participating 37 

Cooperatives administered by parents who do not 

participate daily 10 

Smaller centers (proprietary — 3 groups or less) . . .36 
Larger centers (proprietary — 4 groups or more) . . .11 

Schools governed by board of directors 31 

Church-sponsored centers 8 

Others (sponsored by housing projects, civic 

groups, colleges, etc.) .15 

Total 148 

Unlike the secondary schools a number of the academic 



schools below the secondary school level discontinue operation 
each year. As has been the case for the secondary schools, how- 
ever, considerable interest has been shown in the opening of new 



ll 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



schools. While ten such programs discontinued operation, four- 
teen new programs were approved. 

There were during the 1961-62 school year 21 centers which 
offered day nursery or extended day care programs as part of the 
entire offering. In 13 of these centers the present program was 
originally approved when the Maryland nonpublic school law, 
Section 25 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland 
(1957 edition), became effective in 1948. There are still 13 of 
these programs for which approval of the entire operations is con- 
tinued. Of the remaining eight, one center, once fully approved, 
now has approval of only kindergarten and elementary programs 
and two centers agreed to return certificates in June, 1962, and 
will operate as day care centers only. There are five schools, 
kindergarten and/or elementary programs approved, which have 
never requested approval of the nursery program. Enrollment 
figures indicate that there are 482 children enrolled for the full 
day at centers which provide day nursery or extended day care 
programs. There are also 389 children attending half-day ses- 
sions at these centers. Eight centers have not included in their 
enrollment figures the number of children in a day care program 
which is not approved. 

Enrollment in the nonpublic elementary and preschool 
centers during the two years 1960-61 and 1961-62, including new 
schools approved during each of these years w^ere as follows : 



Enrollment* 

Type of School 1960-61 1961-62 

Nursery schools 1,888 1,781 

Kindergartens 2,345 2,538 

Elementary schools 3,122 13,642 

Special schools 839 855 

Total 8,194 8,816 

* Figures are those for all schools listed as operating during the year, 
including new schools and those removed from list during 1961-62 year or 
closed at end of school year. 

t In the five schools tei-minating at eighth grade there were 303 
children enrolled. Figure is included in elementary enrollment total. 



Nonpublic Specialized Schools 

In this classification ten schools applied for approval and 
received certificates and 23 schools received tentative approval. 
Ten schools closed in the period July 1, 1961, to June 30, 1962. 
During the period of this report consultants were engaged in 
the following fields to assist with the evaluation of course mate- 
rials and requests for approval : dental technology, motel manage- 
ment, air conditioning and refrigeration, electronics, automotive 
mechanics. During the year one or more staff members have 
participated in seminars for cosmetology teachers conducted 
under the auspices of the State Board of Cosmetology, served in 
a consultative capacity at the meeting of the National Association 



74 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



of Cosmetology Schools, in Chicago, and represented Maryland 
at the annual meeting of the National Association of State Ap- 
proval Agencies, held in St. Louis, Missouri. 

During the winter and spring of 1962 rather extensive work 
was done in assembling information for the purpose of develop- 
ing standards for reasonable refund policies and reasonable con- 
tracts for the specialized nonpublic schools. The problem of en- 
forcing standards in reference to contracts and refund policies 
which are fair to the operating schools and also provide guaran- 
tees against financial loss to the public continues to be a difficult 
one. However, as more states enact legislation requiring approval 
and a measure of control over educational programs, as well as 
solicitors who attempt to enroll students for out-of-State schools, 
there is continuing hope for improvement in providing protec- 
tion to the public and the schools which are interested in offering 
sound instructional opportunities. During this report period in 
Maryland there were approximately 30,000 students enrolled in 
the nonpublic specialized schools in the State and more than 900 
teachers were employed for instructional purposes within these 
schools. 



High School Equivalence 

Following the nationwide trend, the largest number of Mary- 
land residents applied for the high school equivalence examina- 
tion during the year 1961-62 of any year in the history of the pro- 
gram. A total of 2,327 individuals applied for and completed the 
examination leading to the issuance of this certificate. Of this 
number 1,617 were for the first time taking the examination, 
and 710 had previously submitted to the examination but had not 
achieved scores high enough to warrant the issuance of the certifi- 
cate. Successful candidates numbered 1,181. In addition, certifi- 
cates were awarded to 719 applicants who had completed the test 
while in service to the United States Armed Forces Institute. 
The community college movement has spurred interest in the 
equivalence examination and about 40 per cent of the applicants 
wish to qualify for college entrance. Another 40 per cent of those 
applying need the certificate to secure initial employment or to 
assist in promotion in organizations in which current employ- 
ment is held. The remainder of those applying wish merely to 
satisfy a personal ambition. The examination is administered 
each month at the regular testing centers throughout the State 
and at least once annually at the five penal institutions. In addi- 
tion, during the past year the test was given in the Department 
offices to 86 individuals who, for justifiable reasons, could not 
submit to the examination on the scheduled Saturdays at the local 
testing centers. Special arrangements also were made to ad- 
minister the examination to three patients at Montebello Hospital 
and to one severely handicapped person confined to his home. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



Teacher Recruitment — Scholarship Program 

During the period of this report the work involved in the 
administration of the teacher education scholarship program 
increased tremendously due to the full complement resulting from 
a fourth year of operation in this field. Also, various ramifica- 
tions and problems developed as a result of the multiple State 
scholarship examination being employed to serve the need for 
three programs : the State Senatorial Scholarship Program, the 
State Teacher Education Scholarship Program, and the General 
State Scholarship Program. The Teacher Education Scholarship 
Program had by 1961-62 attained its fully planned capacity of 
608 scholarship holders in attendance at Maryland colleges. 
Under these conditions the work involved in the proper operation 
of this program rapidly expanded until it required a great por- 
tion of the time of one staff member working in this field. Early 
in October the State Superintendent of Schools was approached 
by the chairman of the newly-created State Scholarship Board 
for assistance in setting up a State agency to administer the new^ 
program of general State scholarships. This request was met 
through the assignment of the Supervisor of Teacher Recruit- 
ment to make himself available to the State Scholarship Board 
and to devote as much time as possible to cooperating with the 
chairman of the Board to inaugurate and supervise the organiza- 
tion and operation of that agency. Since it was imperative that 
some type of official functioning agency be established as soon 
as possible in order that the scholarships placed under its juris- 
diction might be properly awarded, immediate attention was 
devoted to the establishment of a State scholarship authority. 
The staff member of the State Department of Education who 
had worked with scholarships in the past and who had more ex- 
perience in this activity than any other individual available was 
selected by the State Scholarship Board to become executive 
director of the new agency and at the close of the academic year 
1961-62 transferred to this new position. 

The actual function of administering the State Teacher 
Education Scholarship Program transferred with the Depart- 
ment member to the new agency, although a measure of nominal 
supervision has been retained by the Department of Education. 



76 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE 

Effective January 1, 1962, as a result of reorganization in the 
Department, the following functions, which were formerly car- 
ried out under the Division of Certification and Accreditation, 
were transferred to the Division of Administration and Finance : 
Driver Education, School Plant Planning, School Lunch and 
Special Milk Program, and Direct Distribution of Commodities. 

Driver Education 

Approximately 69 per cent of the schools in Maryland, which 
enroll children of driving age, made available some type of driver 
education program. Of the total number of eligible students 
reaching the age of 16, approximately 27 per cent participated in 
these programs. 

Public School Transportation 

During the school year more than a quarter million children 
were transported daily to the public schools in Maryland. In 
order to carry out this mass movement of school children, more 
than twenty-eight hundred vehicles were used. This equipment 
traveled about a hundred and fifty-four thousand miles of Mary- 
land roads each school day and approximately twenty-seven and 
a half million miles during the school year. 

All the local units now have an individual designated to 
supervise pupil transportation. This is a full-time responsibility 
for one or more persons in all but three counties. 

Three one-day conferences were held to assist supervisors in 
current practices and procedures in pupil transportation. Com- 
mittees were established to study and report on the following : 

1. State formula for reimbursement in minimum program of 
transportation 

2. Guide for selection and training of school bus drivers 

3. Bylaw 12 — Standard Rules and Regulations Governing Public 
School Transportation for the State of Maryland 

4. School bus contracts 

5. Inspection team and procedures 

6. Duties and responsibilities of local supervisors of transporta- 
tion 

7. School bus insurance 

There have been oral or w^ritten reports on these from all of 
the committees. 

It was found that all supervisory personnel could probably 
profit by a program of instruction sponsored by a college or uni- 
versity. Accordingly, arrangements were made with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland to establish a course on transportation to 
meet the needs of the supervisors. The course constituted a 
thorough survey of the most modern methods and facilities cur- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



rently employed in mass transportation of public school pupils. 
It emphasized the administrative and organization techniques 
which should be employed to insure the maximum possible safety, 
economy, efficiency, and adequacy in public school transportation. 

During the initial three weeks of the sequence the course 
was attended by twenty-one individuals representing twenty 
local school systems, all of whom were responsible for some pupil 
transportation operation in the State of Maryland. 

School Lunch and Direct Distribution of Commodities 

Program 

School Lunch and Special Milk Program 

To insure the lowest possible distributor cost to the schools 
participating in the School Lunch and Special Milk programs, 
reimbursement rates during the 1961-62 school year were again 
paid on the applicable fractional cent. This seemed to produce 
desired results in that distributor cost of milk continued to re- 
main stable in most instances. 

State-wide there was a 13.0 per cent increase in participation 
in the Special Milk Program in 1961-62 over 1960-61. Only three 
counties had decreases; the other local units shared in this 
increase. 

In the School Lunch Program there was an 8.4 per cent in- 
crease in participation in 1961-62 over 1960-61. With the excep- 
tion of four countries, all countries and Baltimore City shared in 
this increase. 

The rate of reimbursement was reduced from $.04 to $.02 
effective April 1, 1962. This was necessary because the number 
of lunches served was exceeding the available Federal funds for 
reimbursement of the lunches. 

In-service training programs were held throughout the school 
year in 10 of the counties and in Baltimore City. 

Direct Distribution of Commodities Program 

During the school year 1961-62, 870 schools participated 
in the program of distribution of U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture donated commodities. 

The administration and supervision of the program were 
conducted through the local boards of education and through 
direct contact with the nonpublic schools. 

Agreements covering the distribution of donated com- 
modities were either renewed or executed for the period Novem- 
ber 1, 1961, to November 1, 1962. 

Several nonpublic schools entered the program during the 
school year St. Peter Claver School (Baltimore, Maryland), St. 
Louis School, Archbishop Curley High School, and Calvert Hall 
College High School. 

A number of new public schools were added as part of the 
agreement with the local boards of education. 



78 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Eeport 



Those schools not participating in the National School Lunch 
Program, and therefore not certified as eligible for all available 
commodities, were required to submit an application for partici- 
pation in the Direct Distribution of Commodities Program. 

Total puchases of commodities by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture for Direct Distribution to schools in the State of 
Maryland amounted to approximately $2,450,000. 

Administration of distribution of the donated commodities 
entailed the locating and arrangement of the unloading of car- 
loads of food. This required the placement of 274 delivery orders 
with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the establishment 
of 298 case files to maintain the records covering the operation. 

School Plant Planning 

The public school laws of Maryland require that all purchases 
or sale of school sites, all plans and specifications for school build- 
ings, and all contracts and change orders on school construction 
be approved by the State Superintendent of Schools. During the 
past year, the staff members examined and recommended for 
approval the following: 

Deeds, 

Preliminary Final Rights-of- Change 

Sites Plans Plans Contracts way, etc. Orders 

26 106 101 93 105 307 

Proposed sites for new schools are visited by the Supervisor 
of School Plant Planning, and the locations are cooordinated with 
the State Roads Commission to avoid conflict with long-range 
planning for highway development. 

The Department continued to offer consultant service in 
planning building programs and cooperated with the Montgomery 
County Board of Education, the University of Maryland, the 
American Institute of Architects, and the School Facilities Coun- 
cil in a two-day conference on School Building Design. 

The Department cooperated with the U.S. Office of Educa- 
tion and the Federal Civil Defense Agency in collecting data for 
the National School Plant Facilities Survey. The data collected 
will be made available to the local school systems. 

A staflf member continued to work with the presidents of the 
State teachers colleges and with other State agencies in the de- 
velopment of long-range plans for capital improvements at the 
colleges. Fifty-two contracts and forty-six change orders were 
recommended for approval by the State Board of Education dur- 
ing the past year. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



division of research and development 

Organization and Purpose 

The Division of Research and Development was organized 
as a result of the action of the State Board of Education on No- 
vember 29, 1961. The organization of the new Division grew out 
of the need for a coordinated approach to research and statistics 
beginning with the use of good data-gathering instruments, the 
efficient processing of data particularly with electronic equip- 
ment, an organized approach to curriculum and administrative 
research in sufficient depth to be meaningful, and the publication 
of information in such form that it would be understandable and 
useable by groups concerned with improving the quality of educa- 
tion. The specific responsibilities of the division are as follows : 

1. Collecting, processing, analyzing, and reporting data for the 
statistical reports published by the Maryland State Depart- 
ment of Education. 

2. Preparing the Annual Report of the State Department of 
Education with the cooperation of all of the Divisions of the 
Department and evaluating the effectiveness of this report 
and such other reports and other media that will communicate 
most effectively the conditions and needs of the public schools 
in the State. 

3. Deriving relationships, trends, and implications through the 
use of statistical and research techniques applied to the 
kinds of data now gathered. 

4. Working with other staff members in determining the kinds 
of data to be gathered in such areas as staff utilization, 
administrative organization, teacher qualifications, and in- 
structional materials and processes. 

5. Cooperating with the research personnel in the local school 
systems and other appropriate agencies in developing special 
studies and research projects for the improvement of educa- 
tion in the State and for the evaluation of existing practices. 

6. Working with other state departments of education, regional 
groups such as the North Eastern States Council on Educa- 
tional Research and Statistics, and with other governmental 
agencies at local, state, and national levels in obtaining data 
and reporting them in as standardized form as possible so 
that data from various sources may be comparable. 

7. Developing codes, report forms, and procedures for auto- 
matic data-processing operations designed to relieve the staff 
of needless clerical work and improve the statistical services 
of the State Department of Education. 

8. Disseminating research findings, results of special studies, 
and statistical information through publications prepared in 
terms of the needs of the consumer both at the highly tech- 
nical level and at a level understandable by lay persons. 

During 1961-62 the division prepared a research design for 
the ''Identification of and Educational Programming for Emo- 
tionally Handicapped Children." This design was discussed with 
the U.S. Office of Education for possible financial assistance from 
the Federal Government. The Office of Education is interested in 



80 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



having research done in this area. Additional work remains to 
be done in reviewing what has already been completed and in re- 
fining the design in terms of known research. 

An example of the refining of procedures designed to reduce 
the amount of clerical work required and at the same time pro- 
vide additional information was the numerical coding of second- 
ary school subjects and the use of Social Security numbers for 
teacher identification purposes on all related reports. The use of 
these codes has made it possible to prepare information on second- 
ary school offerings not only in terms of subject areas but in terms 
of specific subject courses. It has also made possible the com- 
parison of teacher certification and preparation with actual as- 
signments, a job which had become too large to handle by the 
manual procedures previously employed. 

The statistical portions of the Annual Report of the State 
Board of education were analyzed and refinements made in pre- 
senting data; for instance, per pupil costs are now given both 
with and without transportation. The whole system of data pres- 
entation has been reviewed with a view to creating a data bank 
and disseminating information to interested persons as soon as 
information becomes available. 

Much of the work done to improve State statistical services 
has been carried out in cooperation with the U.S. Office of Educa- 
tion under the provisions of Title X of the National Defense 
Education Act. There has been a considerable exchange of in- 
formation between Maryland and other states on the use of re- 
porting forms and the dissemination of statistical information. 
During this fiscal year, Maryland received $10,970 from the 
Federal Government under the provisions of Title X of the 
National Defense Education Act. 

Meetings have been held throughout the year with staff mem- 
bers of the Department and with representatives from local 
school systems to exchange information on practices and pro- 
cedures used throughout the State in obtaining and using infor- 
mation in such areas as professional personnel and accredita- 
tion, pupil enrollment and attendance, finance, special services, 
and higher education. The research directors in the local school 
systems have met with representatives from the State Depart- 
ment of Education to exchange information about research being 
conducted in the local school systems and to discuss the possibility 
of expanding local research projects into a cooperative State- 
wide undertaking. 

During this year, through the use of automatic processing 
equipment it was possible for the first time to analyze informa- 
tion received from each elementary school in the State in detail 
not heretofore possible. Through the use of Marked-Sense cards, 
37 tables were prepared covering staff assignments of principals, 
regular classroom teachers, special instructional personnel, and 
administrative and clerical personnel in all the elementary schools 
of the State. This study also provided important information 



Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



about class size by grade level in the elementary schools. The 
large amount of useable data obtained from a relatively simple 
punched card is the result of the cooperative planning between 
members of the instructional staff of the elementary schools 
representatives of the local school systems, and the Division of Re- 
search and Development. 

Educational Television in Maryland 

The State Department of Education and the local school sys- 
tems worked together during the year on ways of expanding edu- 
cational television. Dr. William Brish, Superintendent of the 
Washington County schools, served as chairman of the many 
meetings that were held with school personnel and with rep- 
resentatives of the Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Com- 
pany. The Telephone Company developed several plans with esti- 
mated cost of implementation for distribution of closed-circuit 
educational television based on material submitted by the local 
school systems. Meetings were also held with representatives of 
the National Educational Television and Radio Center and with 
interested citizen groups. As a result of these meetings informa- 
tion was gathered concerning : 

1. The coordination of educational television in Maryland 

2. The construction of a network of open-circuit educational 
television stations 

3. The transmission of educational programs by means of closed- 
circuit television within and between local school systems 

4. The multiple use of open- and closed-circuit educational 
television 

Status of Educational Television in Maryland 

During the year television continued to be used as a means 
of direct teaching, as a means of enriching classroom activities, 
and as a means of informing the public. In Washington County 
six closed-circuit television channels were used to transmit 67 
hours per week of individual programs, including 115 live tele- 
casts and 11 films, to approximately 19,500 pupils, in addition 
to serving miscellaneous adult groups that came to the schools 
for special programs. Closed-circuit television was also used 
at the University of Maryland where three channels provided 
programs to approximately 12,000 students in 70 different class- 
rooms on the College Park campus. On the Eastern Shore the 
commercial station WBOC provided 9i hours per week of in- 
school programs to approximately 19,000 pupils in the Caroline, 
Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester county schools. 
In the Baltimore metropolitan area three commercial stations, 
WBAL, WJZ, and WMAR, provided some time for in-school pro- 
grams and for reports to the public as a public service in coopera- 
tion with the schools and institutions of the State. In the Wash- 



82 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



ington, D.C., metropolitan area the educational television station 
WETA provided nine hours per week of in-school programs plus 
15 hours of evening programs in addition to special programs. 

Plans for Further Development 

The Superintendents' Committee considered the need for 
expending both open-circuit and closed-circuit television so that 
schools might be able to receive by closed-ciruit television several 
programs simultaneously to meet the various curricular demands, 
and the public might be able to receive by open-circuit television 
on sets in their own homes programs of a broad educational and 
cultural nature. 

At the May 31, 1962, meeting of the State Board of Educa- 
tion a report was presented outlining the ways in which television 
could be used in the schools and an estimate of the costs for pro- 
viding a system of distributing closed-circuit television from each 
of the 24 local school systems to approximately 21,725 classrooms 
in approximately 1,035 buildings in the State. This report also 
contained an analysis of the cost of acquisition and operation of 
a UHF educational station and an estimate of costs of acquiring 
and operating additional stations on an interconnected basis for 
State-wide coverage. 

For the past ten years there have been groups of lay citizens 
interested in developing one or more educational television sta- 
tions in Maryland. This interest became more active during 1962 
when Federal legislation was introduced to provide financial as- 
sistance for the acquisition and construction of educational tele- 
vision facilities. On May 1, 1962, Public Law 87-447, known as 
the Educational Television Facilities Act, became law. This 
legislation authorized $32,000,000 for the acquisition and con- 
struction of educational television facilities with each state being 
eligible to receive a maximum of $1,000,000 on a matching basis. 

Just about this time the Child Study Association of Balti- 
more had been contacting persons throughout the State to ascer- 
tain their interest in forming a citizens' committee on educational 
television. The first meeting called by this group was on May 2 
at the Maryland State Department of Education at which time 
the Maryland Committee on Educational Television was formed. 
The committee went on record as to its interest in the coordinated 
development of educational television within the State and ap- 
pointed several of its members to meet with the Governor to urge 
that some action be taken so that Maryland might participate in 
the grants which were to become available through Federal legis- 
lation. The lay committee also recommended that the Governor 
designate the State Board of Education to serve as the Maryland 
State Educational Television Agency and appoint a representa- 
tive group of citizens to serve as the Maryland State Advisory 
Committee on Educational Television. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



83 



The State Superintendent of Schools wrote to Governor 
Tawes, expressing the interest of the State Department of Educa- 
tion in the coordination of expansion of educational television 
facilities in Maryland. The Governor assured the Committee and 
the State Superintendent of Schools that every consideration 
would be given to the proposals being made for the expansion 
of educational television facilities in Maryland. 



84 



Ninety- Sixth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

Fiscal year 1962 witnessed significant growth in vocational 
rehabilitation in Maryland. All-time highs were achieved in total 
case load (10,353), in number of cases served (6,361), and in 
number of rehabilitation closures (1,691). 

Total cost of the program in 1962 was $1,202,378, of which 
$685,858 came from Federal funds and $516,520 from State. To 
maintain the 1,691 rehabilitants on welfare would have required 
$1,367,880 for the year, a figure greater than that which was 
spent on serving 6,361 disabled persons ; while on the other hand, 
the 1,691 rehabilitants earned at the rate of $3,915,340, or three 
times as much as the total cost of the Maryland program in 1962. 

Throughout the State the division continued to expand and 
improve its services in various areas. The creation of three new 
counseling positions made possible the establishment of a full- 
time, two-man office in Anne Arundel County as well as the aug- 
mentation of services in the Metropolitan Baltimore District. In 
this district, the normal annual increase in the number of refer- 
rals of disabled persons has been greatly enlarged by the referral 
procedure instituted under the reorganization of the Workmen's 
Compensation Commission. If the present rate of increase in 
referrals continues, it will necessitate the assignment of several 
more counselors. 

The growing concern with the problems of the mentally 
retarded which is evident among all who are involved in health, 
welfare, and educational programs has been reflected in increas- 
ing demands upon the division for services to this group. In all 
parts of the State, workshops and training centers are being 
established by private groups which look to the staff for guidance 
and assistance. A counselor has worked with the Training Center 
in Easton in developing its program and has sponsored a number 
of clients in this facility. Likewise, members of the Southern 
Maryland staff have cooperated in the establishment of work- 
shops and training centers in Anne Arundel and Prince George's 
counties. In Western Maryland, four such facilities have been 
established, two of which, those in Allegany and Washington 
counties, are providing excellent though limited services. Those 
in Carroll and Frederick counties have only started. The coopera- 
tion of the division has been solicited by all of these groups, and 
the counseling staff is making every effort to assist in the develop- 
ment of effective programs. During the year, the Metropolitan 
Baltimore District and the Sheltered Workshop of the (Greater 
Baltimore Chapter of the Maryland Society for Mentally Re- 
tarded Children completed a revision of the working agreement 
between the two agencies. This facility has for several years 
been providing valuable evaluation and training services for 
clients of the division, and it is expected that the revised pro- 
cedures, together with the proposed expansion of the workshop. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



85 



will make available to the clients an even higher quality of 
service. 

Recent changes in the division's procedures for serving 
clients from the State mental hospitals have resulted in a greater 
scope and higher quality of services. Particular emphasis has 
been placed during the past year on improving services at 
Crownsville, Eastern Shore, and Springfield State hospitals. 

The Southern Maryland staff has been in active cooperation 
with the Montgomery County Board of Education in initiating a 
five-year demonstration project designed to give to handicapped 
pupils better and more adequate vocational preparation while 
they are still in school. It is felt that through a combination of 
classrooms and on-the-job training, it will be possible to decrease 
the number of school dropouts among the disabled children in the 
county. The division has also continued to participate in the Oc- 
cupational Therapy Aide training program which is a function of 
the Montgomery County Health Department. 

On the Eastern Shore, Division staff members have co- 
operated with the Maryland Heart Association in conducting two 
training programs. On the Lower Shore, a nurses' seminar on 
cardiovascular disease was held. On the Upper Shore, the divi- 
sion counselor and the Heart Association organized, at Washing- 
ton College, a ''Week-end with Medicine," during which an out- 
standing student from each of the high schools in the six counties 
participated in a program of information under the direction of 
qualified practitioners in medicine, nursing, and related fields 
with the object of encouraging greater numbers of capable young 
people to enter the various fields of health service. 

The Disability Determinations' Unit of the division concen- 
trated during 1962 on reducing the time required to process cases. 
Considerable progress resulted, but continued effort is being made 
in this direction as the best means to cope with the constantly 
increasing referral load. 

In the area of services to the blind, counselors were able to 
obtain sheltered workshop employment for an unusually large 
number of persons, chiefly as a result of accelerated activity in 
the Sub-Contract Department of the Maryland Workshop for the 
Blind. This is a matter which has been of much concern to the 
division, and it is gratifying to note the increased activity in 
the Workshop. 

Outside of sheltered employment, the best skill for placement 
of the blind continues to be typing, especially transcribing 
medical records. During the year the division was successful in 
cooperating with a private institution in developing a special 
course of training to prepare blind clients for this work. 

Highlighting the year 1962 was the Maryland Conference on 
Vocational Rehabilitation sponsored by the State Board of Educa- 
tion in Baltimore, on May 10. Representatives of industry, labor, 
medicine, welfare, education, compensation, government, public 
and private schools, civic clubs, parent-teacher associations, tele- 



86 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



vision-press-radio, others participated. Attendance was limited to 
247 invited guests representing the above-mentioned groups. 

Critical attention was given to the State program of voca- 
tional rehabilitation — its organization, accomplishments, in- 
adequacies, and future needs. Material for discussion was de- 
veloped over the past two years by the rehabilitation staff. It 
dealt chiefly with the areas of the blind, the severely disabled, 
injured workers, mentally handicapped, rehabilitation facilities, 
and the older disabled worker. 

Recommendations and conclusions coming out of this con- 
ference will form the basis for planning Maryland's approach to 
solving problems of the disabled in the years ahead. 

''Comeback" completed its tenth consecutive year as a bi- 
weekly sustaining public service program on WMAR-TV, Chan- 
nel 2, Baltimore. It is sponsored by the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation and tells the story of disabled persons who have 
overcome their vocational handicaps and are now self-support- 
ing, tax-paying members of society. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



TABLE 1— Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1962 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 




Actual 


Opening 


Closing 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 


Local Unit 


Days 


Schools 


Schools 




Schools 


September 


June 




Schools 


September 


June 




Were Open 


1961 


1962 




Were Open 


1961 


1962 


Allegany 


183 


6 


8 


Harford 


182 


6 


15 


Anne Arundel 


181 


7 


15 




182 


7 


15 


BaltimoreCity 


181 


? 


14 


Hent 


183 


5 


14 


Baltimore. . . . 


181 




15 










Calvert 


180 




14 


Montgomery 


182 


5 


15 










Pr. George's. 


180 


5 


15 


Caroline 


181 


6 


11 


Queen Anne's 


185 


7 


15 


Carroll 


184 


5 


15 


St. Mary's. . . 


180 


6 


14 


Cecil 


183 


5 


15 


Somerset .... 


182 


5 


5 


Charles 


181 


6 


15 










Dorchester. . . 


180 


5 


8 


Talbot 


184 


5 


15 










Washington. . 


181 


6 


8 


Frederick .... 


183 


7 


15 


Wicomico . . . 


184 


5 


13 


Garrett 


182 


5 


8 


Worcester . . . 


181 




8 



88 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 2— Fall Enrollment— Grades N-12, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: 
Public and Nonpublic: State of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


High 


enrollment 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


772,253 
635,657 
136,596 


483,292 
371,404 
111,888 


288,961 
264,253 
24,708 


TEACHING STAFF 


Total 


30,813 
25,978 
4,835 






Public* 

Nonpublic 


13,571 


12,407 








NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Total 

Public* 

Nonpublic 


tl,491 
tl,045 
t446 


1,236 
830 
406 


375 
276 
99 



* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of campus schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



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Caroline 

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Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Prince George's . . 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 
Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



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Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 







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96 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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State Department of Education 



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Damage 


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98 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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99 





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55 


Aides 


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ALLY 
CAPPED 


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ment 


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ment 


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6 


of 
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Enroll- 
ment 




d 


of 

Classes 






Enroll- 
ment 




1 


No. of 
Classes 




erate 


Enroll- 
ment 




Mod 


No. of 

Classes 




Enroll- 
ment 


CiRAND 

Total 


Classes 




Schools 


with 
Special 
Classes 


Local Unit 



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Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 




Maryland State Department of Education 



101 




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Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 











Ending 




Epilept 


M 00 00 CD U5 (N 


Disturbed 
Emotion- 
ally 


t- CO •^1' CD 0> t- O 

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Year 


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Physical 
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Heart 


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30, 1962 




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June 


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myelitis 


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HOPEDICALL 


Congenital 
Deformity 


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Cerebral 
Palsy 


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icapped 




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H 










TABLE 




Year and 
Local Unit 


1955- 56 

1956- 57 

1957- 58 

1958- 59 

1959- 60 

1960- 61 

1961- 62 



e^iH U5N 



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O-H-rfXOS C^OO -CON 



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Other 
Physically 
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Maryland 

eo o> i« ^ !£| 'S' M 

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Brain 
Damage 


-"f 

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Epileptic 




Vision 


in 


Com- 
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Disorderst 


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1^ 


Mentally 
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Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 20— Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools for Atypical Children 
and Institutions: Fall of 1961 







Number of Pupils 


Total 












Number 


Name and Location 












of 




Nursery 


Kinder- 


Ele- 






Different 




School 


garten 


mentary 


High 


Special 


Teachers 


Agnes Bruce Greig School, Bethesda. . 






11 






5 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen Burnie . . 






57 


20 




9 


Benedictine School for Exceptional 














Children, Ridgely 










40 


6 


Boy's Village of Maryland, Inc., 














Cheltenham . . 




40 


158 


25 




13 


Cerebral Palsy Nursery Treatment 














Center, Silver Spring 


6 


6 








5 


Children's Guild, Inc., The, Baltimore. . 


13 


9 








6 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 














In-Patient Dept., Reisterstown 


7 


7 


36 






8 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute 














Out-Patient Dept., Catonsville 


14 


11 


5 






7 


Christ Church Child Center, Bethesda. . 






4 






4 


Edgemere Youth Center, Inc., Olney . 


15 




15 






5 


Friendly School, Baltimore 






26 






4 


Gateway Pre-School, Baltimore 


14 


14 








4 


Houses of Good Shepherd (2), Balti- 




















11 




41 


7 


Linwood Children's Farm, EUicott 














City 






18 






3 


Marc Nursery School, Bethesda 


22 










5 


Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore. . 




12 


175 






41 


Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick . . 


16 


22 


104 


67 




29 


Maryland Training School for Boys, 






279 


203 




25 


Loch Raven 








Montrose School for Girls, Reisters- 














town 






75 


62 




16 


Rosewood State Training School, 












19 


Owings Mills 


23 


66 


164 






St. Elizabeth's School for Special Edu- 














cation, Baltimore 






44 






7 


St. Francis' School for Special Educa- 










80 


13 


tion, Baltimore 










St. Maurice School, Bethesda 










80 


6 


St. Vincent's Infant Home, Baltimore. . 


11 


13 








4 


School of the Chimes, Baltimore 






72 






12 


Searchlight Training Centers (3), 




29 


23 






14 




10 






Wicomico School for Retarded Chil- 












3 


dren, Inc., Salisbury 






12 







* Figures furnished by principals of schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



TABLE 21— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1952-1961 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



Local Unit 


1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


Total State 


63,165 


64,523 


67,445 


69, 205 


72,108 


76,127 


75,997 


77,165 


77,496 


78,190 


Allegany 


1,785 


1,729 


1,577 


1,586 


1,583 


1,664 


1,634 


1,667 


1,690 


1,726 


Anne Arundel . . . 


3.132 


3,444 


3,811 


3,840 


4,036 


4,574 


4,762 


5,058 


5,185 


5,347 


Baltimore City. . 


22,775 


22,748 


23,523 


23,291 


23,782 


25,067 


24,464 


23,893 


23,262 


23,153 


Baltimore 


7,937 


8,547 


9,057 


9,699 


10,701 


11,740 


11,759 


11,993 


12,047 


11,735 


Calvert 


427 


432 


431 


471 


413 


473 


421 


457 


458 


454 


Caroline 


432 


431 


405 


423 


460 


393 


465 


435 


436 


439 


Carroll 


1,019 


888 


921 


984 


995 


1,079 


1,095 


1,110 


1,095 


1,116 


Cecil 


901 


958 


1,054 


1,163 


1,261 


1,437 


1,252 


1,281 


1,287 


1,295 


Charles 


684 


825 


877 


937 


891 


986 


987 


975 


1,023 


1,125 




585 


597 


632 


588 


616 


625 


616 


560 


547 


568 


Frederick 


1,438 


1,430 


1,519 


1,533 


1,597 


1,607 


1,577 


1,602 


1,662 


1,740 


Garrett 


497 


467 


448 


448 


470 


420 


470 


444 


449 


457 




1,789 


1,724 


1,855 


1,982 


1,917 


2,008 


2,042 


2,121 


2,121 


2,218 


Howard 


581 


615 


660 


698 


708 


734 


762 


857 


861 


957 


Kent 


318 


317 


354 


387 


320 


360 


373 


375 


385 


375 


Montgomery 


6,113 


6,275 


6,708 


7,053 


7,394 


7,593 


7,614 


7,848 


8,199 


8,199 


Prince George's. 


7,250 


7,566 


7,687 


8,072 


8,997 


9,416 


9,761 


10,224 


10,572 


11,077 


Queen Anne's. . . 


334 


279 


335 


386 


357 


322 


355 


362 


351 


363 


St. Mary's 


881 


1,029 


1,116 


1,085 


1,046 


1,124 


1,118 


1,430 


1,413 


1,410 


Somerset 


446 


427 


477 


429 


433 


388 


404 


403 


452 


405 


Talbot 


458 


451 


431 


499 


470 


472 


453 


467 


426 


463 


Washington .... 


1,794 


1,771 


1,869 


1,967 


1,929 


1,935 


1,957 


1,894 


1,895 


1,950 




1,002 


1,019 


1,061 


1,094 


1,144 


1,149 


1,091 


1,141 


1,134 


1,089 




587 


554 


637 


590 


588 


561 


565 


568 


546 


529 



108 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 22— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1952-1961 



Local Umit 



White Resident Births in Maryland 



1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


54,548 


56,382 


59,122 


58,862 


59,538 


60,093 


60,697 


1,758 
2,467 
14,989 
7,382 
186 


1,691 
2,734 
14,628 
7,999 
196 


1,540 
3,033 
14,949 
8,560 
169 


1,553 
3,137 
14,366 
9,209 
190 


1,554 
3,324 
14,032 
10,203 
175 


1,638 
3,752 
14,305 
11,146 
196 


1,608 
3,934 
13,380 
11,260 
183 


1,643 
4,197 
12,577 
11,495 
197 


1,671 
4,361 
11,998 
11,605 
196 


1,703 
4,506 
11,942 
11,255 
203 


325 
922 
834 
387 
342 


313 
840 
883 
457 
324 


301 
881 
979 
476 
370 


311 
912 
1,067 
527 
337 


352 
942 
1,173 
494 
327 


278 
1,016 
1,341 
560 
358 


346 
1,040 
1,153 
558 
349 


307 
1,055 
1,176 
549 
336 


304 
1,034 
1,190 
567 
298 


308 
1,048 
1,192 
666 
304 


1,306 
497 

1,557 
480 
224 


1,282 
466 

1,493 
499 
209 


1,369 
448 

1,625 
561 
258 


1,388 
448 

1,763 
582 
257 


1,431 
470 

1,695 
589 
215 


1,468 
420 

1,755 
613 
244 


1,438 
470 

1,804 
649 
247 


1,431 
444 

1,858 
743 
252 


1,488 
449 

1,868 
749 
274 


1,535 
457 

1,956 
852 
266 


5,794 
6,430 
231 
675 
243 


5,899 
6,705 
190 
812 
223 


6,343 
6,782 
226 
877 
264 


6,720 
7,108 
254 
831 
225 


7,010 
7,880 
226 
798 
219 


7,208 
8,290 
205 
831 
197 


7,234 
8,650 
239 
844 
205 


7,450 
9,042 

243 
1,120 

192 


7,768 
9,489 

236 
1,146 

239 


7,804 
9,945 

254 
1,100 

210 


293 
1,769 
733 
322 


301 
1,731 
735 
308 


270 
1,825 
736 
362 


337 
1,925 
771 
330 


301 
1,882 
774 
316 


321 
1,882 
797 
301 


308 
1,909 
773 
281 


324 
1,835 
769 
303 


271 
1,851 
758 
284 


313 
1,897 
729 
252 



Total State 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 
Baltimore City. 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



TABLE 23— Colored Resident Births in Maryland: 1952-1961 



Local Unit 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 





1952 


1953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


1958 


1959 


1960 


1961 


Total State 


13,019 


13,605 


14,241 


14,657 


15,726 


17,005 


17,135 


17,627 


17,403 


17,493 


Allegany 


27 


38 


37 


33 


29 


26 


26 


24 


19 


23 


Anne Arundel . . . 


665 


710 


778 


703 


712 


822 


828 


861 


824 


841 


Baltimore City. . 


7,786 


8,120 


8,574 


8,925 


9,750 


10,762 


11,084 


11,316 


11,264 


11,211 


Baltimore 


555 


548 


497 


490 


498 


594 


499 


498 


442 


480 


Calvert 


241 


236 


262 


281 


238 


277 


238 


260 


263 


251 


Caroline 


107 


118 


104 


112 


108 


115 


119 


128 


132 


131 


Carroll 


97 


48 


40 


72 


53 


63 


55 


55 


61 


68 


Cecil 


67 


75 


75 


96 


88 


96 


99 


105 


97 


103 


Charles 


297 


368 


401 


410 


397 


426 


429 


426 


456 


459 


Dorchester 


243 


273 


262 


251 


289 


267 


267 


224 


249 


264 


Frederick 


132 


148 


150 


145 


166 


139 


139 


171 


174 


205 


Garrett 




1 


















Harford 


232 


231 


230 


219 


222 


253 


238 


263 


253 


262 


Howard 


101 


116 


99 


116 


119 


121 


113 


114 


112 


105 


Kent 


94 


108 


96 


130 


105 


116 


126 


123 


111 


109 


Montgomery 


319 


376 


365 


333 


384 


385 


380 


398 


431 


395 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


820 


861 


905 


964 


1,117 


1,126 


1,111 


1,182 


1,083 


1,132 


103 


89 


109 


132 


131 


117 


116 


119 


115 


109 


St. Mary's 


206 


217 


239 


254 


248 


293 


274 


310 


267 


310 


Somerset 


203 


204 


213 


204 


214 


191 


199 


211 


213 


195 


Talbot 


165 


150 


161 


162 


169 


151 


145 


143 


155 


150 


Washington .... 


25 


40 


44 


42 


47 


53 


48 


59 


44 


53 


Wicomico 


269 


284 


325 


323 


370 


352 


318 


372 


376 


360 


Worcester 


265 


246 


275 


260 


272 


260 


284 


265 


262 


277 



110 Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 

TABLE 24 



Withdrawals* from Public Schools: Counties of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1962 















Withdrawals by Code! 










Local Unit 


Total 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W5 


W6 


W7 


W8 


W9 


WIO 


Wll 


W12 


W13 


WU 



ELEMENTARY 







8,922 


340 


13,040 


224 




85 


30 


39 


284 


4 


4 


34 


2 


Allegany 


554 


288 


3 


237 


10 




1 


12 










3 




Anne Arundel 


3,110 


1,024 


27 


1,970 


35 




15 


3 


5 


23 


"i 


i 


5 


i 


Baltimore 


3,756 


1,224 


77 


2,316 


58 




21 


• ■ 


2 


51 


1 




6 




Calvert 


199 


58 




133 


1 




1 


1 


1 


4 










Caroline 


175 


55 




110 


3 




1 






5 










Carroll 


491 


170 


3 


288 


10 




1 


2 


1 


10 


2 




3 




Cecil 


779 


263 


7 


484 


8 




4 






12 






1 




Charles 


348 


99 


4 


227 


3 




2 


2 


3 


8 










Dorchester 


126 


35 




86 






2 






3 










Frederick 


619 


290 


5 


300 


3 




1 


1 


1 


17 






i 




Garrett 


140 


51 


3 


71 


1 






4 




9 




1 






Harford 


1,233 


506 


3 


688 


10 




1 




2 


22 






i 




Howard 


462 


78 


3 


366 


8 




2 






5 










Kent 


134 


23 




105 










5 


1 










Montgomery 


3,675 


1,663 


114 


1,835 


14 




7 


i 


6 


32 




1 


2 




Prince George's .... 


4,751 


2,161 


68 


2,410 


37 




16 




5 


47 






7 






182 


33 




138 






6 






4 






1 




St. Mary's 


538 


104 


6 


413 


8 










6 






1 




Somerset 


125 


23 




95 


2 






i 


2 








2 




Talbot 


148 


72 


2 


70 


1 




i 


1 




i 










Washington 


760 


447 


14 


276 


3 




1 




2 


16 






1 




Wicomico 


502 


213 


1 


270 


9 




2 


1 


3 


2 




i 






Worcester 


201 


42 




152 










1 


6 











HIGH 



Total Counties. . , 


14,983 


2,579 


101 


5,554 


298 


208 


420 


4,372 


42 


715 


87 


531 


49 


27 


Allegany 


392 


60 


12 


111 


12 


5 


7 


113 




32 




36 


3 


1 


Anne Arundel 


1,910 


185 


7 


808 


30 


32 


50 


630 


6 


93 


'i 


58 


3 


1 


Baltimore 


2,725 


301 


21 


993 


102 


84 


122 


888 


6 


94 


34 


70 


10 




Calvert 


119 


2 




32 


1 




3 


64 


2 


11 




2 


1 




Caroline 


456 


332 




60 


1 


4 


2 


40 




10 




7 






Carroll 


350 


44 




117 


20 


4 


3 


120 




19 


7 


15 




1 


Cecil 


415 


39 




147 


12 


3 


13 


165 




12 


1 


21 


i 




Charles 


296 


15 


5 


105 


4 


1 


8 


108 




34 




14 


2 




Dorchester 


143 


5 




62 


5 


1 


5 


41 


i 


13 


1 


3 


4 


'2 


Frederick 


543 


106 


4 


146 


7 


3 


11 


182 


5 


28 


10 


28 


2 


11 


Garrett 


120 


6 




36 


3 


1 


4 


49 




12 




9 






Harford 


643 


102 


4 


260 


7 


7 


22 


155 


1 


35 


io 


37 


i 


2 


Howard 


290 


10 


2 


144 


2 


3 


9 


90 




19 




11 






Kent 


112 


7 




47 


5 


1 


7 


30 




8 




7 






Montgomery 


2,235 


656 


22 


868 


23 


30 


54 


390 


i4 


94 


10 


59 


9 


6 


Prince George's ... 


2,604 


542 


10 


1,059 


36 


20 


57 


703 


1 


78 


2 


86 


10 




Queen Anne's 


133 


5 




67 




1 


3 


54 




5 




7 




1 


St. Mary's 


313 


17 


2 


160 


2 


2 


4 


103 




15 




8 






Somerset 


119 


2 




27 


11 




2 


53 


1 


9 




14 






Talbot 


116 


2 




39 




1 


6 


48 




11 




9 






Washington 

Wicomico 


566 


127 


9 


137 


9 




20 


219 


3 


28 


2 


9 


2 


1 


241 


11 


3 


79 


5 


2 


7 


89 


2 


30 




12 


1 




Worcester 


142 


3 




60 




3 


1 


38 




25 


2 


9 







* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1961-62 the school from which they withdrew — excluding kindergarten. 

t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county W 8 — Age 16 or over 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic schoool in county W 9 — Mental 

W3 & 4 — Transferred— Outside county WIO — Physical 
W5 — Special case Wll — Economic 

W6 — Armed services W12 — Marriago 

W7— Committed to institution W13— Death 

W 14 — Suspended 



Maryland State Department of Education 



111 



TABLE 25 — Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: 
State of Maryland: 1953-1962 



Year and 
Local Unit 


Average Number Belonging per Teacher 
and Principal 


Total 


Elementary* 


High 


1953 


27 


.5 


31.9 


21 .8 


1954 


27 


.4 


31.5 


22.0 


1955 


26 


.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1956 


26 


.8 


30.4 


22.0 


1957 


26 


.3 


30.0 


21.7 


1958 


25 


.1 


28.0 


21 . 5 


1959 


24 


.6 


27.3 


21.4 


1960 


24 


.2 


26.9 


21.2 


1961 


23 


.9 


26.6 


21 . 


1962 


25 


.1 


28.2 


21 .9 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 


1961-1962 




Allegany 


24 


8 


27.3 


22 . 8 


Anne Arundel 


23 


9 


25.9 


21 . 6 


Baltimore City 


25 


9 


29.7 


21.9 


Baltimore 


23 


2 


24.9 


21 4 


Calvert 


24 


3 


28.1 


19^5 


Caroline 


22 


8 


28.9 


17.9 


Carroll 


23 


6 


30.1 


18.6 


Cecil 


24 


1 


27.2 


20.5 


Charles 


24 


6 


28.1 


21.0 


Dorchester 


25 


2 


29.2 


21.5 


Frederick 


21 


8 


24.5 


19.3 


Garrett 


25 


1 


26.0 


24.0 


Harford 


24 


2 


26.8 


21.4 


Howard 


23 


4 


24.5 


22.1 


Kent 


21 


9 


25.5 


18.4 


Montgomery 


20 


8 


21.9 


19.6 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


24 


1 


27.5 


20.6 


22 


2 


26.2 


18.4 


St. Mary's 


22 


8 


27.3 


18.5 


Somerset 


23 


1 


26.9 


19.3 


Talbot 


23 


1 


26.8 


19.4 


Washington 


24 


7 


26.7 


22.8 


Wicomico 


25 


1 


27.7 


21.9 




22. 


5 


26.7 


18.4 


* Excludes kindergarten and campus schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



112 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 26 — Number and Per Cent Nonpromotions : Maryland County High 
School Pupils: June Net Roll, 1962 



Local Unit 


June Net Roll 


Per Cent 
not Promoted 


Total 


Promoted 


Not Promoted 


Total Counties 


191,855 


181,981 


9,874 


5 


1 


Allegany 


8,009 


7,859 


150 


1 


9 


Anne Arundel 


17,784 


16,611 


1,173 


6 


6 




39,471 


37,698 


1,773 


4 


5 


Calvert 


1,609 


1,527 


82 


5 


1 


Caroline 


1,836 


1,807 


29 


1 


6 


Carroll 


4,822 


4,650 


172 


3 


6 


Cecil 


3,777 


3,476 


301 


8 





Charles 


3,128 


2,699 


429 


13 


7 


Dorchester 


2,682 


2,576 


106 


3 


9 


Frederick 


6,522 


6,219 


303 


4 


6 


Garrett 


1,983 


1,913 


70 


3 


5 


Harford 


7,365 


6,939 


426 


5 


8 


Howard 


3,496 


3,309 


187 


5 


3 


Kent 


1,375 


1,286 


89 


6 


5 


Montgomery 


33,882 


32,625 


1,257 


3 


7 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


31,574 


29,298 


2,276 


7 


2 


1,587 


1,439 


148 


9 


3 


St. Mary's 


2,359 


2,133 


226 


9 


6 




1,803 


1,673 


130 


7 


2 


Talbot 


1,715 


1,656 


59 


3 


4 


Washington 


8,652 


8,427 


225 


2 


6 




4,233 


4,054 


179 


4 


2 


Worcester 


2,191 


2,107 


84 


3 


8 



Note: Policy of promotion and nonpromotion varies in the different counties. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



113 



TABLE 27 — Number, Per Cent, and Causes of Nonpromotion : IVIaryland 
County Elementary Pupils*: June Net Roll, 1962 











Number not Promoted by Cause 




Total 


Per Cent 










Local Unit 


not 


not 












Promoted 


Promoted 








All OfViPr 














uny 


Causes 












dancef 






10 660 


4 


2 


129 


390 


9,120 


1,021 


Allegany 


100 


1 


2 


4 


2 


94 




Anne Arundel 


1,285 


5 





20 


43 


1,213 


9 


Baltimore 


3,051 


6 


1 


21 


36 


2,362 


632 


Calvert 


312 


10 


8 


2 


22 


284 


4 


Caroline 


90 


3 


5 


2 


4 


84 




Carroll 


203 


3 


3 


4 


13 


182 


4 


Cecil 


410 


7 


2 


9 


23 


373 


5 


Charles 


398 


8 


9 


5 


97 


294 


2 


Dorchester 


58 


1 


7 


1 




57 




Frederick 


65 





8 


6 


6 


48 


5 


Garrett 


140 


5 


1 


7 


15 


113 


5 


Harford 


507 


5 


2 


5 


20 


445 


37 


Howard 


147 


3 


1 


2 


11 


131 


3 


Kent 


94 


4 


9 






55 


39 


Montgomery 


821 


1 


9 


io 


12 


547 


252 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


1,625 


3 


7 


17 


47 


1,550 


11 


77 


3 


5 


1 




75 




St. Mary's 


331 


9 


7 


8 


30 


292 


1 


Somerset 


163 


6 


5 


2 


2 


155 


4 


Talbot 


245 


9 


9 


1 


2 


238 


4 


Washington 


188 


1 


9 




2 


183 


3 


Wicomico 


264 


4 


2 


2 




262 




Worcester 


86 


2 


7 




3 


83 





* Excludes kindergarten and pupils attending campus schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Irregular attendance due to unfortunate home conditions. 
t Immaturity — social, intellectual, emotional. 



114 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 28 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Counties of Maryland: June Net Roll, 1962 



Local Unit 


First Grade Enrollment 


Number and Per Cent not Promoted 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total Counties. . 


46,644 


24,420 


22,224 


3,905 


2,493 


1,412 


8.4 


10.2 


6.3 


Allegany 


1,354 


716 


638 


60 


40 


20 


4.3 


5.6 


3.1 


Anne Arundel . 


4,822 


2,542 


2,280 


534 


328 


206 


11.1 


12.9 


9.0 


Baltimore. . . . 


9,149 


4,854 


4,295 


869 


590 


279 


9.5 


12.1 


6.5 


Calvert 


559 


296 


263 


66 


42 


24 


11.8 


14.2 


9.1 


Caroline 


448 


221 


227 


43 


23 


20 


9.6 


10.4 


8.8 


Carroll 


1,126 


598 


528 


101 


63 


38 


9.0 


10.5 


7.2 


Cecil 


1,223 


664 


559 


236 


151 


85 


19.3 


22.7 


15.2 


Charles 


858 


464 


394 


141 


86 


55 


16.4 


18.5 


13.9 


Dorchester .... 


595 


303 


292 


32 


20 


12 


5.4 


6.6 


4.1 


Frederick 


1,345 


687 


658 


38 


27 


11 


2.8 


3.9 


1.7 


Garrett 


461 


234 


227 


46 


29 


17 


10.0 


12.4 


7.5 


Harford 


1,814 


959 


855 


158 


103 


55 


8.7 


10.7 


6.4 


Howard 


874 


452 


422 


74 


45 


29 


8.5 


9.9 


6.9 


Kent 


380 


200 


180 














Montgomery. . 


7,679 


3,930 


3,749 


268 


182 


86 


3.5 


4^6 


2.3 


PrinceGeorge's 


8,369 


4,388 


3,981 


753 


460 


293 


9.0 


10.5 


7.3 


Queen Anne's . 


486 


249 


237 


16 


9 


7 


3.3 


3.6 


2.9 


St. Mary's. . . . 


636 


353 


283 


94 


58 


36 


14.8 


16.4 


12.7 


Somerset 


448 


248 


200 


56 


39 


17 


12.5 


15.7 


8.6 


Talbot 


511 


271 


240 


122 


78 


44 


23.9 


28.8 


18.3 


Washington . . . 


1,818 


910 


908 


50 


31 


19 


2.7 


3.4 


2.1 


Wicomico 


1,104 


583 


521 


95 


58 


37 


8.6 


9.9 


7.1 


Worcester. . . . 


585 


298 


287 


53 


31 


22 


9.1 


10.4 


7.7 



* Excludes pupils in first grade of campus schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



115 



TABLE 29— Public High School Graduates: State of Maryland— 1953-62: 
by Local Unit— Year Ending June 30, 1962 



High School Graduates 



Year and Local Unit 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 




13,356 


6,256 


7 100 


1 QS3— 


14,070 


6,670 


7*400 




15,161 


7,313 


7*848 


1955-56 


16,767 


8,019 


8)748 


1956-57 


17,122 


8,368 


8,754 


1957-58 


18,380 


8,891 


9 489 




20,462 


9,861 


10601 




23,854 


11,560 


12 294 


1960-61 


26,923 


13,142 


13,781 


1961-62 


26,533 


13,015 


13,518 


BY 


LOCAL UNIT, 1961-62 




Allegany 


933 


472 


461 


Anne Arundel 


1,755 


837 


918 


Baltimore City 


5,625 


2,791 


2,834 


Baltimore 


4,360 


2,142 


2,218 


Calvert 


162 


73 


89 


Caroline 


229 


122 


107 


Carroll 


513 


243 


270 


Cecil 


360 


162 


198 




318 


159 


159 


Dorchester 


327 


149 


178 


Frederick 


662 


317 


345 


Garrett 


247 


121 


126 


Harford 


860 


417 


443 


Howard 


357 


169 


188 


Kent 


165 


67 


98 


Montgomery 


3,840 


1,942 


1,898 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


3,361 


1,620 


1,741 


174 


94 


80 


St. Mary's 


238 


108 


130 


Somerset 


186 


94 


92 


Talbot 


197 


94 


103 


Washington 


966 


481 


485 


Wicomico 


487 


242 


245 


Worcester 


211 


99 


112 



116 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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144 Ninety-Sixth Annual Keport 



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147 



TABLE 50 — Enrollment in Driver Education: Maryland County High Schools: 

Fall of 1961 



Local Unit 


Total Driver 
Education 


Driver Education 


Classroom 


Practice 


Classroom 
and 
Practice 


Total Counties 


7,312 


2,589 


781 


3,942 


Allegany 


471 






471 


Anne Arundel 










Baltimore 


1,430 


334 


230 


866 


Calvert 












ioi 


167 






Carroll 










Cecil 


157 


i57 






Charles 










Dorchester 


i44 


54 


'54 


36 


Frederick 


599 


599 
















Harford 


69i 


226 


147 


3i8 


Howard 










Kent 


i42 


U2 






Montgomery 


1,098 






1,098 


Prince George's 


665 






665 


307 


120 


Us 


69 


St. Mary's 


169 






169 


Somerset 










Talbot 


i75 


80 


'95 




Washington 


257 


24 


24 


209 


Wicomico 


684 


530 


113 


41 




216 


216 







148 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 51 — Number of Different Individuals Teaching and Number of Public High 
Schools Offering Each Subject: Counties of Maryland: Fall of 1961 



Local Unit 


English 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Other 
Foreign 
Lan- 
guages 


Social 
Studies 


Mathe- 
matics 


Science 


Business 
Educa- 
tion 


Arts 
and 
Crafts 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 






<i> 




2 




a/ 




CO 

dJ 


to 










S 

a; 




E 




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m 








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o 
















u 









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1 


e3 
<u 


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1 


c3 



1 


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C4 

H 


1 

CO 


u 

<u 


1 

CO 


a 
cS 
a> 
El 





TO 


1 otal Louiities. . . . 


2,574 


232 


110 


97 


292 


173 


108 


72 


14 


14 


2,239 


232 


1,469 


232 


1,537 


232 


599 


142 


105 


70 


Allegany 


96 


11 


7 


5 


6 


6 


2 


2 






77 


11 


58 


11 


47 


11 


27 


3 


3 


3 


Anne Arundel... 


278 


14 


6 


5 


24 


12 


5 


4 


*2 


*2 


267 


14 


205 


14 


196 


14 


52 


g 


1 


1 


Daltimore 


519 


28 


20 


18 


49 


28 


28 


22 


tl 


f2 


460 


28 


241 


28 


260 


28 


80 


13 


41 


19 


Calvert 




A 
1 




]^ 


A 
1 


3 








A 




A 


10 


4 


8 


2 


2 


2 


Caroline 


29 


7 


3 


3 


2 


2 










29 


7 


15 


7 


21 


7 


19 


4 






Carroll 


61 


14 


1 


1 


8 


7 










52 


14 


45 


14 


44 


14 


20 


7 


5 


4 


Cecil 


47 


7 


3 


3 


4 


4 


'2 








45 


7 


34 


7 


33 


7 


20 


6 


1 


1 


Charles 


39 


8 


2 


2 


4 


4 










46 


8 


31 


8 


31 


8 


14 


4 


3 


3 


Dorchester 


32 


6 


3 


4 


3 


3 










32 


6 


21 


6 


20 


6 


12 


4 






Frederick 


112 


10 


5 


5 


10 


8 


1 








91 


10 


55 


10 


49 


10 


25 


7 


"8 


7 




26 


4 






2 


2 










24 

96 


4 


14 


4 


15 


4 


7 


2 


5 


3 




110 


8 


'6 


'5 


10 


7 


3 








8 


63 


8 


65 


8 


27 


7 


9 


5 




44 


7 


4 


3 


6 


5 


1 








42 


7 


27 


7 


29 


7 


12 


3 






Kent 


24 


4 


2 


2 


3 


3 










26 


4 


15 


4 


15 


4 


8 


4 


'i 


'i 


Montgomery . . . 


377 


26 


24 


21 


87 


25 


26 




*5 


*5 


274 


26 


233 


26 


174 


26 


80 


17 


11 


7 


Prince George's. 


457 


33 


8 


8 


37 


23 


35 


21 


t*4 


t*3 


406 


33 


189 


33 


321 


33 


92 


13 


4 


3 


Queen Anne's. . . 


28 


4 






4 


4 










22 


4 


14 


4 


18 


4 


11 


4 


1 


1 


St. Mary's 


38 


6 


'i 


'i 


4 


4 


3 








27 


6 


24 


6 


24 


6 


12 


5 






Somerset 


22 


7 






5 


5 










27 


7 


22 


7 


19 


7 


12 


6 






Talbot 


19 

94 
53 
38 


3 

12 
5 
4 


'i 

8 
5 


'i 

6 

3 


3 

8 
4 
5 


3 

7 
4 
4 










19 

81 
44 
28 


3 

12 
5 
4 


14 

72 
38 
20 


3 

12 
5 
4 


17 

70 
34 
20 


3 

12 
5 
4 


10 

26 
15 
10 


3 

7 
4 
4 


6 
1 

3 


5 
1 
4 


Washington .... 
Worcester 


3 
4 


2 
2 


*2 


*2 





Art 


Music 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Eco- 
nomics 


Physical 
Educa- 
tion 


Industrial 
Work 


Driver 
Education 


Adminis- 
tration, 
Super- 
vision 


Guidance 


Library 




Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Number 
of 


Local Unit 




Cj 


1 


m 
<v 
ja 

OS 


1 


2 

O) 

cS 


CO 




to 

i 


CO 




2 

-CS 


m 



2 


re 



2 

<i> 

JS 

1 


to 

§ 


2 


to 



2 

a 


to 

1 


CO 

a> 
J3 
CS 


JS 






<u 


s 


a> 
H 


s 


u 






CO 








J3 


CO 


H 


.a 

CO 




CO 


H 




a; 

H 


JS 

a 
CO 


'otal Counties 


296 


176 


552 


227 


66 


61 


458 


216 


881 


232 


589 


213 


111 


94 


945 


227 


429 


218 


296 


217 


Allegany 


13 


8 


19 


11 


1 




19 


9 


30 


11 


25 


9 


7 


6 


23 


11 


12 


8 


12 


9 


Anne Arundel. . . 
Baltimore 


31 
59 


14 

28 


42 
94 


14 

28 


1 
1 




42 
80 


12 
28 


53 
160 


14 

28 


50 
114 


12 
28 


i6 


i3 


59 
250 
19 


14 

28 


31 
83 


14 

28 


17 
56 


13 
28 


Calvert 


2 


2 


10 


4 


1 




4 


2 


10 


4 


3 


2 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 




6 


6 


11 
28 


7 


5 




8 


7 


16 


7 


9 


7 


"2 


'2 


8 


7 


8 


7 


8 


7 


Carroll 


2 


2 


14 


3 


3 


17 


14 


32 


14 


19 


13 






24 


14 


14 


13 


15 


14 


Cecil 


5 


5 


11 


7 


2 


2 


11 


7 


26 


7 


13 
8 




'7 


'4 


17 


7 


11 


7 


6 


6 


Charles 


4 


3 


13 


7 


6 


5 


10 


7 


21 


8 


7 






10 


7 


7 


6 


7 


6 


Dorchester 

Frederick 


2 
12 


3 

10 


10 
25 


5 

10 


2 
5 


3 
5 


5 
15 


4 

10 


17 
39 


6 

10 


5 
16 


4 

10 


'4 

7 


'3 

7 


10 
25 


5 
9 


6 
13 


5 
10 

2 


6 
15 


6 

10 


Garrett 


7 


3 


3 


2 


5 


2 


12 


4 


4 


2 




6 


4 


3 


5 


3 


Harford 


ii 


'8 


22 


8 


3 


2 


17 
9 


8 


26 


8 


24 


8 


'7 


'7 


16 


8 


14 


8 


12 


8 


Howard 


4 


4 


16 


7 


2 


2 


5 


17 


7 


13 


5 






13 


7 


14 


6 


5 


5 


Kent 


1 


2 


7 


4 


2 


2 


6 


4 


8 


4 


5 


4 


'3 


'4 


6 


4 


5 


4 


3 


3 


Montgomery . . . 


51 


25 


70 


26 


5 


4 


66 


26 


159 


26 


111 


26 


20 


11 


254 


26 


90 


26 


44 


25 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 
St. Mary's 


66 

6 
1 


33 

'6 

1 


94 
8 
9 
5 


33 
4 
6 
5 


3 
3 
2 
2 


3 
3 
2 
2 


85 
5 
6 
4 
5 


33 
4 
6 
4 


155 
8 
12 
16 


33 
4 
6 
7 


99 
3 
6 
3 


33 
3 
6 
3 


12 
3 
4 


11 
4 

5 


139 
5 
9 
7 


33 
4 
6 
6 


63 
6 
6 

8 


32 
4 
6 
6 


32 
4 
6 

15 


32 
4 
6 
6 


Talbot 






4 


3 


3 


2 


3 


6 


3 


6 


3 


'2 


'2 


6 


3 


4 


3 


3 


3 


Washington .... 


10 
7 


8 

1 5 


28 
10 


12 
5 


5 
4 


4 
4 


24 

9 


12 
5 


34 
16 
8 


12 
5 


34 
11 


12 
5 


7 
6 


7 
4 


25 
9 


11 

5 


14 
8 


11 
5 


11 
5 


11 

5 




3 


3 


9 


4 


2 


3 


6 


4 


4 


8 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


3 


3 


3 



* German. 



1 nussian. 

X Includes 1 teacher and 1 school teaching Russian and 3 teachers and 2 schools teaching German. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



149 



TABLE 52 — Number and Per Cent of IVIen Teachers: 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1962 



Year Ending 
June 30 




Number 


AND Per Cent Men Teachers 




Total 


Elementary 


High 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


1,048 


14.2 


591 


9.3 


457 


43.3 


1928 


1,136 


13.8 


574 


8.4 


562 


39.6 


1933 


1,347 


16.1 


617 


9.4 


730 


41.4 


1938 


1,613 


18.6 


766 


11.5 


847 


41.8 


1943 


1,464 


16.6 


561 


8.8 


903 


36.8 


1953 


3,628 


25.3 


822 


10.2 


2,806 


44.9 


1954 


3,885 


25.1 


866 


9.8 


3,019 


45.4 


1955 


4,406 


26.2 


1,019 


10.6 


3,387 


46.7 


1956 


4,818 


27.0 


1,098 


11.0 


3,720 


47.3 


1957 


5,114 


26.7 


1,074 


10.2 


4,040 


46.9 


1958 


5,612 


27.3 


1,175 


10.3 


4,437 


48.5 


1959 


6,127 


28.4 


1,373 


11.7 


4,754 


48.4 


1960 


6,932 


30.2 


1,488 


12.3 


5,444 


50.4 


1961 


7,446 


30.2 


1,869 


14.4 


5,577 


47.9 


1962 


7,853 


30.3 


1,593 


11.8 


6,260 


50.5 



150 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 53 — Number and Per Cent of Schools, Teachers, Pupils: One-Teacher* 
Elementary Schools: Counties of Maryland : 1923-1962 



One-Teacher Elementary Schools* 



Year Ending 












June 30 


Number of 


Per Cent of 


Per Cent of 


Pupils in One- 


Per Cent of 




One-Teacher 


Total Ele- 


Total Ele- 


Teacher 


Total Ele- 




Schools 


mentary 


mentary 


Schools 


mentary 






Schools 


Teachers 




Pupils 


1923 


1,496 


69.9 


39.6 


t 




1928 


1,206 


65.1 


31.7 


t 




1933 


740 


53.2 


20.3 


t 




1938 


560 


48.1 


15.4 


t 




1943 


275 


31.4 


7.8 


7,546 


'5.S 


1953 


59 


8.7 


1.1 


1,450 


0.9 


1954 


50 


7.5 


0.8 


1,295 


0.7 


1955 


30 


4.5 


0.5 


753 


0.4 


1956 


24 


3.7 


0.3 


595 


0.3 


1957 


23 


3.9 


0.3 


584 


0.3 


1958 


17 


2.1 


0.3 


410 


0.2 


1959 


11 


1.2 


0.1 


278 


0.1 


1960 


12 


1.8 


0.1 


300 


0.1 


1961 


10 


1.3 


0.1 


281 


0.1 


1962 


10 


1.5 


0.1 


267 


0.1 


BY LOCAL UNIT, 1961-1962 


Dorchester 


8 


33.3 


6.9 


216 


6.1 


Somerset 


1 


6.7 


1.1 


21 


0.8 


Talbot 


1 


8.3 


1.1 


30 


1.1 



* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more, 
t Data unavailable. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



TABLE 54 — Number of Public Schools: Number of Teachers and Principals: State of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Number of 
Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


All Schools 


AUegany 


Anne Arundel 


Baltimore City 


Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


Carroll 


Cecil 


Charles 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Garrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 


Prince George's 


Queen Anne's | 


i St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 


Washington 


Wicomico 


1 Worcester ' 
















ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1- 


6) 






















All Sf>lini->lc! 


829 


29 


60 


146 


79 


13 


9 


19 


18 


12 


24 


28 


17 


21 


14 


11 


96 


109 


10 


16 


15 


12 


38 


20 


13 


10-19 


11 




8 




1 
1 




1 


1 


2 0-29 


25 


1 








3 










4 


i 


'5 




2 






1 


2 


2 


1 




1 


3 0-39 


38 


2 


1 


1 








1 


1 




4 


3 


3 




1 


4 




2 


2 


1 


2 


1 
• ■ 


3 


• • 
3 


3 


4 0-49 


27 


• • 


2 


2 


• • 




1 


1 






1 






1 






3 




2 


2 


5 


3 


2 


5 0-59 


29 


2 


2 


2 


1 


• • 




'2 


2 


i 


'2 


1 
1 


i 






1 




4 




1 


1 


2 


4 


• • 




6 0-69 


29 


1 


1 


2 


2 


'2 






3 


1 


3 






1 




2 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 


2 




7 0-79 


30 


3 


3 


• ■ 


1 


1 


1 


'2 


'2 






2 












6 


1 


1 


1 




2 


1 




8 0-89 


31 


5 


2 


4 


1 




2 












'1 








3 


6 




3 


1 
1 




2 






9 0-99 


32 


2 


4 


1 


2 


• • 

2 




2 


3 


1 
1 




1 


1 








• ■ 


5 




1 


• • 
1 


3 






in O-lfi Q 


36 


2 


3 


3 


1 

• • 


3 




3 


1 


i 


4 








4 


5 


1 
1 








2 


1 




11 0-11 9 


27 


1 


4 


6 






1 




1 


2 






1 




1 


3 




1 




2 


2 




19 0-199 


43 


2 


2 


8 


3 






1 




1 


1 




i 




2 




8 


8 


1 


■ • 


1 


1 


2 






13 0-13 9 


35 


2 


2 


6 


2 






1 


'2 


1 




i 


2 




1 




5 


4 


1 


2 






1 


• • 




14 0-14 9 


41 


2 


2 


5 


2 






1 
2 


1 


1 










1 




9 


5 




1 




1 


2 


3 




1 F, 0-1 Ft Q 


37 


1 


3 


4 








1 




3 






1 




7 


6 








1 


3 






1 fi 0-1 fi Q 


34 


1 


4 


5 


'2 






1 


2 






1 








6 


8 




i 




1 


i 




17 0-17 9 


38 




2 


6 


2 






1 








1 










8 


8 










1 






18 0-18 9 


20 






4 


4 






1 








1 










3 


4 










1 


i 




19 0-19 9 


31 






6 




















1 




8 


11 










1 


1 




20 0-20 9 


20 






7 


'1 














'i 








5 


2 










1 




21 0-21 9 


21 






4 


3 


















i 




4 


6 














22 0-22 9 


13 






4 


2 














i 






1 




1 


2 
















9*^ 0-9.'? Q 


21 




6 


6 


4 






















4 


1 
















24 0-24 9 


13 




3 


2 


2 














i 










2 


3 
















25.0-25.9 


17 




3 


3 


3 
























4 


1 
















26.0-26.9 


15 
16 




2 


5 


4 


























2 
















27.0-27.9 






9 


1 
























'3 


1 
















28.0-28.9 


12 






5 


4 


























1 
















29.0-29.9 


17 






5 


7 
























'4 
















30.0-30.9 


10 






4 


3 
5 
























3 


















31.0-31.9 


11 






5 










































32.0-32.9 


11 
6 






5 


2 










































33.0-33.9 






3 


3 










































34.0-34.9 


6 






2 


2 










































35.0-and over 


26 






12 


12 

























































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 



All Schools 


285 

3 
7 
7 

10 
8 
12 
3 
7 
6 
9 
10 
11 
17 
23 
21 
14 
14 
15 
10 
13 
11 
7 

12 
7 
3 
4 
6 

15 


11 


14 


50 


29 


4 


8 


14 


7 


8 


7 

1 
1 


10 


4 

1 
1 


8 


7 


4 


26 


33 


4 


6 


7 
1 


3 


12 


5 


4 


1.0- 2.9 


3.0- 4.9 


i 
1 
1 

2 




1 
1 
1 
1 
4 






1 


1 
1 

2 
2 
1 




1 
2 




1 
1 




















5.0- 6.9 












1 
1 




1 






7.0- 8.9 




2 


2 
1 
2 














1 






9.0-10.9 


1 


1 


1 


1 




















11.0-12.9 








2 










1 










13.0-14.9 


1 
























15.0-16.9 


i 
1 


3 
1 
1 








1 






1 










1 














1 
1 


'2 
"2 


17,0-18.9 












1 








1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 








19.0-20.9 


























1 


1 

i 
1 


1 

'i 


2 
1 
2 
1 
3 


21.0-22.9 






1 


2 


'2 
1 
2 
1 


1 








1 


1 
1 
1 
2 


1 




23.0-24.9 


i 

'2 
1 

i 
1 


i 
1 

i 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 

i 


1 
2 
3 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 

i 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
12 












25.0-29.9 








3 


"i 

2 


1 
2 


2 
1 
3 


i 


'2 
2 


1 


1 
1 

1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 
3 
1 


6 
2 
7 
5 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 


30.0-34.9 


'2 


1 
1 


1 


35.0-39.9 










40.0-44.9 








1 






45.0-49.9 

50.0-54.9 


2 
5 
2 
5 
2 
2 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 






1 










1 










1 
1 




55.0-59.9 








1 
1 




















60.0-64.9 
















2 




















65.0-69.9 






















2 


] 




70.0-74.9 
































75.0-79.9 
























2 
1 
















80.0-84.9 






































85.0-89.9 
























1 
1 
















90.0-94.9 

95.0-99.9 
























1 
















100.0 and over 
























3 



























































152 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 55 — Number of Public Schools : Average Number Belonging: State of Maryland 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Average 

Number 
Belonqino 


All Schools 


Allegany 1 


Anne Arundel 


Baltimore City | 


1 Baltimore 


Calvert 


Caroline 


CarroU 


Cecil 


Charles 1 


Dorchester 


Frederick 


Clarrett 


Harford 


Howard 


Kent 


Montgomery 1 


Prince George's 


Queen Anne's 


St. Mary's 


Somerset 


Talbot 1 


Washington 


Wicomico | 


Worcester II 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS (1-6) 


All Schools 


829 


29 
1 


60 


146 


79 


13 


9 


19 


18 


12 


24 
6 


28 


17 


21 


14 


11 


96 


109 


10 


16 


15 


12 


38 


20 


13 
1 




16 
29 










1 


1 


1 


3 




1 


1 


31- 60 




1 


4 




2 










6 


'i 


4 


'i 


'2 


1 


*i 

2 


'2 


2 


'i 




1 


61- 90 


36 


'2 


1 


2 




1 




1 






4 


3 


1 


*2 


4 




2 




2 


'i 


3 


'3 


2 


91- 120 


30 




2 


1 


"2 






'2 






2 


2 


'i 


1 


1 


'i 






■3 


1 


6 


3 


2 


121- 150 


22 


'2 


3 


1 


1 




1 




1 


'i 


'i 


1 


1 




'2 






2 


'3 


2 






151- 180 


38 


1 


4 


1 




'2 


1 


'i 


2 


2 


1 


2 








4 


4 


'i 


"2 


2 


3 


3 


'2 




181- 210 


27 
31 


3 


2 


1 




1 


1 


1 


'i 


1 




2 


1 


2 




1 


2 


3 


1 


1 






2 


1 




211- 240 


4 


1 


'2 


1 


1 


1 




3 


1 






4 


6 


3 


'2 




2 




241- 270 


39 


4 


3 


'4 


3 


'i 


2 


3 


2 






1 


1 


1 






1 


7 


*i 


1 






2 


"i 


*i 


271- 300 


37 


2 


7 


1 


2 


4 






2 


'2 


'i 


1 


1 


'i 


i 


4 


5 




i 


2 






"in 

oU 




1 
1 




A 
% 






q 







1 






4 


5 


2 




1 


2 


2 


1 


331- 360 


42 
46 


'2 


8 


2 






3 


"3 


'i 


2 


1 




2 




10 


5 






1 


*i 


1 




361- 390 


1 


'3 


6 


1 








2 


1 


'i 


1 


2 


'i 


2 




10 


10 
6 




'2 


2 




'i 


391- 420 


41 


2 


4 


5 


3 


2 


1 


1 




1 


3 




2 


1 




3 


"i 


1 




'i 


1 


■3 


421- 450 


42 


2 


5 


2 


3 




3 






2 




2 


i 


4 


7 


1 


1 


"i 


1 


4 


1 


'2 


451- 480 


25 


1 


1 


6 








1 












1 


i 


8 


3 




1 
2 


2 


481- 510 


26 




2 


7 


2 




1 




1 


1 






1 


1 




3 


4 










"i 




511- 540 


28 






4 


3 




'i 


"2 






1 




7 


10 
6 














541- 570 


22 






4 


3 




'i 








1 




1 




'i 


3 












1 




571- 600 


20 
49 




*i 


6 


1 






1 






1 




1 




4 


3 










2 




601- 660 




2 


19 


8 












1 




1 


"i 




8 


9 
















661- 720 


26 




7 


5 


3 


















1 




5 


4 
















721- 780 


33 




7 


5 


8 










1 


1 






1 




6 


3 












1 




781- 840 


30 




1 


16 

9 


8 








1 






1 
1 






2 


1 














841- 900 


16 




5 




















1 
















901- 960 


16 




"i 


7 


6 










1 


























1 




961-1020 


12 




6 


5 


















1 






















1021-1080 


7 






4 


2 






















1 


















1081-1140 


4 






3 


1 








































1141-1200 


2 






2 










































1201 and over 


7 




i 


5 


1 



























































































JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS (7-12) 



All Schools 


285 
1 

15 
10 
12 
11 
7 
5 
10 
13 
7 
21 
9 
31 
13 
10 
12 
14 
11 
8 
7 
7 
9 
9 
3 
4 
6 
4 
3 
2 
2 
9 


11 


14 


50 


29 


4 


8 


14 


7 


8 


7 


10 


4 


8 


7 


4 


26 


33 


4 


6 


7 
1 


3 


12 


5 


4 


50 or less 


51- 100 






2 




'2 


1 
1 
2 


1 
3 
2 
1 
1 




3 


2 


1 


2 




1 
1 




'i 


1 








1 






101- 150 






2 




151- 200 


1 
4 

'i 

"i 
1 
1 


'i 
1 

"i 
1 

*i 

'i 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

'i 


4 
2 
4 




1 


1 


1 






















201- 250 


1 








2 










1 










251- 300 
































21 .. 


301- 350 






1 
1 
1 












1 










1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 












351- 400 








1 
1 














1 


'i 


*i 


1 


1 


1 




1 
1 

i 
1 


401- 450 


2 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 

'i 

1 
3 

i 

1 
1 

i 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 

8 






"i 
2 


1 


1 






1 


'i 

1 


451- 500 


1 
1 


1 


1 
4 




501- 600 








2 
1 




1 


3 
1 
2 






i 


1 

'i 

1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
2 


2 
1 
7 
2 
5 
3 

6 


1 


601- 700 


1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 


1 


701- 800 


3 


2 
1 


2 


1 


'i 
1 
2 


1 
2 










2 
1 




801- 900 










901-1000 






















1 


1001-1100 


























1 
1 




1101-1200 






1 










1 












1201-1300 


























1301-1400 














1 
1 


























1401-1500 
















2 






1 
1 
1 
1 
















1501-1600 




























1601-1700 


































1 




1701-1800 
































2 


1801-1900 
























1 
1 










1901-2000 








































2001-2100 








































2101-2200 
























1 
1 


1 
















2201-2300 


1 






































2301-2400 








































2401-2500 












































2501 and over 


























1 





























































Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



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154 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 58 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1959-60, 1960-61, 1961-62 



Number of Certificates Issued 



Grade of Certificate 


1959-60 


1960-61 


1961-62 




4,407 


5,124 


5,735 


Administration and Supervision 








Administration and Supervision 




5 


1 


High School Supervision 


io 


10 


7 




3 


10 


o 


Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 




2 


1 




*i 


7 


8 


Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 


45 


90 


61 


Visiting Teacher 


10 


20 


13 


County Librarian 


5 


15 


12 


High School 










24 


23 


19 


Academic 


657 


781 


911 


Special 


349 


447 


547 




Ob 


OQ 
OO 


OQ 
OO 


Junior High School 


150 


158 


217 


Nonpublic 


53 


67 


69 


Elementary 








Principal 


42 


51 


30 


Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 


674 


831 


1,036 




63 


72 


116 


Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 


75 


97 


69 


Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 


14 


26 


18 


Emergency Certificates 








Degree 








Administration and Supervision 


28 


38 


33 


High School 


693 


734 


542 


Elementary School 


742 


873 


747 


Nondegree 








Administration and Supervision 


2 






High School 


40 


26 


31 




337 


345 


225 




170 


179 


798 


Substitute Teachers' Certificates 








Degree 


68 


14 


6 


Nondegree 


96 


120 




Substitute (new 1961-62) 






148 


Noncitizen Permits (new 1961-62) 






27 



156 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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158 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 





Than 

ears 

ege 


Per 
Cent 




Less' 
2Y: 
Coll 


Num- 
ber 




2-3 Years 
College 


Per 
Cent 


GH (7-1 


Num- 
ber 


Total Hi 


JO 

S £ 


Per 
Cent 


Bach, 


Num- 
ber 




ter's 
ree* 


Per 
Cent 




?§ 

SO 


Num- 
ber 




Than 

ears 

ege 


Per 

Cent 




Less' 
2 Y 
Coll 


Num- 
ber 


(1-6) 


''ears 
ege 


Per 
Cent 


s 

i 




Num- 
ber 


S 


elor's 
;ree 


Per 
Cent 


H 
O 


03 


Num- 
ber 




ter's 
ree* 


Per 
Cent 






Num- 
ber 




c 

eS 00 


Per 
Cent 




Less' 
2 Y 
Col! 


Num- 
ber 




2-3 Years 
CoUege 


Per 
Cent 


Total 


Num- 
ber 


Ghand 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 
Cent 




Num- 
ber 




ter's 
ree* 


Per 
Cent 






Num- 
ber 


Local Unit 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



159 



1 



m bC 



Less Than 
2 Years 
CoUege 


Per 
Cent 


Num- 
ber 


2-3 Years 
CoUege 


Per 
Cent 


Num- 
ber 


Bachelor's 
Degree 


Per 
Cent 1 
1 


Num- 
ber 


Master's 
Degree* 


Per 
Cent 


Num- 
ber 



MS 



1^ 



o t— •am 



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160 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 









Non- 
degree 




r Certific; 


gree Stal 


Bache- 
lor's 


a 


ipals by Type ol 


Q 


Mas- 
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176 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 79 — Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Principals Who Withdrew 
from Maryland Public Schools — By Organization; Summer, 1961 and 
School Year, 1961-62 



Local Unit 


Total 


Elementary (1 


-6) 


High (7-12) 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total State 


*3,729 


14 


6 


2,164 


16 


4 


1,757 


14 


3 


Allegany 


56 


8 


6 


31 


10 


5 


25 


7 


1 


Anne Arundel 


362 


20 





183 


18 


6 


179 


21 


7 


Baltimore City 


799 


12 


7 


431 


13 


2 


368 


12 


2 




605 


15 


6 


362 


.17 


9 


243 


13 


1 


Calvert 


28 


15 





13 


12 


1 


15 


18 


7 


Caroline 


34 


17 


1 


19 


20 


7 


15 


14 





Carroll 


70 


15 





28 


12 





42 


17 


9 


Cecil 


69 


17 


2 


37 


17 


8 


32 


16 


6 


Charles 


49 


15 


8 


24 


15 


2 


25 


16 


4 


Dorchester 


24 


9 


9 


8 


6 


9 


16 


12 


7 


Frederick 


105 


15 


9 


60 


18 





45 


13 


8 


Garrett 


25 


13 


4 


11 


11 


3 


14 


15 


7 


Harford 


116 


16 


4 


61 


16 


9 


55 


15 


9 




73 


21 


1 


44 


24 


9 


29 


17 


3 


Kent 


29 


19 


1 


12 


15 





17 


23 


6 


Montgomery 


532 


14 


5 


316 


16 


3 


216 


12 


5 


Prince George's 


624 


19 


9 


366 


23 





258 


16 


7 


24 


13 


9 


10 


11 


6 


14 


16 


1 


St. Mary's 


72 


27 


9 


45 


35 


7 


27 


20 


5 


Somerset 


22 


11 


8 


9 


9 


7 


13 


13 


8 


Talbot 


27 


14 


9 


12 


12 


9 


15 


17 





Washington 


63 


8 


3 


33 


8 


7 


30 


7 


9 


Wicomico 


62 


14 


7 


24 


10 


6 


38 


19 


3 


Worcester 


51 


21 


3 


25 


20 


8 


26 


21 


7 



* Transfers between units are included in individual unit totals but excluded from State total (192). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



TABLE 80 — Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Principals Who Withdrew 
from Maryland Public Schools: Summer, 1961 and School Year, 1961-62 



Local Unit 


Total 


Summer, 1961 


School Year, 1961-62 


NTnTTiVfcPr 


Per Cent 




Per Cent 






Tntal Sfaff 


*3,729 


14.6 


2,657 


10.4 


1,072 


4.2 


Allegany 


56 


8.6 


44 


6,8 


12 


1.8 


Anne Arundel 


362 


20.0 


267 


14.8 


95 


5.2 


Baltimore City 


799 


12.7 


532 


8.5 


267 


4.2 


Baltimore 


605 


15.6 


435 


11.2 


170 


4.4 


Calvert 


28 


15.0 


22 


11.8 


6 


3 2 


Caroline 


34 


17.1 


26 


13.1 


8 


4.0 


Carroll 


70 


15.0 


58 


12.4 


12 


2.6 


Cecil 


69 


17.2 


51 


12.7 


18 


4.5 


Charles 


49 


15.8 


34 


11.0 


15 


4.8 


Dorchester 


24 


9.9 


18 


7.4 


6 


2.5 


Frederick 


105 


15.9 


70 


10.6 


35 


5.3 


Garrett 


25 


13.4 


22 


11.8 


3 


1.6 


Harford 


116 


16.4 


90 


12.7 


26 


3.7 


Howard 


73 


21.1 


58 


16.8 


15 


4.3 


Kent 


29 


19.1 


20 


13.2 


9 


5.9 


Montgomery 


532 


14.5 


393 


10.7 


139 


3.8 




624 


19.9 


453 


14.4 


171 


5.5 




24 


13.9 


19 


11.0 


5 


2.9 


St. Mary's 


72 


27.9 


54 


20.9 


18 


7.0 


Somerset 


22 


11.8 


14 


7.5 


8 


4.3 


Talbot 


27 


14.9 


24 


13.2 


3 


1.7 


Washington 


63 


8.2 


52 


6.8 


11 


1.4 


Wicomico 


62 


14.6 


47 


11.1 


15 


3.5 


Worcester 


51 


21.2 


43 


17.9 


8 


3.3 



* Transfers between units are included in individual unit totals but excluded from State total. 



178 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Department of Education 



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180 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 83 — State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Day Schools — 
Grades 1-12: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for 
Minimum Program 


Totalt 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Current 
Expense 
Cost 


Trans- 
portation 


Amountt 


Per Cent 


Total State 


$154,825,614 


$115,359,410 


$28,947,437 


$10,518,767 


$75,521,942 


48 


78 


A 


4,599,812 


3,351,246 


847,531 


401,035 


3,028,324 


65 


83 


Anne Arundel. . . 


10,869,676 


7,933,253 


1,983,998 


952,425 


6,675,121 


61 


41 


Baltimore City. . 


36,947,248 


29,429,488 


7,357,373 


160,387 


12,933,835 


35 


00 


Baltimore 


22,126,155 


16,572,645 


4,143,161 


1,410,349 


7,128,621 


32 


22 


Calvert 


1,366,153 


885,608 


221,511 


■ 259,034 


1,108,550 


81 


14 


Caroline 


1,464,195 


980,424 


247,924 


235,847 


1,133,681 


77 


43 


Carroll 


3,095,987 


2,193,917 


558,707 


343,363 


1,766,340 


57 


05 


Cecil 


2,773,652 


1,965,395 


491,349 


316,908 


1,821,865 


65 


68 


Charles 


2,329,170 


1,586,542 


397,345 


345,283 


1,835,107 


78 


79 


Dorchester 


1,825,329 


1,233,830 


308,523 


282,976 


1,182,084 


64 


76 


Frederick 


4,122,521 


2,941,984 


736,822 


443,715 


2,341,482 


56 


80 


Garrett 


1,595,359 


989,308 


258,953 


347,098 


1,242,278 


77 


87 


Harford 


4,822,332 


3,251,175 


813,484 


757,673 


3,042,509 


63 


09 


Howard 


2,354,340 


1,632,719 


409,128 


312,493 


1,256,202 


53 


36 


Kent 


1,040,471 


712,862 


181,316 


146,293 


653,048 


62 


76 


Montgomery 


19,785,356 


15,064,883 


3,773,915 


946,558 


8,140,186 


41 


14 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


18,097,436 


13,789,522 


3,451,015 


856,899 


10,448,906 


57 


74 


1,218,247 


801,628 


202,637 


213,982 


805,854 


66 


15 


St. Mary's 


1,720,750 


1,153,187 


290,716 


276,847 


1,272,208 


73 


93 


Somerset 


1,379,499 


938,285 


234,661 


206,553 


1,140,583 


82 


68 


Talbot 


1,264,868 


876,257 


219,063 


169,548 


702,408 


55 


53 


Washington .... 


5,332,779 


3,883,725 


971,300 


477,754 


3,143,756 


58 


95 


Wicomico 


3,000,072 


2,067,375 


562,414 


370,283 


1,815,420 


60 


51 


Worcester 


1,694,207 


1,124,152 


284,591 


285,464 


903,574 


53 


33 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equilization aid includes the following: 

(a) total minimum salaries of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State 

law; 

(b) other current expense including the cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction 

other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and supervisors; and 

(c) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 

t "Tuition applicable to Bylaw 11 included in these columns only. 



Maryland State DepapwTment of Education 181 



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182 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 85 — Source of Current Expenses: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 
30, 1962 (Includes the following programs: day school, including kindergarten; handi- 
capped children; Federal funds for school lunch and special milk; junior college; adult 
education; and Teachers' Retirement and Social Security for teachers paid direct by 

State.) 













Per Cent from Each Source 










Local 




















Levy 
and 














Total 








State 








Local Unit 


Current 


State 


Federal 


Other 














Funds 






Local 








Federal 


Local 










Funds 


Equal- 








Funds 












ization 


Other 


Total 






Total State 


$256,724,372 


$97,867,589 


$11,749,629 


$147,107,154 


10.8 


27.3 


38.1 


4.6 


57.3 


Allegany 


5,961,755 


3,490,190 


213,001 


2,258,564 


29.0 


29.5 


58.5 


3.6 


37.9 


Anne Arundel 


15,923,365 


7,958,639 


1,405,574 


6,559,152 


20.1 


29.9 


50.0 


8.8 


41.2 


Baltimore City .... 


64,828,810 


18,881,685 


774,067 


45,173,058 


0.9 


28.2 


29.1 


1.2 


69.7 


Baltimore 


38,893,712 


10,573,062 


887,849 


27,432,801 


0.4 


26.8 


27.2 


2.3 


70.5 


Calvert 


1,698,312 


1,239,008 


97,691 


361,613 


43.6 


29.4 


73.0 


5.7 


21.3 


Caroline 


1,879,435 


1,279,570 


51,030 


548,835 


40.4 


27.7 


68.1 


2.7 


29.2 


Carroll 


3,956,864 


2,074,807 


88,263 


1,793,794 


22.3 


30.1 


52.4 


2.2 


45.4 


Cecil 


3,856,057 


2,126,031 


285,239 


1,444,787 


27.1 


28.0 


55.1 


7.4 


37.5 




3,093,537 


2,081,075 


348,151 


664,311 


39.4 


27.9 


67.3 


11.2 


21.5 


Dorchester 


2,241,364 


1,334,475 


32,363 


874,526 


31.0 


28.5 


59.5 


1.5 


39.0 


Frederick 


6,420,673 


2,861,066 


305,239 


3,254,368 


17.7 


26.9 


44.6 


4.7 


50.7 


Garrett 


1,806,568 


1,375,672 


47,181 


383,715 


47.7 


28.5 


76.2 


2,6 


21.2 


Harford 


7,132,094 


3,612,279 


843,907 


2,675,908 


23.4 


27.3 


50.7 


11.8 


37.5 


Howard 


3,205,291 


1,517,827 


160,439 


1,527,025 


18.2 


29.2 


47.4 


5.0 


47.6 


Kent 


1,365,007 


775,270 


41,148 


548,589 


27.2 


29.6 


56.8 


3.0 


40.2 


Montgomery 


42,940,257 


12,409,221 


626,567 


29,904,469 


4.7 


24.2 


28.9 


1.5 


69.6 


Prince George's 


30,528,048 


12,861,424 


4,748,857 


12,917,767 


14.7 


27.4 


42.1 


15.6 


42.3 


Queen Anne's 


1,615,408 


932,272 


34,358 


648,778 


30.1 


27.6 


57.7 


2.1 


40.2 


St. Mary's 


2,331,689 


1,446,111 


274,221 


611,357 


33.7 


28.3 


62.0 


11.8 


26.2 


Somerset 


1,606,255 


1,261,583 


19,080 


325,592 


48.5 


30.0 


78.5 


1.2 


20.3 


Talbot 


1,581,242 


833,949 


37,815 


709,478 


22.8 


29.9 


52.7 


2.4 


44.9 


Washington 


7,944,679 


3.761,514 


315,523 


3,867,642 


20.6 


26.7 


47.3 


4.0 


48.7 




3,719,260 


2,104,741 


63,457 


1,551,062 


26.1 


30.5 


56.6 


1.7 


41.7 


Worcester 


2,194,690 


1,076,118 


48,609 


1,069,963 


20.7 


28.3 


49.0 


2.2 


48.8 



Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



TABLE 86 — Source of Current Expenses: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 
30, 1962 (Includes the following programs: day school, including kindergarten; handi- 
capped children; Federal funds for school lunch and special milk; junior college; and 

adult education.) 













Per Cent fhom Each Source 










Local 




















Levy 














Total 






and 




State 








Local Unit 


Current 


State 


Federal 


Other 














Funds 






Local 








Federal 


Local 










Funds 


Equal- 








Funds 












ization 


Winer 


Total 






Tnfal Statp 


8241 4fi2 17Q 


$82,595 396 


$11 749 629 


$147,107,154 


11.5 


22.7 


34.2 


4.9 


60.9 


Allegany 


5,610.908 


3.139,343 


213,001 


2.258.564 


30.8 


25.1 


55.9 


3.8 


40.3 




15,117,840 


7,153.114 


1.405.574 


6.559.152 


21.2 


26.1 


47.3 


9.3 


43.4 


Baltimore City 


60,666,909 


14,719,784 


774.067 


45,173.058 


1.0 


23.3 


24.3 


1.3 


74.4 


Baltimore 


36,680,582 


8,359,932 


887.849 


27.432.801 


0.5 


22.3 


22.8 


2.4 


74.8 


Calvert 


1,600,807 


1,141,503 


97,691 


361,613 


46.2 


25.1 


71.3 


6.1 


22.6 


Caroline 


1,771,248 


1,171,383 


51,030 


548,835 


42.9 


23.2 


66.1 


2.9 


31.0 


Carroll 


3,736,148 


1,854,091 


88,263 


1,793,794 


23.6 


26.0 


49.6 


2.4 


48.0 


Cecil 


3,627,865 


1,897,839 


285,239 


1,444,787 


28.8 


23.5 


52.3 


7.9 


39.8 




2,919,690 


1,907,228 


348,151 


664,311 


41.8 


23.5 


65.3 


11.9 


22.8 


Dorchester 


2,125,886 


1,218,997 


32,363 


874,526 


32.7 


24.7 


57.4 


1.5 


41.1 


Frederick 


6,056,711 


2,497,104 


305,239 


3,254,368 


18.8 


22.4 


41.2 


5.0 


53.8 




1,706,183 


1,275,287 


47,181 


383,715 


50.5 


24.2 


74.7 


2.8 


22.5 




6,748,702 


3,228,887 


843,907 


2.675.908 


24.8 


23.0 


47.8 


12.5 


39.7 


Howard 


3,006,559 


1.319,095 


160,439 


1,527.025 


19.4 


24.5 


43.9 


5.3 


50.8 


Kent 


1,286,003 


696,266 


41,148 


548,589 


28.9 


25.2 


54.1 


3.2 


42.7 


Montgomery 


40,173,896 


9,642.860 


626,567 


29,904,469 


5.0 


19.0 


24.0 


1.6 


74.4 


Prince George's. . . . 


28,783,179 


11.116,555 


4,748,857 


12,917,767 


15.6 


23.0 


38.6 


16.5 


44.9 




1,527,882 


844,746 


34,358 


648,778 


31.8 


23.5 


55.3 


2.2 


42.5 


St. Mary's 


2,214,550 


1,328,972 


274,221 


611,357 


35.5 


24.5 


60.0 


12.4 


27.6 


Somerset 


1,513,906 


1,169,234 


19.080 


325,592 


51.4 


25.8 


77.2 


1.3 


21.5 


Talbot 


1,488,373 


741,080 


37,815 


709,478 


24.3 


25.5 


49.8 


2.5 


47.7 




7,515,140 


3,331,975 


315.523 


3,867,642 


21.8 


22.5 


44.3 


4.2 


51.5 




3,502,390 


1,887,871 


63.457 


1.551,062 


27.7 


26.2 


53.9 


1.8 


44.3 




2,070,822 


952,250 


48,609 


1,069,963 


21.9 


24.1 


46.0 


2.3 


51.7 



184 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 87 — Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1962 





Current Expenses 




Local Unit 


Adminis- 
tration 


Super- 
vision 


Salaries 
of 

Principals 

and 
Teachers 


Books, 
Materials, 
and 
Other 
Costs of 
Instruc- 
tion 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance 


Other 
School 
Services 


Fixed 
Charges 


Capital 
Outlay* 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 


2 


4 


1 


9 


64 


4 


9 


2 


8 


8 


4 


1 


7 


3 


1 


9 


22 


7 


A 


1 
1 


Q 
O 




( 


D 1 


q 


c 
O 


a 

y 


Q 
O 


5 


2 


7 


10 


6 


1 


5 


6 


3 


Anne Arundel . . 


1 


9 


2 


3 


65 


4 


8 


8 


7 


9 


2 


8 


9 


2 


1 


7 


27 


5 


Baltimore City. 


2 





2 


4 


66 


6 


8 


9 


9 


4 


4 


1 


3 


5 


3 


1 


15 


9 


Baltimore 


2 





1 


9 


64 


4 


9 


3 


9 


6 


5 


3 


6 


7 





8 


27 







2 


9 


1 


7 


60 


7 


6 


1 


6 





3 


7 


17 


9 


1 





35 


2 


Caroline 


2 


9 


1 


6 


61 


8 


6 


9 


6 


8 


3 


3 


15 


6 


1 


1 


23 


7 


Carroll 


1 


5 


2 





68 


1 


5 





5 


9 


3 


3 


12 


2 


2 





17 


5 


Cecil 


2 


3 


2 


1 


63 


8 


7 


1 


9 





3 


5 


11 


1 


1 


1 


6 


1 


Charles 


1 


7 


1 


3 


62 


7 


8 


4 


7 


6 


2 


9 


14 


7 





7 


3 


6 


Dorchester 


2 





1 


7 


62 


2 


3 


9 


8 


1 


5 


4 


15 


3 


1 


4 


13 


3 


Frederick 


1 


7 


2 





64 





10 





6 


8 


4 


3 


10 


5 





7 


26 


7 


Garrett 


2 


3 


1 


5 


61 


2 


4 


3 


5 


4 


2 


3 


21 


8 


1 


2 


9 


3 




2 





1 


7 


61 


7 


8 


8 


7 


1 


3 


5 


14 





1 


2 


15 


6 


Howard 


1 


7 


1 


7 


67 





5 


9 


5 


5 


3 


9 


13 


5 





8 


17 


1 


Kent 


3 





2 


7 


63 


8 


5 


6 


6 


5 


3 


3 


13 


9 


1 


2 


11 


9 


Montgomery . . . 


4 


2 


1 


7 


61 


4 


13 


1 


9 





3 


3 


5 


2 


2 


1 


27 


3 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


2 





1 


3 


65 


2 


8 


7 


9 


5 


4 


9 


6 


4 


2 





33 


8 


2 


4 


1 


6 


61 


9 


5 


8 


5 


9 


4 


3 


16 


7 


1 


4 


5 


4 


St. Mary's 


2 


1 


1 


5 


59 





7 


9 


7 


7 


6 





15 


2 





6 


25 


4 


Somerset 


1 


8 


1 


8 


65 


3 


4 


6 


6 


3 


3 


6 


15 


5 


1 


1 


13 


1 


Talbot 


2 


7 


1 


6 


65 


9 


5 


2 


7 


3 


2 


5 


13 


7 


1 


1 


8 


2 


Washington .... 


t2 


9 


1 


9 


61 


3 


10 


4 


8 


5 


3 


7 


9 


9 


1 


4 


1 


8 




1 


9 


1 


5 


65 


8 


6 


4 


6 


7 


3 


5 


13 


1 


1 


1 


24 


2 


Worcester 


1 


7 


1 


6 


62 





7 





6 


9 


3 


5 


16 





1 


3 


6 


7 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



otal State 


2 


5 


2 





67 


4 


9 


7 


9 


1 


4 


2 


3 




2 





23 


5 


Allegany 


2 





1 


9 


72 


7 


6 


3 


9 


2 


2 


9 


3 


4 


1 


6 


6 


8 


Anne Arundel . . 


2 





2 


5 


69 


8 


9 


4 


8 


4 


3 


1 


3 





1 


8 


28 


8 


Baltimore City . 


2 





2 


4 


66 


9 


8 


9 


9 


4 


4 


1 


3 


2 


3 


1 


16 





Baltimore 


2 


1 


2 





67 





9 


7 


10 





5 


5 


2 


9 





8 


27 


8 


Calvert 


3 


4 


2 


1 


72 


3 


7 


3 


7 


1 


4 


4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


39 


3 


Caroline 


3 


3 


1 


9 


71 


6 


8 


1 


7 


8 


3 


8 


2 


2 


1 


3 


26 


5 


Carroll 


1 


6 


2 


2 


74 


9 


5 


5 


6 


5 


3 


7 


3 


4 


2 


2 


18 


9 


Cecil 


2 


5 


2 


3 


69 


9 


7 


8 


9 


9 


3 


9 


2 


5 


1 


2 


6 


7 


Charles 


2 





1 


5 


71 


3 


9 


6 


8 


7 


3 


2 


2 


9 





8 


4 


1 




2 


3 


1 


9 


71 


9 


4 


5 


9 


4 


6 


3 


2 





1 


7 


15 







1 


8 


2 


2 


68 


9 


10 


8 


7 


3 


4 


6 


3 


6 





8 


28 


2 


Garrett 


2 


9 




8 


75 


7 


5 


4 


6 


7 


2 


9 


3 


2 


1 


4 


11 


3 


Harford 


2 


2 


1 


9 


69 


6 


9 


9 


8 





4 





3 





1 


4 


17 


3 


Howard 


1 


9 


1 


9 


75 





6 


7 


6 


1 


4 


4 


3 


1 





9 


18 


7 


Kent 


3 


4 


3 


1 


72 





6 


4 


7 


3 


3 


7 


2 


8 


1 


3 


13 


2 


Montgomery . . . 


4 


3 


1 


7 


63 


1 


13 


4 


9 


3 


3 


4 


2 


7 


2 


1 


27 


9 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's. . . 


2 


1 


1 


3 


67 


1 


9 





9 


8 


5 





3 


6 


2 


1 


34 


5 


2 


8 


1 


9 


72 


2 


6 


7 


6 


9 


5 





2 


9 


1 


6 


6 


2 


St. Mary's 


2 


4 


1 


7 


67 


6 


9 


1 


8 


8 


6 


9 


2 


8 





7 


28 







2 


1 


2 


1 


75 


7 


5 


3 


7 


3 


4 


2 


2 





1 


3 


14 


9 


Talbot 


3 


1 


1 


8 


74 


5 


5 


9 


8 


2 


2 


8 


2 


5 


1 


2 


9 


1 


Washington .... 


t3 


1 


2 


1 


65 


8 


11 


1 


9 


1 


4 





3 


3 


1 


5 


1 


9 


Wicomico 


2 


1 


1 


7 


73 


7 


7 


2 


7 


5 


3 


9 


2 


7 


1 


2 


26 


3 


Worcester 


2 





1 


8 


72 


1 


8 


1 


8 





4 


1 


2 


3 


1 


6 


7 


.7 



* Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding debt 
service. 

t Excludes Ford Foundation TV project. 

Note: Expenditures by State for Teachers' Retirement and Social Security for teachers are not included. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



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186 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 89 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — K-12: Current Expenses* — Including 
Transportation: Maryland Public Day Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


All Schools 


Adminis- 
tration t 


Fixed 
Chargest° 


Total including 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Securitytt 


Total excluding 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Securitytt 


Elementary 
(K-6)t 


High 
(7-12) 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Total State 


$403.07 




$378.41 




$319.98 




$419.41 




$9.27 




$7.33 




Allegany 


356.84 


21 


335.13 


21 


297.20 


16 


350.04 


24 


6.24 


22 


5.23 


8 


Anne Arundel 


351.95 


23 


333.69 


23 


285.79 


22 


371.83 


21 


6.55 


18 


5.73 


5 


Baltimore City 


380.72 


14 


355.60 


15 


291.50 


19 


406.97 


12 


7.16 


14 


11.44 


1 


Baltimore 


417.48 


3 


393.07 


3 


340.51 


4 


433.72 




8.21 


10 


3.02 


20 




369.43 


19 


347.95 


18 


283.36 


23 


424.06 


9 


10.01 


5 


3.64 


18 




404.10 


5 


380.55 


5 


306.98 


12 


441.07 


5 


11.00 


3 


4.39 


13 


Carroll 


354.68 


22 


334.48 


22 


257.37 


24 


402.77 


14 


5.03 


24 


6.83 


4 


Cecil 


395.63 


8 


371.94 


9 


305.70 


13 


438.10 


6 


8.68 


8 


4.12 


15 


Charles 


387.58 


12 


364.99 


12 


324.52 


8 


399.42 


16 


6.58 


17 


2.68 


23 




363.66 


20 


344.70 


20 


296.35 


17 


378.25 


19 


6.80 


16 


4.99 


10 


Frederick 


429.75 


2 


404.70 


2 


355.19 


2 


441.15 


4 


6.98 


15 


2.97 


21 




372.96 


16 


351.83 


16 


328.50 


6 


354.11 


22 


8.33 


9 


4.13 


14 


Harford 


399.92 




377.67 


7 


333.02 


5 


406.89 


13 


7.79 


12 


4.69 


11 


Howard 


379.98 


15 


355.98 


14 


320.62 


9 


381.54 


18 


6.32 


21 


2.83 


22 


Kent 


402.34 


6 


378.66 


6 


317.25 


10 


424.74 


8 


11.56 


2 


4.57 


12 


Montgomery 


504.81 


1 


471.21 


1 


396.78 


1 


502.34 


1 


20.49 


1 


10.20 


2 


Prince George's 


395.13 


9 


371.91 


11 


314.39 


11 


413.53 


11 


7.71 


13 


7.65 


3 


Queen Anne's 


415.89 


4 


392.98 


4 


343.72 


3 


423.99 


10 


9.79 


6 


5.43 


6 


St. Mary's 


391.84 


11 


371.91 


10 


304.07 


15 


442.71 


3 


8.02 


11 


2.19 


24 


Somerset 


369.55 


18 


348.13 


17 


290.53 


20 


401.65 


15 


6.35 


20 


3.94 


16 


Talbot 


369.56 


17 


347.51 


19 


288.43 


21 


398.45 


17 


9.73 


7 


3.80 


17 


Washington 


386.63 


13 


364.21 


13 


324.78 


7 


375.22 


20 


10.93 


4 


5.38 


7 




345.81 


24 


325.35 


24 


291.52 


18 


351.29 


23 


6.11 


23 


3.46 


19 


Worcester 


394.83 


10 


372.29 


8 


304.07 


14 


443.90 


2 


6.51 


19 


5.02 


9 



* Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veteran's training, and Federal funds for school lunch 
and special milk. 

t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary and high costs. 
X Half-time kindergarten pupils, where applicable, are expressed in full-time equivalents in arriving at per pupil costs. 
" State payments for Teachers' Retirement and Social Security are not included in this column. 
Notk: Excludes per pupil costs for Ford Foundation TV project in Washington County. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



TABLE 90 — Cost per Pupil Belonging — K-12: Current Expenses* — Excluding 
Transportation: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


All Schools 


Adminis- 
tration t 


Fixed 
Chargest" 


Total including 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Securitytt 


Total excluding 
Teachers' 
Retirement 
and Social 
Securitytt 


Elementary 
(K-6)t 


High 
(7-12) 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Cost 


Rank 


Total State 


$385.83 




$361.16 




$304.81 




$399.31 




$9.27 




$7.33 




All6g3>ny 


330.83 


16 


309.12 


17 


269.50 


13 


325.72 


22 


6.24 


22 


5.23 


8 


A.Dn6 ATun(l6l 


330.13 


17 


311.86 


16 


267.05 


14 


345.64 


19 


6.55 


18 


5.73 


5 


Baltimore City 


379.60 


5 


354.48 


5 


289.82 


7 


406.69 


4 


7.16 


14 


11.44 


1 




402.00 


2 


377.59 


2 


329.34 


2 


412.81 


2 


8.21 


10 


3.02 


20 


Calvert 


312.74 


22 


291.25 


22 


238.31 


23 


346.85 


18 


10.01 


5 


3.64 


18 


Caroline 


351.33 


11 


327.78 


11 


257.51 


19 


383.99 


8 


11.00 


3 


4.39 


13 


Carroll 


323.44 


19 


303.23 


19 


228.45 


24 


368.66 


12 


5.03 


24 


6.83 


4 


Cecil 


362.40 


6 


338.71 


6 


274.81 


11 


401.41 


5 


8.68 


8 


4.12 


15 




341.67 


14 


319.08 


14 


277.29 


10 


355.35 


14 


6.58 


17 


2.68 


23 


Dorchester 


316.36 


21 


297.40 


21 


252.52 


20 


326.66 


21 


6.80 


16 


4.99 


10 


Frederick 


399.96 


3 


374.91 


3 


325.94 


3 


410.72 


3 


6.98 


15 


2.97 


21 


Garrett 


304.06 


24 


282.93 


24 


259.83 


16 


284.89 


24 


8.33 


9 


4.13 


14 


Harford 


355.08 


10 


332.83 


10 


290.17 


6 


359.47 


13 


7.79 


12 


4.69 


11 




341.18 


15 


317.19 


15 


279.99 


9 


345.17 


20 


6.32 


21 


2.83 


22 


Kent 


358.35 


9 


334.66 


9 


273.17 


12 


380.87 


10 


11.56 


2 


4.57 


12 


Montgomery 


492.21 


1 


458.61 


1 


385.77 


1 


487.50 


1 


20.49 


1 


10.20 


2 


Prince George's 


384.19 


4 


360.97 


4 


307.52 


4 


397.09 


6 


7.71 


13 


7.65 


3 


Queen Anne's 


358.94 


8 


336.03 


8 


284.41 


8 


370.26 


11 


9.79 


6 


5.43 


6 


St. Mary's 


343.74 


12 


323.81 


12 


262.01 


15 


386.12 


7 


8.02 


11 


2.19 


24 




321.46 


20 


300.03 


20 


246.30 


22 


348.34 


17 


6.35 


20 


3.94 


16 


Talbot 


329.15 


18 


307.10 


18 


250.76 


21 


354.16 


15 


9.73 


7 


3.80 


17 


Washington 


360.47 


7 


338.05 


7 


298.99 


5 


348.62 


16 


10.93 


4 


5.38 




Wicomico 


310.57 


23 


290.10 


23 


259.49 


17 


311.34 


23 


6.11 


23 


3.46 


19 


Worcester 


342.00 


13 


319.46 


13 


258.16 


18 


380.92 


9 


6.51 


19 


5.02 


9 



* Excludes home teaching of handicapped children, junior colleges, adult education, veteran's training, and Federal funds for school lunch 
and special milk. 

t Expenditures for administration and fixed charges are included here but excluded from elementary and high costs. 
t Half-time kindergarten pupils, where applicable, are expressed in full-time equivalents in arriving at per pupil costs. 
° State payments for Teachers' Retirement and Social Security are not included in this column. 
Note: Excludes per pupil costs for Ford Foundation TV project in Washington County. 



188 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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191 



TABLE 94 — Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal : 
Public Schools of Maryland: 1923-1962 



Average Annual Salary per Teacher and Principal 



June 30 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


1923 


$1,243 


$1,156 


$1,671 


1928 


1,408 


1,320 


1,830 


1933 


1,453 


1,398 


1,659 


1938 


1,556 


1,487 


1,784 


1943 


1,775 


1,648 


1,994 


1953 


3,947 


3,891 


4,019 


1954 


4,093 


4,020 


4,186 


1955 


4,163 


4,104 


4,237 


1956 


4,465 


4,450 


4,482 


1957 


4,719 


4,684 


4,760 


1958 


4,944 


4,821 


5,092 


1959 


5,247 


5,079 


5,447 


1960 


5,493 


5,436 


5,556 


1961 


5,852 


5,715 


5,999 


1962 


6,099 


6,019 


6,184 



192 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 95 — Average Salary per Teacher and Principal: Maryland Public Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


All Schools 


Elementary 


High 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalst 


Total 


Teachers 


Prin- 
cipalsf 


Total State 


$6,099 


$5,970 


$9,275 


$6,019 


$5,839 


$8,996 


$6,184 


$6,103 


$10,102 


Allegany 


5,799 


5,707 


7,515 


5,767 


5,655 


7,042 


5,825 


5,748 


8,778 


Anne Arundel . . 


5,362 


5,220 


8,799 


5,301 


5,105 


8,365 


5,435 


5,351 


10,805 


Baltimore City. 


6,612 


6,488 


10,652 


6,511 


6,323 


10,550 


6,719 


6,656 


10,981 


Baltimore 


6,044 


5,910 


10,807 


5,929 


5,743 


10,525 


6,169 


6,087 


11,604 


Calvert 


5,195 


5,029 


7,416 


5,099 


4,897 


6,978 


5,312 


5,181 


8,877 


Caroline 


5,473 


5,365 


7,508 


5,653 


5,562 


7,180 


5,328 


5,210 


7,836 


Carroll 


5,497 


5,373 


8,109 


5,534 


5,330 


7,875 


5,470 


5,404 


8,860 


Cecil 


5,776 


5,638 


7,932 


5,706 


5,552 


7,458 


5,853 


5,730 


9,081 


Charles 


5,845 


5,744 


7,840 


5,899 


5,841 


7,171 


5,788 


5,643 


8,425 


Dorchester 


5,461 


5,343 


7,029 


5,511 


5,398 


6,591 


5,415 


5,295 


7,833 


Frederick 


5,811 


5,685 


8,214 


5,813 


5,640 


7,779 


5,808 


5,725 


9,829 


Garrett 


5,527 


5,445 


6,543 


5,536 


5,443 


6,420 


5,514 


5,447 


6,850 


Harford 


5,837 


5,740 


8,495 


5,849 


5,734 


8,055 


5,824 


5,747 


9,624 


Howard 


5,687 


5,524 


8,725 


5,377 


5,167 


8,288 


6,058 


5,936 


9,860 


Kent 


5,396 


5,253 


7,071 


5,347 


5,116 


6,860 


5,445 


5,373 


8,125 


Montgomery . . . 


6,594 


6,439 


11,310 


6,439 


6,212 


11,083 


6,773 


6,692 


12,123 


Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 


6,015 


5,858 


9,444 


5,959 


5,745 


9,010 


6,071 


5,968 


10,800 


5,498 


5,359 


7,200 


5,626 


5,486 


6,794 


5,377 


5,247 


8,113 


St. Mary's 


5,062 


4,952 


6,453 


4,997 


4,928 


5,592 


5,124 


4,973 


8,317 


Somerset 


5,287 


5,169 


6,551 


5,206 


5,099 


6,200 


5,366 


5,236 


7,003 


Talbot 


5,392 


5,252 


7,211 


5,325 


5,100 


6,977 


5,461 


5,391 


8,500 


Washington 

Wicomico 


5,887 


5,777 


7,656 


5,810 


5,671 


7,271 


5,963 


5,874 


8,708 


5,448 


5,332 


7,555 


5,482 


5,349 


7,123 


5,409 


5,314 


9,020 


Worcester 


5,310 


5,201 


6,850 


5,270 


5,140 


6,442 


5,350 


5,257 


8,075 



* Grades 1 through 12 only; kindergartens and community colleges are excluded. 

t Includes all principals having two or more assistants without regard to division of time between teaching and 
administration. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



TABLE 100 — Participation and Reimbursement Paid: Special Milk Program: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1956-62 





Number of 


Per Cent of 


Total Number 






Approved 


Total Schools 


of One-Half 




Year 


Schools 


in State 


Pints Milk 


Reimburse- 




Participating 


Participating 


Reimbursable 


ment 


Local Unit 


in Program 


in Program 




Paid 


1955-56 


772 


82.2 


21,833,604 


$ 820,471 


1956-57 


818 


85.6 


26,390,908 


983,689 


1957-58 


874 


89.5 


28,715,326 


1,080,048 


1958-59 


914 


92.7 


36,390,152 


1,286,797 


1959-60 


943 


94.2 


35,555,378 


1,354,115 


1960-61 


960 


93.5 


37,398,754 


1,436,752 


1961-62 


978 


93.9 


42,251,724 


1,590,134 



BY LOCAL UNIT, 1961-62 



Allegany 


32 


94 


1 


1,075,937 


43,037 


Anne Arundel 


73 


100 





4,161,268 


165,049 


Baltimore City 


187 


100 





9,561,660 


323,169 




104 


97 


2 


7,147,676 


270,555 


Calvert 


15 


93 


7 


238,549 


9,105 


Caroline 


10 


100 





193,270 


6,912 


Carroll 


23 


100 





514,117 


20,565 


Cecil 


20 


83 


3 


479,548 


15,585 




13 


86 


7 


601,509 


23,792 


Dorchester 


18 


62 


1 


234,537 


9,223 


Frederick 


34 


100 





418,952 


16,459 


Garrett 


17 


89 


5 


284,248 


10,888 




26 


100 





1,164,662 


39,223 


Howard 


19 


100 





802,835 


30,941 


Kent 


13 


100 





233,064 


7,895 


Montgomery 


106 


86 


9 


6,671,101 


264,217 


Queen Anne's 


138 


98 


5 


5,946,393 


234,848 


13 


92 


6 


187,457 


7,258 


St. Mary's 


16 


84 


2 


349,853 


12,937 


Somerset 


12 


66 


7 


113,397 


4,177 


Talbot 


11 


78 


5 


201,238 


8,049 


Washington 


44 


95 


7 


870,733 


34,719 




22 


100 





576,700 


22,903 


Worcester 


12 


70 


5 


223,020 


8,628 



198 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



TABLE 102 — Participation and Types of Lunches Served: National School 
Lunch Program: Maryland Public Schools: 1961-62 



T nr^ AT T T v I T 


Number of 
Approved 
Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of 
Total Schools 

in State 
Participating 

in Program 


Average 
Daily 
Participation 


Per Cent of 
Total Average 
Number Be- 
longing in State 
Participating 
in Program 


Total 
Number of 
Type A* 
Lunches 
Served 


Total State 


818 


78 


5 


199,908 


32 


9 


33,176,567 


Allegany 


32 


94 


1 


10,600 


65 


5 


1,749,870 


Anne Arundel . . . 


71 


97 


3 


12,241 


27 


7 


2,047,968 


Baltimore City. . 


92 


49 


1 


16,886 


10 


7 


2,826,569 


Baltimore 


98 


91 


5 


34,892 


38 


4 


5,753,758 


Calvert 


10 


62 


5 


1,298 


28 


5 


211,829 


Caroline 


9 


90 





2,257 


49 


5 


373,556 


Carroll 


23 


100 





5,703 


52 


2 


965,728 


Cecil 


20 


83 





3,899 


40 


4 


658,323 


Charles 


12 


80 





1,676 


21 


7 


272,416 


Dorchester 


18 


62 


1 


2,339 


38 


3 


375,272 


Frederick 


33 


97 


1 


9,375 


64 


5 


1,554,097 


Garrett 


12 


63 


1 


2,691 


56 


6 


450,968 




25 


96 


1 


9,328 


54 


1 


1,552,216 


Howard 


18 


94 


7 


3,911 


47 


2 


656,889 


Kent 


10 


76 


9 


1,414 


42 


3 


216,114 


Montgomery. . . . 


98 


80 


3 


28,276 


36 


2 


4,728,551 


Prince George's. . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


124 


88 


5 


30,723 


40 


9 


5,081,494 


10 


71 


4 


2,179 


57 





373,007 


St. Mary's 


13 


68 


4 


1,760 


29 


9 


276,448 


Somerset 


8 


44 


4 


1,043 


24 


1 


190,645 


Talbot 


11 


78 


5 


1,527 


36 


2 


260,691 


Washington 


43 


93 


5 


10,450 


55 


5 


1,691,412 




19 


86 


3 


3,541 


33 


4 


591,919 


Worcester 


9 


52 


9 


1,899 


34 


9 


316,827 



* Type A — 3^ pt. milk, 2 oz. protein, ^ c. vegetables and/or fruit, 1 serving bread, 2 tsps. butter or 
fortified margarine. 



200 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 103 — Capital Outlay Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of 
Education: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


Total 


Expenditures for Capital Outlay 


Elementary 


High 


Admmistration 
Buildings 


Community 
College 


Total State 


$70,933,939 


$28,975,931 


$40,863,182 


$1,012,698 


$82,128 


Allegany 


379,407 


222,159 


76,742 


1,089 


79,417 


Anne Arundel . . . 


5,730,259 


3,082,295 


2,636,789 


11,175 




Baltimore City . . 


11,505,354 


5,793,407 


5,591,939 


120,008 




Baltimore 


13,566,986 


5,632,792 


7,869,294 


63,264 


1,636 


Calvert 


870,405 


41,183 


796,576 


32,646 




Caroline 


551,187 


15,153 


536,034 






Carroll 


792,279 


536,305 


255,974 






Cecil 


237,572 


203,223 


30,925 


3",424 




Charles 


108,629 


21,468 


85,611 


475 


1,075 




325,391 


113,521 


124,037 


87,833 




Frederick 


2,206,576 


766,943 


1,438,187 


1,446 




Garrett 


175,149 


77,619 


97,530 






Harford 


1,245,880 


1,060,531 


185,349 






Howard 


619,617 


410,276 


209,341 






Kent 


173,635 


72,142 


101,493 






Montgomery. . . . 


15,119,966 


4,760,716 


9,744,012 


615.238 




Prince George's. . 


14,724,001 


5,369,815 


9,282,933 


71,253 




Queen Anne's 


86,727 


76,555 


10,172 






St. Mary's 


752,622 


64,271 


688,351 






Somerset 


229,214 


221,236 


7,710 


268 




Talbot 


132,259 


72,231 


59,318 


710 




Washington 


134,195 


88,346 


42,890 


2,959 




Wicomico 


1,117,078 


231,909 


885,169 






Worcester 


149,551 


41,835 


106,806 


■gio 






Maryland State Department of Education 



201 



TABLE 104 — Value* of Maryland Public School Property per Pupil Belonging: 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


Total 


Elementary 


High 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total 
Value 


Average 
per Pupil 


Total State 


$769,418,672 


$1,243 


$364,847,240 


$1,017 


$404,571,432 


$1,554 


Allegany 


21,591,500 


1,336 


7,571,980 


939 


14,019,520 


1,732 


Anne Arundel . . 


57,122,250 


1,295 


24,417,850 


945 


32,704,400 


1,791 


Baltimore Cityt 


155,002,543 


935 


73,791,380 


735 


81,211,163 


1,244 




127,344,924 


1,405 


58,621,551 


1,162 


68,723,373 


1,709 


Calvert 


3,668,600 


808 


2,048,100 


707 


1,620,500 


986 


Caroline 


7,032,604 


1,531 


2,677,476 


1,030 


4,355,128 


2,185 


Carroll 


11,438,134 


1,047 


4,619,563 


767 


6,818,571 


1,391 


Cecil 


16,667,100 


1,730 


6,335,000 


1,103 


10,332,100 


2,657 


Charles 


8,350,089 


1,085 


3,727,769 


830 


4,622,320 


1,441 


Dorchester 


8,195,800 


1,345 


3,350,300 


993 


4,845,500 


1,782 




20,458,430 


1,408 


9,962,180 


1,270 


10,496,250 


1,570 


Garrett 


4,732,360 


996 


2,432,200 


890 


2,300,160 


1,140 


Harford 


30,163,100 


1,751 


15,845,260 


1,629 


14,317,840 


1,909 




7,138,300 


862 


4,054,200 


859 


3,084,100 


865 


Kent 


3,322,900 


996 


1,560,687 


808 


1,762,213 


1,254 


Montgomery . . . 


115,935,498 


1,408 


66,083,234 


1,371 


49,852,264 


1,461 


Prince George's. 


97,802,024 


1,301 


43,275,955 


1,002 


54,526,069 


1,707 


Queen Anne's. . . 


3,751,775 


982 


1,632,850 


742 


2,118,925 


1,308 


St. Mary's 


6,987,900 


1,189 


2,955,150 


860 


4,032,750 


1,650 


Somerset 


4,712,768 


1,093 


1,866,625 


754 


2,846,143 


1,551 


Talbot 


6,618,528 


1,571 


3,514,116 


1,424 


3,104,412 


1,780 


Washington .... 


26,381,945 


1,377 


13,298,954 


1,282 


13,082,991 


1,491 


Wicomico 


17,258,600 


1,629 


7,846,960 


1,246 


9,411,640 


2,189 


Worcester 


7,741,000 


1,408 


3,357,900 


1,027 


4,383,100 


1,967 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 



202 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 105 



Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation! 

June 30, 1962 





School Bonded Indebtedness as op 


1961 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per Cent 






June 30, 1962 




Valuation 


Valuation 


School 


Local Unit 








Taxable at 


per Dollar 


Bonded In- 










Full Rate for 


of School 


debtedness 






County 


State 


County 


Bonded In- 


is of Assessed 




Total 


Bonds 


Loan* 


Purposes 


debtedness 


Valuation 



Total State 


$470,018,383 


$373,474,008 


$96,544,375 


$9,206,548,729 


$19 


5 


1 


Allegany 


5,218,759 


1,758,000 


3,460,759 


182,846,983 


35 


2 


9 


Anne Arundel . . . 


38,228,472 


35,519,000 


2,709,472 


473,616,078 


12 


8 


1 


Baltimore City . . 


99,367,000 


99,367,000 




2,777,461,474 


28 


3 


6 


Baltimore 


108,093,395 


81,973,000 


26,120,395 


1,746,243,155 


16 


6 


2 


Calvert 


2,764,048 


1,964,000 


800,048 


29,787,062 


11 


9 


3 


Caroline 


2,803,752 


2,230,000 


573,752 


38,477,272 


14 


7 


3 




2,348,091 


300,000 


2,048,091 


152,478,451 


65 


1 


5 


Cecil 


8,302,628 


5,920,000 


2,382,628 


106,313,225 


13 


7 


8 


Charles 


2,312,192 


776,000 


1,536,192 


58,337,924 


25 


4 







4,406,503 


3,959,300 


447,203 


73,843,400 


17 


6 





Frederick 


12,220,200 


9,135,000 


3,085,200 


203,359,787 


17 


6 





Garrett 


1,683,728 


975,000 


708,728 


41,195,591 


24 


4 


1 


Harford 


12,307,926 


11,743,000 


564,926 


202,600,008 


16 


6 


1 


Howard 


4,458,101 


1,806,000 


2,652,101 


123,855,812 


28 


3 


6 


Kent 


1,325,693 


800,000 


525,693 


43,167,550 


33 


3 


1 


Montgomery .... 


74,230,177 


50,287,708 


23,942,469 


1,380,069,580 


19 


5 


4 


Prince George's. . 


61,974,346 


45,764,000 


16,210,346 


898,480,595 


14 


6 


9 


Queen Anne's. . . 


1,582,406 


985,000 


597,406 


46,638,588 


29 


3 


4 


St. Mary's 


1,434,795 




1,434,795 


52,361,390 


36 


2 


7 




2,164,536 


1,650,000 


514,536 


27,670,560 


13 


7 


8 


Talbot 


2,316,030 


1,870,000 


446,030 


65,595,165 


28 


3 


5 


Washington 


11,243,959 


7,675,000 


3,568,959 


250,317,810 


22 


4 


5 




7,089,475 


5,957,000 


1,132,475 


139,322,011 


20 


5 


1 


Worcester 


2,142,171 


1,060,000 


1,082,171 


92,509,258 


43 


2 


3 



* General School Construction Loan. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



203 



TABLE 106 — Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest 
Payments per Pupil Belonging: June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



Total State 


$759 


14 


$20 


27 


Allegany 


322 


93 


6 


71 


Anne Arundel 


866 


71 


24 


38 


Baltimore City 


599 


76 


15 


26 




1,192 


28 


32 


51 


Calvert 


608 


98 


21 


57 


Caroline 


610 


39 


18 


77 


Carroll 


214 


97 


5 


02 


Cecil 


861 


94 


19 


14 




300 


45 


6 


68 


Dorchester 


723 


29 


20 


06 


Frederick 


840 


96 


22 


73 




Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 
Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



School 
Bonded 
Indebtedness 



Interest 
Payments 



$354 


36 


$7 


33 


714 


44 


22 


14 


538 


26 


14 


88 


397 


45 


10 


83 


901 


65 


23 


75 


824 


76 


21 


75 


414 


22 


9 


61 


244 


08 


7 


06 


502 


14 


14 


93 


549 


90 


16 


11 


587 


03 


17 


10 


669 


05 


19 


10 


389 


68 


10 


29 



* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



204 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Eeport 



TABLE 107 

Calculated School Tax Rates and Published Tax Rates: State of Maryland: 1961-62 





Calculated Public School Tax 


Rates* 




Additional 












Published 


Rates in 


Local Unit 










Tax 


Districts and 






Current 


Capital 


Debt 


Ratest 


Incorporated 




Total 


Expenses 


Outlay 


Service 




PlacesJ 



Total State 


$1 


90 


$1 


59 


$0 


05 


$0 


26 












Allegany 


1 


45 


al 


25 





02 





18 


$2 


10 


$ .08- 


-$1 


54 


Anne Arundel° 


1 


75 


al 


45 









30 


1 


95 


1.25- 


- 1 


55 


Baltimore City° 

Baltimore" 


1 


72 


1 


61 


6 


02 





09 


3 


60 








1 


98 


al 


58 





03 





37 


2 


46 








Calvert 


2 


02 


al 


22 





18 





62 


2 


25 


.75- 


- 1 


25 


Caroline 


2 


14 


1 


52 





06 





56 


2 


30 


.25- 


- 1 


15 


Carroll" 


2 


04 


1 


45 





40 





19 


1 


95 


.50- 




85 


Cecil 


1 


80 


al 


34 









46 


2 


35 


.35- 


- 1 


33 


Charles 


1 


58 


al 


38 









20 


1 


65 


.50- 




65 


Dorchester" 


1 


44 


1 


17 









27 


1 


90 


.10- 


- 1 


50 


Frederick" 


1 


86 


al 


59 









27 


1 


88 


.10- 


- 1 


65 


Garrett" 


1 


59 


1 


02 


6 


10 





47 


2 


35 


.40- 




90 


Harford" 


1 


59 


al 


32 









27 


1 


75 


1.00- 


- 1 


15 


Howard" 


1 


49 


al 


19 





06 





24 


1 


85 








Kent" 


1 


83 


al 


25 





31 





27 


2 


00 


.20- 




85 


Montgomery 


2 


29 


al 


92 





07 





30 


2 


53 


.06- 




98 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's ° 


2 


25 


al 


68 





19 





38 


2 


42 


.25- 


- 1 


50 


1 


67 


1 


35 





03 





29 


2 


00 


.20 




74 


St. Mary's 


1 


57 


al 


17 





14 





26 


1 


80 


.90- 




90 




1 


55 


1 


24 





12 





19 


1 


98 


.70- 


- 1 


45 


Talbot 


1 


63 


1 


17 





09 





37 


2 


10 


.95- 


- 1 


15 




1 


76 


al 


45 





01 





30 


1 


95 


.35- 




85 


Wicomico 


1 


78 


1 


22 





07 





49 


1 


92 


.40- 


- 1 


26 




1 


48 


1 


22 





11 





15 


1 


80 


.90- 


- 1 


40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by Local Boards of Education by total assessed valuations as used in 
calculations of State aid payments. 

t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service levies are excluded. 
t Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 
° Calendar year fiscal period. 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 as amended. 



Makylanu State Department of Education 



205 



TABLE 108 



Local Revenue Appropriations: Maryland Public Schools: 1961-62 



Local Unit 


Local 
Revenue* 


Appropriations for Public Schools! 


Per Cent of Total Revenue 
Appropriated for Public Schools 


All School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


All 
School 
Purposes 


Current 
Expenses 


Capital 
Outlay 


Debt 
Service 


Total State 


$382,341,221 


$171,821,584 


$142,640,046 


$4,419,934 


$24,761,604 


44.9 


37.3 


1.1 


6.5 


Alloganv 


7,088,243 


2,627,691 


2,265,191 


32,499 


330,001 


37.1 


31.9 


0.5 


4.7 


Anne Arundolt 


17,031,907 


8,218,954 


6,458,771 




1,760,183 


48.3 


37.9 




10.4 




148,464,234 


47,328,690 


44,029,815 




3,298,875 


31.9 


29.7 




2.2 


BaltimoreJ 


60,285,050 


33,756,759 


26,529,006 


529,105 


6,698,648 


56.0 


44.0 


0.9 


11.1 


Calvert 


1,251,721 


599,526 


360,239 


54,600 


184,687 


47.9 


28.8 


4.4 


14.7 


Caroline 


1,696.552 


814,942 


578,900 


22,165 


213,877 


48.0 


34.1 


1.3 


12.6 


CarrolU 


4,644,395 


2.823,255 


2,084,158 


433,150 


305,947 


60.8 


44.9 


9.3 


6.6 


Cecil 


3,941,543 


1,970,441 


1,463,166 


4,230 


503,045 


50.0 


37.1 


0.1 


12.8 


Charles 


2,429,829 


896,385 


781,449 




114,936 


36.9 


32.2 




4.7 


Dorchester}: 


2,719,937 


1,064,944 


866,954 




197,990 


39.1 


31.9 




7.2 


Frederick! 


6,948,256 


3,480,139 


2,909,914 


15,200 


555,025 


50.1 


41.9 


0.2 


8.0 


Garrettt 


1,986,838 


509,164 


400,598 


25,315 


83,251 


25.6 


20.1 


1.3 


4.2 


HarfordJ 


5,728,419 


3,152,848 


2,612,928 




539,920 


55.0 


45.6 




9.4 


Howardj 


3,564,278 


1,865,102 


1,492,596 


57,218 


315,288 


52.3 


41.9 


'^6 


8.8 


Kentt 


1.444,350 


742,146 


526,182 


93,149 


122,815 


51.4 


36.5 


6.4 


8.5 




53,136,033 


30,703,074 


25,689,183 


1,018,274 


3,995,617 


57.8 


48.4 


1.9 


7.5 


Prince George's 


37,392,315 


19,777,271 


14,750,502 


1,674,771 


3,351,998 


52.9 


39.4 


4.5 


9.0 




1,580,127 


828,712 


603,984 


17,356 


207,372 


52.4 


38.2 


1.1 


13.1 


St. Mary's 


2,018,213 


808,999 


601,574 


72,868 


134,557 


40.1 


29.8 


3.6 


6.7 


Somerset 


1,150,236 


424,638 


338,834 


32,729 


53,075 


36.9 


29.5 


2.8 


4.6 


Talbot 


2,402,542 


1,050,287 


756,417 


56,775 


237,095 


43.7 


31.5 


2.3 


9.9 


Washington! 


7,347,036 


4,605,425 


3,761,707 


81,407 


762,311 


62.7 


51.2 


1.1 


10.4 


Wicomico 


4,982,281 


2,427,310 


1,665,542 


99,123 


662,645 


48.7 


33.4 


2.0 


13.3 


Worcester 


3,106,886 


1,344,882 


1,112,436 


100,000 


132,446 


43.3 


35.8 


3.2 


4.3 



* Hgures from State Fiscal Research Bureau: include taxes, licenses and permits, and fines and forfeitures. 

t Figures from annual financial reports of Local Boards of Education adjusted to conform to county's fiscal period. 

t County operates on calendar year. Revenue here reported is that of 1961. 



206 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 109 



1961-62 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes: 

State of Maryland 









County Commissioners 








Total 








State 




Local Unit 


Assessable at 








Tax 






Full Rate 






Personal 


Commissionf 








Total 


Real Estate 


Property 






Total State 


$9,206,548,729 


$7,238,534,959 


$7,040,744,969 


$197,789,990 


$1,968,013,770 




Allegany 


182,846,983 


130,517,463 


125,018,793 


5,498,670 


52,329,520 




Anne Arundel*. . . 


473,616,078 


394,082,458 


387,559,573 


6,522,885 


79,533,620 




Baltimore City* . 


2,777,461,474 


2,005,763,054 


1,964,818,475 


1:40,944,579 


771,698,420 




Baltimore* 


1,746,243,155 


1,436,856,075 


1,418,524,470 


°18,331,605 


309,387,080 




Calvert 


29,787,062 


25,676,502 


24,493,730 


1,182,772 


4,110,560 




Caroline 


38,477,272 


30,562,732 


28,150,686 


2,412,046 


7,914,540 


ii 


Carroll* 


152,478,451 


116,226,351 


106,409,706 


9,816,645 


36,252,100 




Cecil 


106,313,225 


80,629,545 


74,557,860 


6,071,685 


25,683,680 


t; 


Charles 


58,337,924 


47,219,929 


44,315,409 


2,904,520 


11,117,995 


r' 


Dorchester* 


73,843,400 


54,220,360 


49,098,480 


5,121,880 


19,623,040 


i;; 


Frederick* 


203,359,787 


147,579,147 


123,138,002 


24,441,145 


55,780,640 




Garrett* 


41,195,591 


27,693,771 


24,062,035 


3,631,736 


13,501,820 




Harford* 


202,600,008 


149,904,218 


141,113,055 


8,791,163 


52,695,790 




Howard* 


123,855,812 


97,540,012 


93,797,392 


3,742,620 


26,315,800 




Kent* 


43,167,550 


34,943,970 


30,950,245 


3,993,725 


8,223,580 


i 


Montgomery .... 


1,380,069,580 


1,175,891,410 


1,162,103,550 


13,787,860 


204,178,170 




Prince George's . . 


898,480,595 


759,417,995 


750,237,455 


9,180,540 


139,062,600 


1 


Queen Anne's* . . . 


46,638,588 


39,261,988 


35,626,201 


3,635,787 


7,376,600 


V 


St. Mary's 


52,361,390 


41,195,255 


38,658,519 


2,536,736 


11,166,135 


$■ 


Somerset 


27,670,560 


21,849,930 


20,315,221 


1,534,709 


5,820,630 


1, 


Talbot 


65,595,165 


54,676,935 


50,651,000 


4,025,935 


10,918,230 




Washington*. . . . 


250,317,810 


185,379,410 


174,447,520 


10,931,890 


64,938,400 




Wicomico 


139,322,011 


103,548,561 


99,714,806 


3,833,755 


35,773,450 


1 

il. 




92,509,258 


77,897,888 


72,982,786 


4,915,102 


14,611,370 



* Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 

t Data are for the year ended December 31, 1961, adjusted as of October 1, 1962. 

i Includes assessment for tools and machinery and inventories of manufacturers as required by Baltimore 
City Ordnance number 643. Ordnance number 1340 provides that this assessment be removed over a 
four-year period beginning 1959. 

This figure includes assessments for some government property which is in litigation. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



207 



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Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



209 



TABLE 112 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Public Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 



Total Number 
Schools 



Number Having 
Parent-Teacher 
Associations 



Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester .... 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 




210 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 113— High School Equivalence: State of Maryland: 1953-1962 





Number of Applicants Who 


Total Number 


Year Endino 








of 


June 30 








Certificates 




Completed 


Earned 


Earned Certificate 


Issued 




Examination* 


Certificate 


through USAFIt 




1953 


1,005 


700 


613 


1,313 


1954 


1,377 


887 


837 


1,724 


1955 


1,495 


885 


717 


1,602 


1956 


1,476 


854 


967 


1,821 


1957 


1,603 


954 


740 


1,694 


1958 


1,802 


963 


837 


1,800 


1959 


1,681 


867 


722 


1,589 


1960 


1,850 


951 


712 


1,663 


1961 


1,940 


1,002 


833 


1,835 


1962 


2,327 


1,181 


719 


1,900 



* Includes re-tests. 

t United States Armed Forces Institute. 



9.:: 
X.:: 

ft Ml 



Maryland State Department of Education 



211 



TABLE 114 — National Defense Education Act: Cash Expenditures of Federal 
Funds l>y Local Units and State Department of Education: State of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1962 





Expenditures Under 


National Defense Education Act 


Local Unit 














Total 












Federal 


Title 


Title 


Title 


Title 




Funds 


III* 




VIII* 


X* 


Total State 


$1,246,549 


$875,274 


$247,041 


$112,238 


$11,996 


State Department of Education . . 


62,038 


37,765 


5,277 


7,000 


11,996 


Allegany 


30,146 


23,189 


6,957 






Anne Arundel 


208,933 


182,902 


26,031 






Baltimore City 


195,846 


94,633 


41,620 


59,593 




Baltimore 


130,520 


102,860 


17,510 


10,150 




Calvert 


17,360 


13,280 


4,080 




Caroline 


25,342 


17,797 


7,545 






Carroll 


25,232 


23,858 


1,374 






Cecil 


23,982 


16,481 


7,501 








5,853 


5,853 








5,844 


1,079 


4,765 








49,896 


40,341 


9,555 






Garrett 


7,910 


4,216 


3,694 






Harford 


63,131 


42,760 


11,679 


8,692 






17,987 


14,100 


3,887 






Kent 


11,798 


9,012 


2,786 






Montgomery 


133,356 


85,184 


28,554 


19,618 




Prince George's 


111,603 


81,958 


29,645 




Queen Anne's 


8,001 


4,677 


3,324 








20,216 


16,032 


4,184 






Somerset 


4,852 


4,852 






Talbot 


15,163 


12,035 


3,128 






Washington 


33,691 


13,874 


12,632 


7,185 




Wicomico 


14,906 


7,623 


7,283 






Worcester 


22,943 


18,913 


4,030 







* Title III — Science, Mathematics, and Modern Foreign Language. 
Title V — Guidance, Counseling, and Testing. 
Title VIII — Area Vocational Education — Technical. 

Title X — Improvement of Statistical Services of State Educational .Agencies. 



212 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 115 — Federal Funds Alloted and Expended in Maryland: 
Vocational Education: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


Balance, 
July 1, 1961 


1961-62 
Allotment 


1961-62 
Expenditures 


Balance, 
June 30, 1962 


Total 


$44,402 


$700,731 


$620,402 


$124,731 


Agriculture 


924 


121,679 


122,556 


47 


Trades and Industry 


♦43,103 


397,024 


316,334 


123,793 


Home Economics 




122,368 


122,344 


24 


Teacher Training and Supervision . 




17,365 


17,365 






'375 


42,295 


41,803 


867 



* Corrected opening balance includes refund of $17 from a previous year. 



ii 
r; 

TABLE 116 — Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher 
Training in Vocational Education: State of Maryland: Year Ending 

June 30, 1962 



Type of Vocational Program 



Source of Expenditures 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 












State and University Funds . . 


$45,840 


$16,978 


$14,300 


$13,970 


$592 


Federal Funds 


48,059 


18,585 


14,300 


14,582 


592 


State Administration and 












Supervision 












State Funds 


27,547 


9,643 


7,655 


9,657 


592 


Federal Funds 


29,766 


11,250 


7,655 


10,269 


592 


Teacher Training 












University of Maryland 












Funds 


18,293 


7,335 


6,645 


4,313 




Federal Funds 


18,293 


7,335 


6,645 


4,313 





Maryland State Department of Education 



213 



TABLE 117 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 
Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Type of Expenditures 




Type of Vocational 


Program 




Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Occupations 


Total 


$620,402 


$131,014 


$319,806 


$127,779 


$41,803 


Instruction in Schools 












Day Schools 


378,172 


96,829 


231,716 


49,627 




Adult Education 


78,490 


3,037 


23,792 


51,321 


340 


Cooperative and 




Continuation 


48,514 




8,770 




39,744 


Supervision 


61,287 


12,563 


35,348 


12,249 


1,127 


Instruction by the University of 


























5,880 




5,880 






Teacher Training and 








Guidance 


18,293 


7,335 


6,645 


4,313 




State Administration and 












Supervision 


29,766 


11,250 


7,655 


10,269 


592 



214 Ninety-Sixth Annual Kei'ort 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



215 



TABLE 119 — Adult Education: Receipts and Expenditures: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


Receipts for Adult Education from 
Sources Other than Local 


Expenditures for 
Education 


Adult 


Total 


Federal 


State 


Fees from 
Attendance 


Total 


Salaries 




Total State 


$302,556 


$67,359 


$37,135 


$198,062 


$790,517 


$759,876 


$30,041 


Allegany 


10,352 


6,331 


1,349 


2,672 


14,316 


12,042 


2,274 


Anne ArundeL . . . 


3,482 


314 


186 


2,982 


4,942 


4,301 


641 


Baltimore City. . . 


69,988 




10,702 


59,286 


451,523 


445,711 


5,812 




39,602 


16',53i 


4,393 


18,678 


90,595 


84,665 


5,930 


Calvert 










1,150 


1,150 




Caroline 


192 






192 


704 


646 


58 


Carroll 


1,475 


'742 


289 


444 


3,762 


3,388 


374 


Cecil 


3,040 


391 


1,119 


1,530 


1,933 


1,809 


124 


Charles 


858 


858 






858 


858 




Dorchester 


1,376 


612 


'764 




1,385 


1,385 




Frederick 


2,851 


1,524 


326 


1,001 


14,541 


12,873 


1,668 


Garrett 


474 


170 


304 




1,095 


1,095 






3,881 


1,345 


331 


2,205 


7,734 


7,734 




Howard 


408 


306 


102 




272 


272 




Kent 


571 


89 


47 


435 


1,773 


1,470 


'303 


Montgomery 


96,722 


19,813 


7,986 


68.923 


97,389 


90,557 


6,832 


Prince George's. . . 
Queen Anne's .... 


48,300 


7,547 


1,749 


39,004 


70,366 


64,263 


6,103 


1,707 


1,613 


94 




1,561 


1,561 




St. Mary's 


642 


642 






2,167 


2,167 




Somerset 


560 


560 






1,630 


1,630 




Talbot 


1,592 


852 


740 




3,741 


3,357 


384 




11,900 


6,575 


5,249 


" '76 


14,204 


14,203 


1 


Wicomico 


2,541 


544 


1,405 


592 


2,740 


2,603 


137 


Worcester 


42 






42 


136 


136 





216 



Ninety-Sixth Annuaj^ Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



217 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



210 



TABLE 122 — Vocational Adult Education Program*: By Title of Course and 
Number of Classes: State of Maryland: 1961-62 



Number of 



Title of Course Classes 



Agriculture 

Arc welding 4 

Farm machine repair 3 

Other agriculture 15 

Total 22 

Distributive Education 

Investments 4 

Other (one class in each course) : 
business law, color, color dy- 
namics, display, fashion, hu- 
man relations 6 



Total 10 

Home Economics 

Clothing 108 

Cooking 15 

Crafts 3 

Family living 9 

Flower arrangement 4 

Food supervision 1 

Furniture upholstering, repairing. . 4 

Home nursing 10 

Interior decorating 11 

Knitting 3 

Millinery 14 

Rug making 11 

Self improvement 10 

Sewing 76 

Slipcovers 4 

Tailoring 30 

Other home economics 18 

Total 331 

Trades and Industry 

Air conditioning 3 

Apprenticeship training course .... 45 

Auto mechanics 13 



Number of 



Title of Course Classes 



Trades and Industry — Continued 

Auto theory and practice 4 

Avionics drafting 2 

Barbering 2 

Blueprint reading and drafting . . 10 
Building construction and 

bricklaying 2 

Cosmetology 11 

Electricity 27 

Electronics 12 

Furniture repair and cabinet 

making 2 

Industrial safety 3 

Machine shop 10 

Mechanical drawing 2 

Plumbing 5 

Printing trades 6 

Programming 2 

Radio-television 8 

Refrigeration 4 

Related English 5 

Related mathematics 1 

Stationary engineering 2 

Tailoring 3 

Welding 15 

Woodworking 3 



Other (one class in each course): 
aerodynamics, airframe and 
power plant, baking, basic 
shop, boiler operation and 
safety, custodial training, 
food service, job instruction 
training and job relations 
training, mechanical engineer- 
ing, network theory, oil burner, 
orchestral training, practical 
nursing, quality control, sew- 
ing, shoe repairing, stress 
analysis, supervisory manage- 
ment, transitor engineering, 
trowel trades, upholstering 21 

Total 223 



*Programs administered by local boards of education. 



220 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



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222 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



223 



TABLE 126 — Enrollment by College and Class: Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges: Fall of 1961 



Class 


Grand 
Total 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburo 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Teacher Training 


Total 


3,819 


360 


357 


1,086 


418 


1,598 


Freshman .... 
Sophomore . . . 
Junior 

Fifth Year.... 


1,214 
1,027 
821 
742 
15 


97 
117 
56 
85 
5 


77 
85 
95 
91 
9 


376 
302 
233 
175 


173 
107 
75 
63 


491 
416 
362 
328 
1 


Arts and Science 


Total 


305 






132 


63 


110 


Freshman .... 
Sophomore. . . 

Junior 

Senior 


169 
105 
25 
6 






70 
49 
10 

3 


46 
16 
1 


53 
40 
14 
3 


Other Students 


Total 


152 






56 


57 


39 


Extension: 

Graduate 

Undergraduate 
Nurses 


22 
44 
86 






'14 
42 


is 

44 


22 
17 


Campus School 


Elementary. . . 


1,042 


177 


190 


230 


205 


240 



224 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



225 



TABLE 128 — Enrollment in Arts and Science: Maryland State Teachers 
Colleges by County: Fall of 1961 



Area 


Grand 
Total 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 1 Salisbury 


TOWSON 


Grand Total 


305 






132 


63 


110 


Out-of-state 


9 






5 


4 




Allegany 


116 






116 






Anne Arundel 


3 






2 




"i 


Baltimore City 


55 






1 




54 


Baltimore 


50 






1 


' "i 


48 


Calvert 














Caroline 


4 








4 




Carroll 


2 






"i 




' i 


Cecil 


1 










1 


Charles 














Dorchester 


"6 








" '5 


"i 


Frederick 


1 










1 


Garrett 


3 






' '3 






Harford 


1 






1 






Howard 














Kent 




























Prince George's 


' "i 








"i 




Queen Anne's 














St. Mary's 














Somerset 


"5 








"5 




Talbot 


4 






1 


3 




Washington 


2 






1 








29 








'29 




Worcester 


13 








11 


2 



226 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 129 

Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1953-1962 



Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


1 Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees* 


To 

State 


BOWIE 


1953 


331 


$316,737 


$59,506 


$257,231 


$957 


$180 


$777 


1954 


343 


351,712 


72,599 


279,113 


1,025 


211 


814 


1955 


338 


363,046 


75,092 


287,954 


1,074 


222 


852 


1956 


321 


388,296 


71,585 


316,711 


1,210 


223 


987 


1957 


301 


435,714 


70,800 


364,914 


1,447 


235 


1,212 


1958 


305 


454,809 


72,839 


381,970 


1,491 


239 


1,252 


1959 


330 


472,120 


91,132 


380,988 


1,431 


276 


1,155 


1960 


346 


513,573 


92,985 


420,588 


1,484 


269 


1,215 


1961 


380 


580,229 


98,844 


481,385 


1,527 


260 


1,267 


1962 


346 


630,615 


119,484 


511,131 


1,823 


346 


1,477 



COPPIN 



FROSTBURG 



SALISBURY 



1956 


295 


$199,662 


$9,148 


$190,514 


$677 


$31 


$646 


1957 


289 


238,292 


10,352 


227,940 


825 


36 


789 


1958 


317 


262,896 


11,179 


251,717 


829 


35 


794 


1959 


347 


286,047 


13,584 


272,463 


824 


39 


785 


1960 


352 


332,064 


12,529 


319,535 


943 


35 


908 


1961 


354 


410,974 


12,982 


397,992 


1,161 


37 


1,124 


1962 


353 


490,590 


22,044 


468,546 


1,390 


63 


1,327 



1953 


373 


$402,258 


$88,372 


$313,886 


$1,078 


$237 


$841 


1954 


394 


418,682 


58,716 


359,966 


1,063 


149 


914 


1955 


458 


459,180 


57,667 


401,513 


1,003 


126 


877 


1956 


564 


484,506 


65,589 


418,917 


859 


116 


743 


1957 


548 


585,568 


63,651 


521,917 


1,068 


116 


952 


1958 


533 


660,283 


75,669 


584,614 


1,239 


142 


1,097 


1959. 


659 


741,680 


114,939 


626,741 


1,125 


174 


951 


1960 


799 


865,201 


163,727 


701,474 


1,083 


205 


878 


1961 


1,002 


1,054,647 


203,947 


850,700 


1,053 


204 


849 


1962 


1,179 


1,232,485 


293,659 


938,826 


1,045 


249 


796 



1953 


234 


$349,424 


$54,129 


$295,295 


$1,493 


$231 


$1,262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


168 


1,204 


1955 


338 


386,826 


64,918 


321,908 


1,144 


192 


952 


1956 


362 


416,580 


68,945 


347,635 


1,151 


191 


960 


1957 


313 


450,320 


51,424 


398,896 


1,439 


164 


1,275 


1958 


337 


494,967 


49,515 


445,452 


1,469 


147 


1,322 


1959 


343 


510,803 


62,672 


448,131 


1,489 


183 


1,306 


1960 


381 


543,933 


85,709 


458,224 


1,428 


225 


1,203 


1961 


393 


617,078 


99,357 


517,721 


1,570 


253 


1,317 


1962 


505 


658.456 


132,327 


526,129 


1,304 


262 


1,042 



TOWSON 



1953. 
1954. 
1955. 
1956. 
1957. 
1958. 
1959. 
1960. 
1961. 
1962. 



851 
893 
1,033 
1,170 
1,233 
1,232 
1,345 
1,434 
1,563 
1,680 



$842,915 
962,662 
1,024,421 
1,120,202 
1,239,538 
1,370,552 
1,483,923 
1,605,057 
1,833,698 
1,940,347 



$121,076 
135,050 
173,733 
180,904 
196,399 
210,037 
278,001 
283,139 
310,910 
395,000 



$721,839 
827,612 
850,688 
939,298 
1,043,139 
1,160,515 
1,205,922 
1,321,918 
1,522,788 
1,545,347 



$990 
1,078 
992 
957 
1,005 
1,112 
1,103 
1,119 
1,173 
1.155 



$142 
151 
168 
154 
159 
170 
207 
197 
199 
235 



$848 
927 
824 
803 
846 
942 
896 
922 
974 
920 



* In accordance with Chapter 6 of the Laws of 1945. tuition for teacher training students at the Teachers 
Colleges was eliminated as of September. 1945. Beginning in 1961-62 board is $312 at Bowie, Frostburg, 
Salisbury, and Towson. for teacher training students planning to teach in Maryland. Junior college 
students who are residents of Maryland pay $200 additional; out-of-state students pay $450 for either 
junior college or teacher education curriculum. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



227 



TABLE 130 — Source of Expenditures*: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 
Year Ending June 30, 1962 







Total Expenditures for Current Expenses Paid by 


State 
Teachers 
College 


Grand 
Total 


State 


Students 


General 
Administration 


Instruction 


Dietary Services 


Plant Operation 
and Maintenance 










State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


State 


Students 


Total 


4,952,493 


$ 

3.989,979 


962,514 


$ 

583,155 


8.555 


$ 

2.462,049 


281.787 


% 

142.298 


$ 

506,834 


$ 

802.477 


165,338 


Bowie 


030,615 


511,131 


119,484 


80.547 




201.117 


9.162 


22.675 


78,628 


146.792 


31.694 


Coppin 


490,590 


468,546 


22,044 


66,885 


837 


311.922 


6.501 


18,755 


14,125 


70,984 


581 


Frostburg . . 


1,232,485 


937,820 


293,659 


131.907 


437 


597.939 


78.918 


23.643 


164.322 


185.337 


49,982 


Salisbury. . . 


658,456 


526,129 


132,327 


87,842 




297.984 


45.376 


17.604 


64.647 


122.699 


22.304 


Towson .... 


1.940,347 


1.545.347 


395,000 


215,974 


7.281 


993.087 


141,830 


59.621 


185.112 


276.665 


60.777 



* Current year cash disbursements and encumbrances less budget credits. 



TABLE 131 — Inventories of Maryland State Department of Education, Teachers' 
Retirement System, and State Teachers Colleges: June 30, 1962 



Department or College 


Total 


Land and 
Improvements 


Buildings 


Equipment 


Total 


$21,620,685 

170,327 

29,271 

3,722,643 
2,573,738 
5,407,508 
3,430,236 
6,286,962 


$2,542,116 


$16,235,006 


$2,843,563 

170,327 

29,271 

358,829 
310,413 
527,798 
480,785 
966,140 


State Department of Education 


Teachers' Retirement System 






State Teachers College, Bowie 


397,551 
418,444 
779,167 
251,735 
695,219 


2,966,263 
1,844,881 
4,100,543 
2,697,716 
4,625,603 



228 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



229 



TABLE 133 — Maryland Teachers' Ketirement System: Members in Active 
Service and their Contributions; Year Ending June 30, 1962 





Amount Contributed 


Members in 


County or Institution 


Year Ending 


Active Service 




July 31, 1962 


May 31, 1962 


Grand Total 


$8,298,143 


21,904 


Total Counties 


$7,170,853 


19,432 


Allegany 


223,846 


682 


Anne Arundel 


464,234 


1,299 


Baltimore 


1,425,045 


3,824 


Calvert 


62,602 


188 




69,507 


216 


Carroll 


136,173 


415 


Cecil 


147,770 


397 




110,907 


326 




71,677 


233 


Frederick 


230,427 


670 


Garrett 


65,000 


190 


Harford 


244,118 


697 


Howard 


130,824 


347 


Kent 


49,861 


149 




1,892,897 


4,414 




1,114,048 


3,046 




57,824 


190 


St. Mary's 


70,338 


224 


Somerset 


58,515 


191 


Talbot 


58,829 


183 


Washington 


270,401 


845 


Wicomico 


137,176 


450 


Worcester 


78,834 


256 


Total Schools and Departments 


$1,127,290 


2,472 


Teachers Colleges 


$146,703 


316 


Bowie 


14,216 


32 


Coppin 


17,591 


36 


Frostburg 


35,684 


80 




16,344 


39 




62,868 


129 


Departments 


$114,048 


370 


County Libraries 


69,529 


271 


Education 


40,693 


89 


Forests and Park's 


3,290 


9 


Scholarship Board 


536 


1 


Other Colleges and Schools 


$866,539 


1,786 


Barrett School for Girls 


1,450 


5 


Md. School for the Deaf 


11,656 


33 


Md. Training School for Boys 


12,773 


36 


Montrose School for Girls 


4,443 


14 


Morgan State College 


67,557 


152 


Rosewood State Training School 


6,345 


17 


St. Mary's Seminary-Junior College 


9,943 


22 


University of Maryland 


752,372 


1,507 



230 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE 134 — Vocational Rehabililation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Local Unit 


Total 
Number 
Cases 


Rehabili- 
tated 


Being 
Followed 
on Jobs 


X 1 dill lllg 

nun r»l of oH 


Being 
Prep3rG(i 
for J obs 


Surveyed : 
Under Ad- 
visement 


Closed: 
Winer 
Services 


Total State 


6,361 


1,691 


161 


784 


1,326 


1,361 


1,038 




136 


44 




25 


35 


24 


8 


Anne Arundel 


303 


85 


5 


31 


84 


70 


28 


Baltimore City .... 


2,681 


679 


63 


326 


557 


493 


563 


Baltimore 


631 


142 


29 


48 


155 


140 


117 


Calvert 


52 


16 


2 


6 


5 


16 


7 


Caroline 


56 


16 




8 


10 


9 


13 




179 


58 


3 


11 


24 


73 


10 


Cecil 


105 


29 


3 


22 


21 


17 


13 


Charles 


81 


26 


5 


5 


12 


21 


12 


Dorchester 


102 


25 


1 


16 


14 


24 


22 


Frederick 


169 


71 




4 


41 


48 


5 




45 


15 




5 


13 


9 


3 


Harford 


77 


29 




6 


19 


15 


8 


Howard 


28 


8 


' i 


3 


8 


8 




Kent 


33 


10 


2 


5 


5 


g 




Montgomery 


389 


104 


10 


82 


74 


94 


25 


Prince George's. . . . 


453 


125 


7 


47 


109 


91 


74 


Queen Anne's 


29 


11 


1 


3 


3 


6 


5 


St. Mary's 


88 


19 


2 


14 


17 


21 


15 


Somerset 


56 


16 


2 


9 


11 


9 


9 


Talbot 


66 


20 


4 


10 


7 


16 


9 


Washington 


366 


79 


10 


66 


72 


109 


30 


Wicomico 


186 


46 


10 


25 


25 


30 


50 




50 


18 


1 


7 


5 


12 


7 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Total 


Characteristic 


Rehabili- 
tated* 


Othert 


Total 


1,691 


4,670 


6,361 


Race 












White 


1,229 


3,046 


4,275 








Negro 


460 


1,617 


2,077 


342 


1,340 


1,682 


Other 


2 


7 


9 


382 


817 


1,199 










374 


976 


1,350 


Sex 








155 


500 


655 


Male 


1,060 


3,222 


4,282 


164 


421 


585 


Female 


631 


1,448 


2,079 


125 


324 


449 








91 


198 


289 


Marital Status 








40 


73 


113 


Single 


601 


2,196 


2,797 


13 


14 


27 


Married 


753 


1,636 


2,389 


5 


7 


12 


Other 


337 


838 


1,175 








Employment History 








22 


70 


92 


(at Survey) 








92 


247 


339 


Employed 


167 


194 


361 


230 


681 


911 


Unemployed 


1,524 


4,476 


6,000 


570 


1,626 


2,196 


Never worked. . . . 


272 


982 


1,254 


641 


1,623 


2,264 


Worked at some 








78 


130 


208 


time 


1,252 


3,494 


4,746 


49 


100 


149 








9 


193 


202 


Number on Welfare 














(at Survey) 


209 


529 


738 


891 


2,971 


3,862 










264 


510 


774 










168 


365 


533 










145 


299 


444 










96 


203 


299 










58 


136 


194 










69 


186 


255 











* Clients who are rehabilitated into employment during year (1,691) 
t Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (4,670). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



231 



TABLE 135 — Cost of Vocational Rchahilitatioii Case, Serivccs Rendered: 
Stale of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Type of Service 


Number of 


Average 


Total 




Clients 


Cost 


Expenditure 












Diagnosis 












9 1 "IS 
loo 


$19 


.03 


A(\ cot: oo 




VO 


47 


.20 


4, Do 1 . OO 




'111 
oil 


46 


. 60 


t A A QO QK 




1 04 


94 


.89 


l'l,DlO . Oo 


ourgery and l reatment 










Medical 


118 


40 


.34 


4,760.58 


Psychiatric 


28 


223 


.03 


6,245.00 






145 


.19 


9 7 1 /( Q a Q 
^ 1 . Oo 




on 


150 


.25 






o i 


89 


42 


7,779 . 74 


1 rosthetic Appliances 










Artificial appliances 




292 


1 9 


oy,U<s^: . 4o 


Braces ■ • • 


Q8 


60 


96 


K Q7Q Q/f 




55 


206 


35 


1 1 ,349 . 1 5 




136 


32 


29 


4,oy 1 . oo 




122 


56 


23 


6,860,11 


Wheel chairs, hand and power operated 


22 


58 


80 


1,293.54 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 










Hospitalization 


222 


331 


34 


73,557.45 


Nursing care 


13 


155 


65 


2,023.40 


Training and Training Materials 












122 


85 


61 


10,444.61 




781 


241 


17 


188,358.42 


Employment 


17 


129 


97 


2,209.52 


Correspondence 


39 


90 


45 


3,527.75 


Tutorial 


99 


73 


17 


7,244.32 




422 


32 


22 


13,596.63 


Maintenance and Transportation 










Maintenance 












465 


222 


00 


103,229.79 




19 


82 


32 


1,564.13 


Placement 


57 


39 


30 


2,240.32 




18 


34 


48 


620.59 


Transportation 












420 


53 


79 


22,592.96 


Medical or physical restoration 


118 


17 


46 


2,059.88 




94 


8 


18 


769.01 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 


132 


65 


48 


8,643.26 



232 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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234 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland Stale Deparlment of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 







Balance Forwarded from 1960-1961 

General Fund Appropriation 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Federal Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available. . 



$26,993 
951,132 
15,000 
110,459 
*(35,788) 
7,675 
31,097 
70,271 



$1,176,839 



$30,742 
523,274 

925,780 
*(22,789) 
6,545 

' 7.526 



$1,471,078 



DISBURSEMENTS 



Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communications 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 

Salaries 

Technical and Special Fees 

Communication 

Travel 

Contractual Services 

Supplies and Materials 

Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 

Grants, Subsidies, and Contributions 

Fixed Charges 

Total 



Departmental and 
Financial 
Administration 
$242,936 
20,696 
6,470 
11,587 
2,460 
18,033 
5,833 
2,195 
5,751 
143 
3,150 



$319,254 

Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 
$308,746 
27,832 
10,632 
21,019 
4,132 
22,263 
9,408 
4,641 
6,612 
3,369 
1.200 



$419,854 

Administrative 
Services 
$174,135 
21,946 
5,933 
5,358 
2,090 
5,513 
4,515 
3,771 
2,085 



$225,346 

Library 
Extension 
Services 



$83,501 



$83,501 



Administration 

$49,513 
180 

1,410 

1,536 
348 
152 

1,766 
368 
38 

2,663 
429 



$58,403 
Placement 

AND 

Guidance 
$374,936 
10,733 
12,348 
21,511 



524 
4,439 
371 
4,068 
18,652 
31,021 



$478,603 



Case 
Services 



$673,276 



$673,276 

Disability 
Determinations 
(O.A.S.I.) 
$81,425 
105,069 
2,055 
2,732 
291 
1,386 



1,556 
6,164 
5,925 



$206,603 



* Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



235 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT— (Continued) 

Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


vocatioval 
Rehabilitation 


DISBURSEMENTS 


Grants, Subsidies and Contributions 

Total Program Expenditures 

Other Expenditures 


$1,047,955 
$35,939 


Specialized 
Facilities for the 
Blind 

$9,876 

$1,426,761 


Total Disbursements 

Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury . . . 
Balance, June 30, 1962 




$1,083,894 
$71,640 
$21,305 


$1,426,761 
$7,260 
$37,057 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Loans to Students — Title II-National 
Defense Education Act: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1962 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


receipts 


Balance, July 1, 1961 


$832 


$1,013 


$6,251 


$1,402 


$16,270 


Receipts: 












State Funds 


2,061 


1,255 


1,741 


330 


1,379 


Federal Funds 


18,503 


11,238 


15,668 


4,070 


12,406 


Total Funds Available. . 


$21,396 


$13,506 


$23,660 


$5,802 


$30,055 


DISBURSEMENTS 




$13,366 


$12,300 


$20,242 


$5,377 


$26,426 


Balance, June 30, 1962 


$8,030 


$1,206 


$3,418 


$425 


$3,629 



Note: This program accounted for as "Miscellaneous Funds" by State Comptroller. 



236 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 



Source or Purpose 



Bowie 



Balance, 
July 1. 
1961 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 



COPPIN 



Balance, 
July 1, 
1961 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 



1 General Construction Loan of 1954: 

2 Equipment for residence hall 

3 Equipment for library building 

4 General Construction Loan of 1957: 

5 Construction of library building 

6 Site improvemnts, including roads 

7 Convert old library to student bldg 

8 Refurnishing external of Newall Hall 

9 Construction of laboratory school 

10 Construction of auditorium-gymnasium. . . 

11 Site improvement and utilities 

12 General Construction Loan of 1958: 

13 Acquisition of land and properties 

14 Land 

15 Equipment new library 

16 Site improvements 

17 Equipment new laboratory school 

18 Site improvement 

19 Equipment new laboratory school 

20 Site improvement 

21 Equipment new gymnasium 

22 General Construction Loan of 1959: 

23 Acquisition of land 

24 Remodeling of old labroatory school 

25 Replacement of existing boilers 

26 Construction, laboratory school 

27 Remodeling of main building 

28 Construction of dining hall 

29 Site improvement 

30 Laboratory school 

31 Construction of gymnasium 

32 Construction of library 

33 General Construction Loan of 1960: 

34 Equipment for new laboratory school 

35 Site improvement, new laboratory school. . 

36 Improvements to athletic field 

37 Equipment— dining hall and student 

activities bldg 

38 Purchase of land and improvements 

39 Remodeling old laboratory school 

40 Construction of roadway, sidewalks 

41 Construction of women's residence hall. . . 

42 Equipment for new gymnasium. 

43 Construction of roads, walks, parking areas 

44 Extend electrical distribution system 

45 Rewire adm. and old campus school bldgs. 

46 Construction of two exits — auditorium . . . 

47 Enclose stairways in women's dormitory. . 

48 Plans and specifications for infirmary 

49 Plans and specifications for add'l dining hall 

50 Survey and plans for add'l athletic field . . 

51 Road widening, sidewalks 

52 Equipment for new library 

53 Construction of laboratory school 

54 Grading of atheltic area 



$6,527 
6,524 



$*6,527 
*6,524 



169 



,342 



72,240 
44 



14,205 
47,409 
33,102 



70,349 
*44 



* 14,205 
47,409 
30,960 



S3,827 



891 



2,142 



$49,217 
663 



2,648 



543 



$16,631 

98 



963 



"543 



2,400 



5,569 
459,940 
25,000 



5,362 
425,579 
1,269 



$32,5 



565 
1,685 



2,400 



207 
34,361 
23,731 



Maryland State Department of Education 237 



Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1962 





Frostbdrg 


Salisburt 


TOWSON 




Balance, 
July 1, 
1961 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 


Balance, 
July 1. 
1961 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1961 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 


1 

2 
3 


















$l',279 




$*U79 




4 

5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 


$582 




$270 


$312 


$1,595 
9,062 




$4 
*9',062 


$1,591 


1,499 
6 




l"376 
*6 


$123 


12 
13 
14 
15 


43,994 




9,3 i 7 


34,677 


















17 
18 
19 
20 
21 


476 




"476 




"'3i 






' 31 


18',948 
11,903 




2,072 
10,240 


16,876 
1,663 


22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 


42',442 
8,480 
5,025 




36,467 
2,673 
5,025 


6,035 
5,807 


5,202 




*5',262 




102 
46.591 
38,888 




*102 
46,591 
25,939 


12,949 


33 
34 
35 
36 
37 

38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 


6,169 
5,100 
34,995 
9,648 
323,062 




2,625 
*5,100 
34,995 
*9,648 
296,904 


3,544 
26,1 58 


isi 

72,596 




*i3i 

60,845 


n',75i 


14,264 
32,489 
3.010 
3,187 
566 
3,000 
2,979 
1,111 




10,354 
*32,489 
♦3.010 
*3,187 
566 
2,648 
984 
1,111 


3,910 

352 
1,995 



238 Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



Construction Accounts at Maryland State Teachers Colleges; 



Source or Purpose 



Bowie 



Balance, 
July 1, 
1961 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 



COPPIN 



Balance, 
July 1, 
1961 



Addi- 
tional 
Available 



Dis- 
bursed 



Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 



65 



General Construction Loan of 1961: 
Rewiring main building and electrical 

distribution system 

Construction laboratory school space 

into college classrooms 

Equipment for college classrooms 

Plans and specifications for kitchen and 

dining hall 

Construction — dining hall into infirmary. . 

Equipment for infirmary 

Replacement of heat and water lines 

Frost and Alleghany halls 

Construction of incinerator 

Equipment for women's dormitory 

(120 beds) 

Acquisition of land for new library 

Preliminary plans and specfications for 

new library 

Improvement elect, system in main bldg. 

including fire alarm system 

Expansion of campus lighting 

Replacement of heat and water lines in 

main building 

Installation of new boilers 

Construction president's residence 

Construction of new infirmary and 

health center 

Site improvements and utilities 

Acquisition of additional land 

Remodeling of old laboratory school 

Laboratory school utility lines connect 

to city sewer 

Equipment for new laboratory school 

Land purchase along Warwick Ave 

Construction 2nd floor of Connor's bldg.. . 
Equipment for 2nd floor of Connor's bldg.. 
Completion of athletic area on west campus 



$50,000 



41,500 
8,200 



8,000 



17,013 
3,871 

*8,000 



32,987 



37,629 
8,200 



TOTAL SI 85,220 $107,700 $206,244 $86,676 $545,980 $155,000 $484,252 $216,728 



$35,000 
25.000 
25,000 
40,000 
5,000 
25,000 



3,168 
15,655 
14,984 



31,832 
9,345 

10,016 

40,000 
5,000 

25,000 



Includes the following amounts reverted: line 2— $6,389; 3— $3,190, $2: 7— $1 
34— $1,039; 38— $825; 40— $29; 47— $5; 45— $21 ; 46— $3,010; 47— $3,187; 59- 



,182; 9— $6; 21— $94; 23- 
-$6,860; 63— $9,500; total- 



$102; 27— $44; 31—7241; 
-$41,735. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



239 



(Continued) — Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1962 





Frostbfrg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Halance, Addi- 
July 1, 1 tional 
1961 j Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30. 
1962 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1961 


Addi- 
tional Dis- 
Available bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1961 


Balance, 
July 1, 
1962 


Addi- 
tional 
Available 


Dis- 
bursed 


Balance, 
June 30, 
1962 


55 
56 

57 

58 
59 

60 
61 
62 

63 
64 

65 
66 

< 

68 
69 

70 
71 
72 

73 
74 
75 
76 

77 
78 
79 
80 
81 

82 




$8l',i66 
11,700 

25.000 
9,500 

20,000 
69.000 

6.000 


346 
*9.500 

18.887 
20,000 

2,696 


8l',i66 
11,700 

24,654 

1,113 
49,000 

3,304 




$15,000 
15,000 

30,000 
125,000 
6,000 


845 
10,271 

1,950 
6.950 
5,959 


14,155 
4,729 

28,050 
118,050 
41 




$143,000 
7,000 
200,000 
40,000 


28,631 
7,000 

39,802 


114.369 

200.666 
198 


$479,973 


$222,300 


$454,869 $247,404 


$88,617 $191,000 


$101,219 


$178,398 


$179,822 


$390,000 


$217,387 


$352,435 



240 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 1962 



Source or Purpose 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


TOWSON 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1961-62 

General Fund Appropriation 

Special Fund Appropriation 

Appropriation Cancellations and 

Additions 

Budget Credits 

Nonbudgeted Receipts 

Net Transfers 

Total Funds Available. . . . 


$6,499 
504,689 
137,170 

*(17,621) 
3,458 
10,147 
11,627 


$7,884 
467,811 
23,543 

81 
985 
4,425 
8,101 


$4,301 
914,105 
301,390 

*(1,005) 
8,009 
65,198 
24,721 


$14,626 
522,006 
141,050 

838 
3,547 
30,453 
7,369 


$26,833 
1,527,943 
417,442 

*(21,542) 
7,860 
104,734 
17,523 


$655,969 


$512,830 


$1,316,719 


$719,889 


$2,080,793 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Administration 


















«plUO,ooO 


q> i 1 ,0 1 1 




Technical and Special Fees. . . . 


810 


1,760 


576 


507 


3,931 




2 888 


2 775 


8 577 


3 289 


11 486 


Travel 


'l32 


'457 


464 


'600 


1^579 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 










Maintenance 


444 


819 


652 


552 


243 


Contractual Services 


1,366 


2,108 


6,071 


3,541 


8,221 


Supplies and Materials 


1,991 


1,617 


2,797 


1,257 


8,259 


Equipment-Replacement 


155 


374 


207 




668 


Equipment-Additional 


3,223 


804 


1,040 




1,423 


Grants, Subsidies, and 






- 2,040 


1,255 


1,741 


300 


1,264 


Fixed Charges 


455 


252 


1,345 


691 


1,575 


Rotal 


$83,494 


$67,771 


$127,356 


$88,414 


$224,637 


Instruction 












Salaries and Wages 


$233,321 


$266,665 


$559,232 


$296,245 


$923,932 


Technical and Special Fees .... 


7,178 


9,709 


32,174 


13,038 


89,975 










100 


1,156 


Travel 


'82i 


2,049 


3,685 


1,476 


4,519 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 










3,682 




1,482 


648 


2,019 


Constructual Services 


714 


1,259 


7,372 


2,227 


11,963 




7,930 


15,191 


25,968 


9,376 


22,380 


Equipment-ReF)lacement 




330 


48 


961 


4,218 


Equipment-Additional 


16,978 


23,688 


44,283 


19,501 


61,819 


Total 


$270,624 


$318,891 


$674,244 


$343,572 


$1,121,981 














Salaries and Wages 


$43,457 


$15,098 


$69,991 


$35,815 


$110,909 


Technical and Special Fees. . . . 


1,000 


797 


4,528 


1,200 


2,406 


Food 


57,201 


13,511 


113,443 


41,510 


128,241 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 








94 












Constructual Services 


1,792 


1,393 




2,661 


3,335 


Supplies and Materials 


2,016 


1,550 




i,ot)y 


4,483 




231 


636 




1,384 


1,214 


Equipment-Additional 


646 




4i8 














Total 


$106,343 


$32,985 


$192,404 


$84,429 


$250,682 


Plant Operation and 












Maintenance 












Salaries and Wages 


$109,488 


$45,247 


$150,443 


$82,669 


$215,889 


Technical and Special Fees. . . . 


600 


333 


456 




1,483 


Fuel 


26,822 


5,534 


10,202 


14',25i 


27,889 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 








1,977 




2,560 


137 


1,131 


1,187 




28,629 


21,116 


51,976 


38,140 


54,191 


Supplies and Materials 


5,616 


4,022 


13,341 


8,284 


26,644 


Equipment-Replacement 


146 


'290 


851 


1,189 


2,867 




60 


2,063 


2,406 


2,732 


Total 


$173,921 


$76,679 


$230,463 


$148,126 


$333,672 


Total Program Expenditures .... 


$634,382 


$496,326 


$1,224,467 


$664,541 


$1,930,972 


Refunds 


413 




3,831 


2,105 


8,360 


Activities Association 


5,510 


3,960 


30,289 


7,045 


26,662 




3,674 




24,300 


9,722 


25,612 








2,090 


26,525 


Other Expenditures 






'345 


216 


574 


Clearing Account for Payrolls . . . 




'375 


3,900 


4,632 


15,201 


Total Disbursements 


$643,979 


500,661 


$1,287,132 


$690,351 


$2,033,906 


Unexpended Balance Re- 






$9,268 




$1,021 


turned to Treasury 


$6,452 


$9,144 


$14,831 


Balance, June 30, 1962 


$5,538 


$3,025 


$20,319 


$14,707 


$45,866 



* Denotes red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



241 



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259 









<u 




O 


Teaching 
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capped 
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264 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE XVIII — Disbursements for Debt Service: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1962 







School Construction Debt Service 






Long-term County Bonds 


State 


Loan 


T,r»pQl TTnit" 














Service 


















Redemption 


Interest 




^OO QQ1 QAA 


$13,904,241 


$10,291,675 


$7,529,998 


$2,255,986 


Allegany 


602,530 


161,000 


44,359 


333,048 


64,123 


Anne Arundel 


2,782,156 


1,299,000 


1,020,564 


407,894 


54,698 


Baltimore City 


4,855,673 


2,328,000 


2,527,673 






Baltimore 


8,066,465 


3,246,000 


2,386,654 


1,873,320 


560,491 


Calvert 


285,130 


*111,000 


*81,187 


76,244 


16,699 


Caroline 


299,517 


130,000 


71,353 


83,309 


14,855 


Carroll 


350,182 


100,000 


6,000 


195,295 


48,887 


Cecil 


688,721 


300,000 


115,575 


204,374 


68,772 


Charles 


252,516 


49,000 


8,852 


152,104 


42,560 


Dorchester 


307,681 


116,000 


112,564 


69,478 


9,639 


Frederick 


802,928 


205,000 


248,750 


267,691 


81,487 


Garrett 


195,558 


100,000 


24,562 


60,709 


10,287 




879,764 


396,000 


370,235 


102,290 


11,239 


Howard 


438,767 


157,000 


53,472 


158,538 


69,757 


Kent 


143,270 


50,000 


21,525 


57,144 


14,601 




5,406,129 


1,799,241 


1,358,192 


1,652,030 


596,666 


Prince George's 


4,865,695 


2,377,000 


1,266,111 


854,279 


368,305 


Queen Anne's 


147,433 


50,000 


24,701 


60,721 


12,011 


St. Mary's 


181,924 






140,444 


41,480 


Somerset 


153,456 




53,075 


89,076 


11,305 


Talbot 


299,942 


145,000 


59,725 


87,094 


8,123 


Washington 


1,046,572 


400,000 


233,568 


318,954 


94,050 


Wicomico 


669,508 


285,000 


176,740 


182,123 


25,645 




260,383 


100,000 


26,238 


103,839 


30,306 



* Includes $15,000 principal and $6,113 interest on long-term current expense loan. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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Total Senior High School Enrollment by Course 


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254 
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123 
103 
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9,204 
1,077 
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367 
996 
853 
919 
843 
678 
633 
753 
763 
184 
177 








Num- 
ber of 
Teach- 
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Local Unit 
Name of High School 


Total State 

Allegany 

Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

Allegany Sr.-Jr 

Valley Sr.-Jr 

Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr 

Cresaptown Jr 

Penn. Ave. Eloni.-Jr.. . 
Beall Elem.-Jr 

Anne Arundel 

Glen Burnie Sr 

Arundel Sr 

Annapolis Sr 

Southern Sr.-Jr 

Severna Park Sr.-Jr. . . 
Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr.. 

Andover Sr.-Jr 

Bates Sr.-Jr 

Marley Jr 

Annapolis Jr 

Annapolis Jr. Annex . . 
Bates Jr. Annex 



Maryland State Department of Education 269 





670 529 

602 ... 537 ... 522 

588 593 441 341 161 725 

100 128 415 400 56 26i 

619 3,455 4,126 1,557 369 3,215 178 27 

479 515 205 106 ^^8 187 

315 261 315 74 53 330 

128 141 149 85 16 115 40 ... 

A(\1 COO OOO OOC OO 1 AC 

491 533 328 235 22 105 

383 324 490 212 22 354 37 

352 300 638 191 45 510 

253 172 326 92 9 295 

358 284 673 242 35 505 lOl 21 

66 66 133 21 16 118 

191 199 122 40 16 87 

32 29 74 57 9 79 

155 118 326 72 13 287 


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150 177 

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689 ... 2, 

762 

205 201 
117 434 

247 

737 ... 2, 

... 222 341 

... 209 120 
137 116 
115 160 

32 

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308 352 
... 221 274 

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) 7 296 281 
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Eastern 

Patterson Park 

Forest Park 

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Dougla.ss 

Mergenthaler 

Carver 

Dunbar 

Junior High Schools. . 
Gen. Voc. Schools.... 

Baltimore 

Milford Mill Sr 

Woodlawn Sr 

Towson Sr 

Parkvillc Sr 

Dundalk Sr 

(Jverlea Sr 

Hereford Sr.-Jr 

PidgelyJr.-Dulaney Sr. 
Soliers Point Sr.-Jr... . 
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Catonsville Jr 

Sudbrook Jr 

Franklin Jr 

l/och Haven Jr 

Towsontown Jr 

Holabird .Jr 

North Point Jr 

f lolden Ring Jr 

Parkville Jr 

Middle River Jr. ,, 



270 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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Cecil 

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Bohemia Manor Sr.-Jr. 
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North East Sr.-Jr 

Perryville Sr.-Jr 

Elkton Jr 


La Plata Sr.-Jr 

Bel Alton Sr-.Jr 

Pomonkey Sr.-Jr 

Xanjemoy Jr 

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Hughesville Jr 


DoKCHESTER 

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Mace's Lane Sr.-Jr.. . . 

Cambridge Jr. 

Hurlock Elem.-Jr 


Frederick 

Lincoln Sr 

Frederick Sr 

Middletown Sr.-Jr.. . . 

Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 

Linganore Sr-Jr 

Thurmont Sr.-Jr 

Brunswick Sr.-Jr 

Walkersville Sr.-Jr.... 

Kim Street Jr 

West Frederick Jr 


id 

p 


Southern Carrett Co. 

Sr.-Jr 

Route 40 Jr 

Kitzmiller Jr 



272 



Ninety- Sixth Annual Report 



-111 



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7 272 

3 418 

4 61 

3 239 

4 314 

4 402 

197 

6 59 
2 62 
2 67 

1 72 

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625 
878 
360 
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1,116 
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317 
259 
385 

510 

610 
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274 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



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29.0 
22.0 
18.5 

131.0 
25.1 
20.0 
22.0 
27.4 




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Local Unit 
Name of High School 


Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 

Kennard Sr.-Jr 

Stevensvi lie Sr.-Jr 

St. Mart's 

Leonardtown Sr.-Jr. . . 

Banneker Sr.-Jr 

Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr. 
Great Mills Sr.-Jr 


Ueorge WasninRton 

Carver Sr.-Jr 

Esperanza Jr 


Washington Sr.-Jr. . . . 
Marion Sr.-Jr 

Crisfield Sr.-Jr 

Deal Island Sr.-Jr 

Somerset Sr.-Jr 

Ewell Jr 


Easton Sr.-Jr 

Moton Sr.-Jr 

St. Michaels Sr.-Jr. . . . 



Maryland State Department of Education 



275 





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Washington 

South HagerstownSr.. 

lioonsboro Sr 

North HagerstownSr.. 
WillianisportiSr,-Jr.. . . 
Clear Spring Sr.-Jr — 

Hancock Sr.-Jr 

Srnithsburg Sr.-Jr 

Hancock Int.-Jr 

Hoonsboro Jr 

South Potomac Jr, , 
North Potomac Jr 

Wicomico 

Wicomico Sr 

Mardela Sr.-Jr 

I'ittsville Sr.-Jr 

Wicomico Jr 

Salisbury High 

Worcester 

Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 

Stephen Decatur 

Sr.-Jr 

\\ orce.ster Sr.-Jr 



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276 



Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 
TABLE XXIII — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates; 



Local Unit 


Total 




Social 




Mathe- 








Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Name of High School 


ment 













Total Counties 

1 Allegany 

2 Oldtown Sr.-Jr 

3 Flintstone Sr.-Jr 

4 Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

5 Allegany Sr.-Jr 

6 Bruce Sr.-Jr 

7 Valley Sr.-Jr 

8 Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr 

9 Beall Sr.-Jr 

10 Cresaptown Jr 

11 Penn Aye. Elem.-Jr. . . . 

12 Beall Elem.-Jr 

13 Anne Arundel 

14 Glen Burnie Sr 

15 Arundel Sr 

16 Annapolis Sr 

17 Southern Sr.-Jr 

18 Seyerna Park Sr.-Jr. .. . 

19 Brooklyn Sr.-Jr 

20 Andover Sr.-Jr 

21 Bates Sr.-Jr 

22 George Fox Jr 

23 Marley Sr 

24 Arundel Jr 

25 Annapolis Jr 

26 Annapolis Jr. Annex. . . 

27 Bates Jr. Annex 

28 Baltimore 

29 Catonsville Sr 

30 Milford Mill Sr 

31 Woodlawn Sr 

32 Franklin Sr 

33 Towson Sr 

34 Parkyille Sr 

35 Dundalk Sr 

36 Overlea Sr 

37 Kenwood Sr 

38 Hereford Sr.-Jr 

39 Ridgely Jr.-Dulaney Sr, 

40 Sollers Point Sr.-Jr. . . . 

41 Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr.. 

42 Catonsville Jr 

43 Johnnycake Jr 

44 Sudbrook Jr 

45 Franklin Jr 

46 Dumbarton Jr 

47 Loch Raven Jr 

48 Towsontown Jr 

49 Dundalk Jr 

50 Holabird Jr 

51 North Point Jr 

52 Arbutus Jr 

53 Golden Ring Jr 

54 Parkville Jr 

55 Stemmers Run Jr 

56 Middle River Jr 

57 Calvert 

58 Calvert County Sr.-Jr. . 

59 W. S. Brooks Sr.-Jr.... 

60 Beach Jr 

61 Mt. Harmony Jr 

62 Caroline 

63 North Caroline Sr 

64 Lockerman Sr. Jr 

65 Preston Sr.-Jr 

66 Federalsburg Sr.-Jr 

67 Greensboro Jr 

68 Denton Jr 

69 Ridgely Jr 



197 184 


247 027 


198 265 


169 521 


159 348 


8 886 


32 544 


8 175 


11,398 


8,057 


8,872 


6,176 


840 


513 


215 


289 


'213 


218 


' 138 






220 


292 


241 


194 


140 




21 


2 039 


2 883 


2 081 


1 904 


1 544 


231 




2 031 


2^784 


1^852 


1*665 


1 ' 544 


276 


88 


801 


1 ' 107 


855 


657 


564 


90 


121 


781 


1 007 


716 


553 


557 


105 


67 


540 


692 


559 


398 


396 




155 


954 


1,203 


946 


754 


699 


i38 


61 


234 


390 


234 


2,169 


234 






209 


449 


209 


209 


209 






151 


302 


151 


151 


151 






18 587 


23,950 


19 497 


16 122 


15 303 
966 


425 


2 556 


2 148 


2 291 


2125 


1 370 


201 


365 


' 788 


835 


'887 


637 


441 




144 


1 160 


1 252 


1 416 


842 


683 


57 


323 


'727 


926 


'756 


643 


534 




152 


1 984 


2 351 


2, 155 


1,762 


1,672 


49 


337 


1 ' 790 


2, 180 


2^014 


1^530 


1^415 


61 


201 


1 820 


2 263 


1 ' 859 


1 323 


1630 


57 


272 


1 619 


1 ' 736 


1736 


1*467 


1*417 




200 


1 447 


2*421 


1 '447 


1 446 


1*443 




73 


1 '283 


1 756 


1 ^283 


1 ', 283 


1*283 




141 


1 569 


2 680 


1567 


1 567 


1*567 




176 


1 547 


1849 


1547 


1 '547 


1*547 




172 


'357 


714 


'357 


'357 


'357 






348 


696 


348 


348 


348 






40 697 


58 425 


42,444 


35 175 


33 322 


1 507 


5 718 


1 754 


2 004 


2 060 


1168 


'975 


* 160 


258 


1 500 


1636 


1 ' 803 


'997 


1 149 


111 


562 


1 348 


1 482 

806 


1 481 


1 091 


624 


69 


228 


' 674 


* 720 


423 


344 


58 


153 


1 714. 


2 039 


1 915 


1 148 


1 210 


145 


498 


1 822 


1992 


2*094 


1*272 


1054 


145 


343 


2 036 


2314 


2*332 


1*295 


1*108 


118 


303 


1 147 


1 245 


1229 


914 


566 


90 


155 


2^225 


2!536 


21558 


1,442 


1,147 


121 


286 


1,144 


1,703 


1,153 


1,019 


910 




231 


1,0/0 


2 382 


1 715 


1 477 


1 467 


141 


328 


008 


1 410 


826 


813 


714 




60 


Z , Uoo 


2 969 


2 100 


1 749 


1 528 


29 


267 


1 315 


2*217 


1 286 


1*286 


1*286 


40 


169 


1^720 


2; 809 


l!710 


l!713 


1^707 


62 


164 


1,607 


2,585 


1,604 


1,594 


1,596 


42 


242 


1 , 198 


1 Q7Q 


1 164 


1 164 


1 140 




126 


1 n 1 ^ 


1 681 


1 046 


1 046 


1047 


45 


185 


1 ,040 


1 , 631 


1 nm 

968 


942 


1 094 


10 


108 


969 


1 KQK 


983 


'937 


89 


158 


1 ,214 


flflO 




1 200 


1 200 




88 


1 ,372 


Z , ZOi 


1,00 1 


1 357 


1*357 




99 


1 , 280 


z , uyu 


1 259 


1 ' 261 


1 261 




73 


1,549 


2,621 


1,'559 


1^549 


l!549 


■32 


90 


1 479 


2 365 


1 436 


1 , 432 


1 496 




132 


l!274 


2! 054 


l!261 


l!261 


l!261 




186 


1,933 


3,152 


1,896 


1,897 


1,913 




109 


1,714 


2,876 


1,682 


1,682 


1,682 




117 


1,680 


2,436 


1,733 


1,474 


1,313 


21 


422 


742 


958 


761 


644 


563 


21 


299 


670 


930 


705 


565 


482 




70 


134 


280 


134 


134 


134 




53 


134 


268 


133 


131 


134 






1,914 


2,653 


1,999 


1,600 


1,295 


174 


130 


611 


739 


670 


501 


291 


116 


52 


424 


489 


424 


358 


330 




78 


182 


239 


199 


135 


120 


'23 




351 


496 


362 


260 


208 


35 




131 


262 


131 


131 


131 






162 


322 


160 


162 


162 






53 


106 


53 


53 


53 







Maryland State Department of Education 277 



Each Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1961 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




1 

i Art— 






Foreign 


Agri- 






Home 


Business 






1 Arts 


Driver 






culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Music 
* 




l^iHiipatinn 






Arts 


\ ocationa 


nomics 




Education 




Crafts 




10,366 


716 


3,578 


61,070 


4,310 


53,381 


66,821 


172,538 


111,406 


72,273 


7,312 


289 




28 


2,111 


294 


2,187 


3,047 


5,919 


6,266 


3,404 


471 








68 




73 


104 


188 


212 


76 








28 


41 




83 


75 


240 


229 






95 






544 


i95 


508 


606 


1,174 


1,018 


563 


ieo 


194 






441 


18 


446 


718 


1,402 


1,788 


857 


88 








266 


40 


306 


355 


556 


739 


388 


62 








225 




204 


482 


542 


546 


482 


60 








183 




153 


191 


401 


438 


341 


42 








232 


"4i 


291 


516 


494 


492 


337 


59 








111 




123 




234 


295 




















507 


356 


209 


















181 


153 


151 




418 


84 


32 


5 712 


545 


5,011 


6,248 


14,674 


9,463 


7,883 
286 










'443 


497 


384 


2,375 


945 


543 




'68 






158 




78 


600 


687 


134 


75 




109 






319 




116 


797 


601 


334 


130 








32 


237 




251 


303 


446 


399 


224 




102 






479 




527 


600 


1,426 


923 


927 






a 42 




701 




523 


826 


1 ,246 


774 


718 






a 42 




589 




560 


399 


1,511 


880 


919 




139 






558 


'48 


619 


348 


1,103 


1,159 
966 


341 










519 




461 




1,447 


933 










439 




420 




1,609 


795 


823 










653 




501 




1,570 


1,084 


1,037 
869 










617 




571 




1 ,482 


871 


















357 


357 


357 


















244 


244 


244 




3, 127 


^0 


71 


13,689 


324 


1 1 , 043 


12,168 


40,615 


29,285 


24,179 


1,430 


277 






633 




458 


1 , 683 


1 ,697 


398 


181 


240 


243 






322 




298 


777 


1,471 


327 


152 


54 


166 






590 




376 


1,393 


1,281 


240 


127 


53 


77 






233 


'46 


100 


501 


646 


224 


66 


73 


324 


b 44 




245 


21 


277 


891 


1,666 


292 


184 


125 


267 






484 


38 


329 


1,157 


1,784 


509 


122 


124 


195 






640 


74 


341 


1,654 


1,966 


327 


279 


240 


196 






461 




154 


797 


1,131 


179 


77 


50 


221 






718 


ii5 


357 


1,580 


2,091 
1,107 


316 


174 


104 






71 


353 




249 


410 


874 


668 


102 


149 


^ 26 




512 




495 


355 


1,685 


1,095 


962 


100 








292 


'ii 


254 


180 


860 


768 


607 


45 


• ■ • 






746 


25 


461 


790 


2,054 


1,503 


1,231 


120 


117 






485 




424 




1,315 


1,478 


1,165 




83 






638 




538 




1,729 


1,690 


1,596 




84 






556 




562 




1,602 


1,574 


1,316 




32 






396 




392 




1,546 


1,263 


1,280 




48 






348 




373 




1,047 


973 


906 




68 






392 




363 




1,051 


1,126 


998 




24 






o-iO 




307 




999 


1, 141 


978 




50 






446 




402 




1,214 


1,492 


1,076 










465 




439 




1,380 


1,498 


1,353 










442 




432 




1,271 


1,489 


1,280 




134 






558 




530 




1,520 


1,717 


1,507 




155 






526 




514 




1,511 


1,570 


1,371 




114 






446 




441 




1,291 


1,205 


1,113 




103 






818 




635 




1,986 


2,090 


1,738 










598 




542 




1,714 


1,927 


1,672 








102 


343 




453 


648 


1,304 


1,008 


271 










256 




200 


436 


517 


416 


17 








102 


87 




253 


212 


519 


308 


120 


















134 


150 




















134 


134 


i34 




48 




209 


706 




564 


1,079 


1,644 


1,386 


740 


107 






72 


302 




111 


536 


456 


267 


184 


90 






76 


151 




194 


209 


350 


558 










30 


35 




62 


112 


172 


123 


isi 




48 




31 


74 




62 


222 


322 


68 


122 


'17 








68 




63 




131 


146 


131 










58 




37 




160 


150 


119 










18 




35 




53 


74 


53 





278 Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



T TT 

Local Unit 


1 otal 




OOCldl 




Mathe- 








H/nrou- 


i^ngiisn 


Studies 


ccience 


matics 


T 4- 

Latm 


1 

rrencu 


XT r u o u I 

JName oi Hign ocnool 


ment 












70 Carroll 


4,942 


5,707 


5,067 


4,432 


4,120 


96 


549 


71 Francis Scott Key Sr 


399 


445 


383 


318 


250 




89 


72 WGstrninstcr Sr 


1 128 


1,321 


1,168 


927 


796 


96 


190 


73 North Carrol! Sr 


'510 


'713 


'589 


400 


286 




72 


74 Mount Airy Sr 


290 


375 


282 


257 


212 




51 




416 


417 


417 


375 


355 




64 




549 


776 


593 


509 


610 




75 


77 Robert Moton Sr.-Jr 


197 


198 


197 


178 


146 




8 


78 Charles Carroll Jr 


82 


82 


82 


87 


82 








181 


181 


181- 


179 


181 








596 


608 


574 


608 


608 






8 1 Hainpstead Jr 


129 


129 


129 


129 


129 








129 


129 


139 


129 


129 






83 Elmer A. Wolfe Jr 


111 


108 


108 


111 


111 






84 Mount Airy Jr „ . . 


225 


225 


225 


225 


225 








3,969 


4,136 


4,101 


3,326 


3,051 


143 


281 


86 Elkton Sr 


453 


481 


518 


293 


179 


20 


118 


87 Bohemia Manor Sr.-Jr 


495 


495 


535 


441 


358 




44 


88 G. W. Carver Sr.-Jr 


151 


151 


161 


112 


168 






89 North East Sr.-Jr 


742 


745 


734 


640 


544 


60 




90 Risinc Sun Sr -Jr 


747 


947 


802 


648 


585 






91 Perryville Sr.-Jr 


599 


566 


616 


458 


491 


'63 


■54 


92 Elkton Jr 


782 


751 


735 


734 


726 




65 


93 Charles 


3,276 


3,055 


3,376 


2,772 


2,536 


191 


228 


94 La Plata Sr.-Jr 


889 


900 


933 


728 


621 


84 


45 


95 Bel Aton Sr.-Jr 


447 


436 


431 


383 


380 




37 




728 


480 


625 


540 


509 




105 


97 Lackey Sr.-Jr 


787 


814 


962 


696 


604 


io7 


41 


98 Nanjemoy Jr 


78 


78 


78 


78 


78 






99 Glasva Jr 


83 


83 


83 


83 


83 








100 


100 


100 


100 


100 






101 Malcolm Jr 


164 


164 


164 


164 


161 






102 Dorchester 


2,766 


3,076 


2,880 


2,393 


2,146 


173 


363 


103 Cambridge Sr 


709 


595 


817 


554 


436 


89 


184 




544 


583 


595 


448 


375 


65 


69 




196 


210 


202 


162 


141 


19 




106 Mace's Lane Sr.-Jr 


746 


956 


695 


675 


624 




iio 


107 St. Clair Jr 


79 


158 


79 


79 


79 






108 Cambridge Jr 


418 


500 


418 


401 


417 






109 Vienna Elem.-Jr 


21 


21 


21 


21 


21 






1in Hiirlnf>lf Elpm-Tr 


53 


53 


53 


53 


53 






111 Frederick 


6,807 


7,346 


6,545 


5,607 


5,032 


372 


725 


112 Lincoln Sr 


98 


98 


98 


16 


36 






113 Frederick Sr 


1,293 


1,502 


1.216 


975 


496 


i62 


239 


114 Middletown Sr.-Jr 


750 


773 


740 


700 


559 


51 






230 


229 


229 


218 


193 




36 




521 


538 


513 


481 


382 


"9 


32 


117 Thurraont Sr.-Jr 


711 


754 


606 


580 


546 




60 


118 Brunswick Sr.-Jr 


570 


593 


566 


483 


368 




82 


119 Walkersville Sr.-Jr 


643 


673 


619 


486 


494 




139 


120 Elm Street Jr 


537 


537 


520 


406 


520 


59 


55 


121 West Frederick Jr 


1,454 


1,649 


1,438 


1,262 


1,438 


91 


82 


122 Garrett 


2,043 


2,127 
806 


1,965 


1,600 


1,707 




201 


123 Northern Garrett Co. Sr.-Jr. 


783 


783 


664 


648 




59 


124 Southern Garrett Co. Sr.-Jr. 


1,128 


1,152 


1,013 


804 


918 




142 


125 Route 40 Jr 


58 


58 


58 


58 


67 






126 Kitzmiller Jr 


74 


111 


111 


74 


74 






127 Harford 


7,628 


8,469 


7,491 


6,751 


6,243 


543 


1,226 


128 Bel Air Sr 


1,443 


1,588 


1,348 


1,135 


1,019 


183 


351 


129 Edgewood Sr.-Jr 


1,083 


1,119 


1,097 


1,002 


889 


75 


49 


130 Havre de Grace Consol.Sr-Jr. 


321 


415 


320 


283 


259 




48 


131 Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 


1,499 


1,615 


1,503 


1,432 


1,225 


i37 


498 
46 


132 Central Consolidated Sr.-Jr. 


417 


545 


375 


414 


375 


'67 


133 North Harford Sr.-Jr 


1,071 


1,283 


1,069 


823 


887 


74 


134 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 


930 


974 


934 


826 


756 


81 


160 


135 Bel Air Jr 


864 


930 


845 


836 


833 







Maryland State Department of Education 279 



Kach Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1961 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 


Spanish 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Music 


and 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


V ocational 


nomics 




Education 




Crafts 








loo 


1,847 


38 


1 914 


2 268 


4 569 


4 821 


784 








on 
yu 


116 




207 


320 


337 


342 












481 


'38 


295 


702 


800 


639 


i69 








'67 


109 




165 


509 


447 


505 












61 




93 


188 


242 


300 












185 




172 


194 


405 


476 












188 




142 


252 


550 


396 


96 










70 




70 


103 


209 


279 


37 










44 




38 




82 


89 












93 




88 




181 


212 












303 




299 




622 


859 


319 










72 




57 




129 


153 












10 




64 




129 


174 


'55 














114 




211 


135 


108 










iio 




110 




225 


262 






1 en 
ley 




1 1 7 
1 1 < 


1,182 


18 


1 164 


1 795 


3 462 


1 804 


674 


157 








90 


18 


94 


533 


254 


243 


42 








42 


114 




122 


271 


408 


139 


129 


21 








56 




56 


37 


136 


101 






01 






250 




240 


339 


533 


434 


215 


30 


122 




'75 


265 




240 


341 


885 


492 




20 








192 




232 


274 


473 


176 


i33 


86 








215 




180 




773 


219 


155 








329 


535 


53 


779 


1 290 


2 505 


1 941 


621 








Do 


98 




227 


504 


559 


239 


177 








99 


127 




87 


124 


317 


248 












116 




85 


253 


496 


528 


344 










47 




215 


409 


495 


41 1 


100 










43 








76 


117 










'24 


19 




'40 




83 


103 










54 






46 




100 














'85 




79 




379 


295 










98 


645 




635 


1 062 


2 274 


1 762 


644 


144 








362 




155 


534 


557 


236 


226 


36 






39 


192 




193 


298 


403 


448 




48 








91 




63 


114 


150 


















224 


1 16 


593 


551 




60 
















79 


105 




















418 


422 


418 


















21 






















53 








1 13 




278 


1,900 




1 678 


2 696 


5 903 


5 044 


2 854 


599 










31 


57 


153 


99 


34 








us 
no 


329 




295 


1 226 


795 


229 


165 




1 1 "i 




41 


149 




115 


901 

zy 1 


622 


682 


334 


yo 








178 




92 




237 


273 


140 


42 






42 


160 




169 


i42 


462 


512 


138 


101 






59 


206 




164 


325 


646 


576 


354 


135 








89 




59 


411 


455 


227 


103 


127 






Do 


113 




123 


244 


571 


821 


323 


99 








197 




164 




537 


542 


416 










479 




100 




1 425 


1 083 


847 








zoo 


524 




000 




1 "^91 
1 , OSl 


1 353 


334 








181 


243 






IRA 




515 










69 


281 




351 


446 


565 


780 


262 


















58 


58 


58 


















74 




74 




300 




180 


2,082 


200 


1,751 


3,313 


5,394 


4,647 


2,896 


691 


146 




70 


371 


85 


248 


1,171 


1,062 


431 


252 


122 


49 






239 


62 


220 


506 


710 


720 


227 


41 








106 




80 


134 


251 


234 


181 


22 


ios 






405 




328 


576 


995 


840 


630 


245 








124 




104 


162 


340 


464 


112 


57 






il6 


167 




169 


396 


661 


559 


160 


128 








235 


53 


197 


368 


565 


522 


486 


76 








435 




405 




810 


877 


848 





280 Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIII — Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 


Total 




Social 




Mathe- 








Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Name of High School 


ment 













3 619 


4 754 
'996 


3 974 


3 348 


2 822 


171 


DUD 


851 


855 


623 


435 


yo 


1 70 
1/0 


820 


920 


1 013 


869 


580 


51 


1R1 


471 


575 


490 


394 


346 




iD 


562 


982 


562 


562 


562 




/U 


702 


831 


840 


686 


685 


24 


171 


84 


216 


84 


84 


84 






129 


234 


130 


130 


130 






1 436 


1 633 


1 501 


1 309 


1 113 


73 


iZD 


215 


215 


215 


200 


* 167 


29 




629 


743 


632 


574 


493 


44 


46 


376 


455 


359 


336 


290 




57 


216 


220 


295 


199 


163 




23 


34 227 


42 114 


, O'Ju 


21 724 


28 243 


2 224 


12 877 


2*287 


2*772 


1 701 


1 684 


1*606 


243 


845 


2 193 


2*422 


1 725 


1 576 


1*473 


250 


778 


1 047 


1 * 140 


940 


694 


605 


123 


99 


2 505 


2*819 


1 870 


1 738 


1 423 


146 


697 


1 974 


2* 125 


1 * 535 


1 '447 


1 080 


147 


375 


1 836 


2 147 


1*370 


1*380 


1 * 101 


127 


588 


401 


549 


374 


* 193 


*288 




95 


1,414 


1,497 


1,147 


1,042 


670 


"46 


213 


130 


184 


130 


157 


140 






1 275 


1 654 


1 143 


735 


944 


137 


325 


583 


787 


540 


386 


442 




220 


1 248 


1 579 


1 051 


804 


1 202 


62 


600 


1 091 


1 * 122 


1 006 


633 


995 


60 


325 


815 


1 335 


951 


749 


844 




560 


1 055 


1 568 


1,043 

989 


506 


1 047 


44 


315 


1 297 


477 


989 


68 


507 


1 627 


2 236 


1 626 


743 


1 630 


104 


911 


1 555 


1 553 


1 484 


743 


1 556 


123 


935 


735 


1 006 


735 


364 


* 735 




226 


1 , uio 


1 417 


1 000 


466 


1 016 


78 


486 


1 218 


1 609 


1*220 


580 


1*224 


61 


605 


1 375 


1 881 


1 370 


1 367 


1*364 


95 


676 


1 293 


1 701 


1 283 


675 


1*292 


76 


625 


1 R7n 

1 , D/U 


2 120 


1 662 


750 


1*671 


77 


783 


1 532 


2 034 


1 532 


843 


1*533 


79 


541 


1 , ODO 


1 560 


1*428 


992 


1*373 


78 


547 


Qo 1 i;n 
6Z, lou 


36,841 




28 302 


25 307 


685 


2 820 


1 ,642 


1 not; 




1 078 


842 


97 


379 




1 7An 
1 , /^u 


1 241 


904 


636 


80 


232 




1 C1 7 

1,011 


2 172 


1 200 


703 


96 


269 


703 




1 n7c 


1 077 


1 077 




40 


1 ,480 


1 , 594 


1 , DID 
QRfi 

yoD 


1 1 89 


942 


90 


374 


1 1 0R 


1 QIC 


767 


491 


80 


1 13 


2, 174 


L , 040 




1 342 


1 134 


150 


390 


600 




oy 1 


361 


131 


38 


46 


626 


/ < 


04:0 


503 


499 






Kn^ 

OUL 


OD-1 


532 


432 


330 




107 


773 


958 


I Oo 




608 




75 


1 ,016 


1 , 170 


1 ,054 


y/o 


793 






1 , 188 


2,019 


1 , 820 


7Qt 






i48 


724 


834 


704 


724 


724 




33 


1,114 


1,212 


1,113 


1,448 


1,112 




92 


1,018 


1,111 


996 


996 


996 






944 


1,025 


895 


931 


932 




'49 


903 


1,184 
808 


903 


903 


903 




27 


1,089 


818 


537 


434 




172 


409 


611 


395 


790 


395 






748 




748 




748 






760 


760 


718 


786 


752 




'33 


633 


1,054 


633 


634 


634 




15 


1,193 


1,306 


1,193 


1,970 


1,204 




49 


914 


1,021 


914 


914 


954 




'65 


954 


1,118 


937 


1,217 


939 




1,019 


1,335 


993 


975 


994 




29 


842 


968 


844 


844 


841 






1,112 


1,280 


1,117 


1,110 


1,112 






953 


1,033 


952 


938 


956 






884 


965 


884 


884 


884 




'37 


729 


823 


716 


716 


711 




46 


95 


95 


95 


95 


95 




... 



136 Howard 

137 Howard County Sr 

138 Glenelg Sr.-Jr 

139 Harriet Tubman Sr.-Jr 

140 Waterloo Jr 

141 Ellicott City Jr 

142 Lisbon Jr 

143 Clarksville Jr 

144 Kent 

145 Galena Sr.-Jr 

146 Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

147 Garnett Sr.-Jr 

148 Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

149 Montgomery 

150 Walter Johnson Sr 

151 Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr.. . 

152 Gaithersburg Sr 

153 Montgomery Blair Sr 

154 Wheaton Sr 

155 Northwood Sr 

156 Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

157 Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr 

158 Rock Terrace Sr.-Jr 

159 Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

160 Damascus Sr.-Jr 

161 Springbrook Sr.-Jr 

162 Robert E. Peary Sr.-Jr 

163 West Rockville Jr 

164 Edwin W. Broome Jr 

165 Leland Jr 

166 Western Jr 

167 North Bethesda Jr 

168 Gatihersburg Jr 

169 Takoma Park Jr 

170 Montgomery Hills Jr 

171 Kensington Jr 

172 Eastern Jr 

173 Sligo Jr 

174 Col. Joseph Belt Jr 

175 Newport Jr 

176 Prince George's 

177 High Point Sr 

178 Bladensburg Sr 

179 Suitland Sr 

180 Surrattsville Sr 

181 Oxon Hill Sr 

182 Du Val Sr 

183 Northwestern Sr 

184 Central Sr 

185 Frederick Sasscer Sr.-Jr — 

186 Laurel Sr.-Jr 

187 Gwynn Park Sr.-Jr 

188 Frederick Douglass Sr.-Jr. . 

189 Fairmont Heights Sr.-Jr.. . . 

190 Beltsville Jr 

191 Bladensburg Jr 

192 Suitland Jr 

193 Benjamin Stoddert Jr 

194 Francis Scott Key Jr 

195 Surrattsville Jr 

196 Laurel Jr 

197 Oxon Hill Jr 

198 John Hanson Jr 

199 Kent Jr 

200 Hyattsville Jr 

201 Mt. Rainier Jr 

202 Rollingcrest Jr 

203 Maryland Park Jr 

204 Mary M. Bethune Jr 

205 Glenridge Jr 

205 Charles Carroll Jr 

207 Greenbelt Jr 

208 Buck Lodge Jr 

209 Lakeland Jr 



Maryland State Department of Education 281 



Each Maryland County Public High School: Fall of 1961 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 


Spanish 


Lan- 


culture 






Eco- 


Education 


Health 


Music 


and 


Education 


guages 




Arts 


» KJKjCLX/lKfUal 


nomics 




Education 




Crafts 




00 




137 


1,098 


84 


795 


1 314 


3 224 


2 355 


511 








66 


284 




153 


'7I8 


'380 


'228 


143 








71 


349 




164 


463 


618 


386 


65 










129 




169 


133 


391 


456 












158 




140 




1 048 


583 






00 






178 




169 




'489 


430 


173 


















168 


120 




















130 


152 


130 








96 


396 




441 


557 


1 249 


1 083 


263 


142 








89 




82 


78 


'214 


248 


93 


28 






79 


143 




143 


286 


463 


207 




R9 






27 


84 




137 


123 


355 


389 


74 


95; 

iO 








80 




79 


70 


217 


239 


96 


27 


2 186 


376 


277 


9,585 


1,061 


6 884 


8 993 


28,427 


11 056 


6 585 


1 098 


'444 


a 122 




663 


331 


'552 


1 576 


699 


350 


112 


/inn 


Oi 




581 




134 


698 


1 624 


688 


296 


245 


107 






194 


2i5 


106 


746 


715 


343 


104 


35 


458 


* 67 




704 


49 


357 


1 647 


1 223 


568 


299 


177 


243 


a 4g 




600 


295 


247 


1311 


1 '200 


447 


189 


93 


274 


a 5g 




760 




232 


1 021 


'939 


452 


310 


40 








100 






171 


350 


115 


113 


12 








355 


46i 


262 


1 066 


1 108 


320 


130 


178 








60 




42 




156 


26 


68 








102 


339 


41 


171 


495 


1 008 


338 


213 


99 






56 


185 




116 


217 


400 


247 


248 


g 








323 




228 


158 


1 242 
'992 


328 


224 










302 




164 


209 


347 


239 


101 








479 




614 




1,044 


424 


517 










218 




250 




1,096 


405 


216 










244 




256 


245 


920 


699 


219 










296 




264 


185 


1 565 


657 


234 










296 




260 


159 


1 315 


648 


425 










153 




159 




824 


260 


162 










428 




384 




1 000 


538 


312 










286 




297 




1 ' 128 


373 


247 










487 




390 


208 


1 303 


508 


386 










326 




312 




1 152 


368 


289 










455 




439 




1 569 


453 


274 










398 




402 




1 603 


409 


308 










353 




392 




1 375 


396 


213 




2 804 


145 


192 


11,261 


1,393 


10 493 


10 714 


31 407 


14 696 


12 098 


665 


'343 


a 83 




402 




286 


1 487 


1 067 


363 


154 


120 


174 


* 45 




218 


1,080 


290 


1 184 


763 


217 


185 


94 


352 






388 


285 


1 702 


681 


344 


374 


40 


7 






117 




211 


900 


233 


214 




298 






357 




287 


QRQ 

yoy 


834 


227 


127 


60 


256 






244 




208 


1 192 


1 o-t 


220 


lot 


an 
ou 


510 


b 27 




410 






1 474 


1 191 


loy) 


zty 


79 


58 






144 




yo 


ou/ 


/in? 


1 1 7 
1 1 / 


lUD 




122 




50 


91 




00 


000 


001 


OOQ 

zyy 


97R 


lA 


*o 






125 




1 "in 


07n 


4iy 


1 07 

ly i 


1 90 

izy 


A - 

10 


19 




50 


228 




194 


233 


972 


287 


489 


40 


85 




92 


576 




475 


onn 


2 741 


oyo 


493 


40 


190 






109 


313 


239 


oil 


1 ni n 
1 , UlU 


10/ 


195 










365 




ooD 




71/1 

/ 1* 


000 


OOi 




20 






302 




A.n 

H 1 




1 , lUO 


1 102 


1 ,UU-i 




31 






496 




±K7 
iOi 




1 /l^R 
1 ,100 


70^; 
1 £,0 


408 










384 




AAI 




007 

yz / 


Ann 


oOO 




18 






555 




ouy 




1 Ofijl 


/lOi 


/1 89 




102 






231 






40 < 


lOZ 


on 
yu 


dA 


An 








249 




Zoo 




Ol\) 


A\ 1 

410 


OR^ 
LOO 










364 




359 




756 


402 


434 




"ig 






351 




368 




750 


395 


340 










310 




308 




706 


568 


273 










616 




528 




1,191 


964 


369 




'53 






461 




408 




891 


501 


416 










390 




362 




954 


789 


384 










621 




584 




1,132 


808 


838 










448 




395 




841 


390 


454 




'57 






428 




413 




1,169 


714 


565 




44 






421 




405 




1,020 


538 


542 










456 




414 




2,505 


754 


446 










350 




329 




643 


469 


604 










54 




41 




95 


95 


95 





282 Ninety-Sixth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIII— Continued — Enrollment by Subject, Including Duplicates: 



Local Unit 


Total 




Social 




Mathe- 








Enroll- 


English 


Studies 


Science 


matics 


Latin 


French 


Name of High School 


ment 














1 ,661 


1 ,943 


1 ,677 


1 ,464 


1 , lo3 




233 




344 


416 


347 


. 282 


228 




35 




548 


733 


530 


508 


408 




76 




453 


452 


452 


380 


302 




81 


214 Stevensville Sr.-Jr 


316 


342 


348 


294 


215 




41 


215 St. Mart's 


2,503 


2,625 


2,490 


2,094 


1 ,869 




336 


216 Leonardtown Sr.-Jr 


486 


491 


500 


395 


338 




124 


217 banneker .^r.-Jr 


384 


471 


324 


287 


292 




39 


218 Margaret Brent Sr.-Jr 


410 


406 


430 


303 


274 






219 Great Mills Sr.-Jr 


502 


532 


545 


415 


341 


'29 


123 


220 G. Washington Carver Sr.-Jr. 


312 


316 


312 


285 


215 




50 




409 


409 


379 


409 


409 








1 , 8o9 


1 ,932 


2,026 


1 , lOa 


1,4(9 




502 




385 


419 


433 








7n 
/U 




111 


113 


143 


90 






6 




218 


219 


218 


213 


218 




34 




464 


468 


527 


409 


372 




111 




107 


107 


125 


109 


77 








545 


577 


551 


512 


AAR 




001 




29 


29 


29 


29 


29 






230 Talbot 


1,775 


2,244 


1,813 


1,657 


1,352 


66 


325 


231 Easton Sr.-Jr 


945 


1,150 


978 


831 


739 


66 


130 




472 


678 


476 


492 


372 




56 


Z66 St. Michael s Sr.-Jr 


358 


416 


359 


334 


241 




139 




8,855 


1 1 , 507 


9,539 


12, 123 


8,669 


66a 


592 




1 , 700 


2,282 


2, 190 


2,208 


1 ,255 


188 


1 0!; 




723 


955 


810 


1,116 


375 


142 


46 


237 North Hagerstown Sr 


1,782 


2,270 


1,851 


2,201 


1,128 


204 


248 




575 


663 


669 


807 


495 


47 


26 


239 Clear Spring Sr.-Jr 


546 


1 , 103 


523 


924 


816 


45 


44 


n 4 f\ TJ 1. T_ 


371 


373 


430 


401 


343 




QQ 

00 


241 Smithsburg Sr.-Jr 


504 


1 ,091 


636 


880 


580 


39 


1 


242 Hancock Int.-Jr 


88 


176 


64 


120 


120 






243 Boonsboro Jr 




455 


413 


779 


779 








734 


801 


695 


1,243 


1,243 








864 


824 


811 


938 


1,029 






246 Washington Jr 


513 


514 


447 


506 


506 






247 Wicomico 


4,354 


5,714 


4,665 


3,680 


3,311 


488 


554 


248 Wicomico Sr 


1,138 


1,315 


1,382 


714 


484 


97 


120 


249 Mardela Sr.-Jr 


296 


428 


313 


252 


219 




52 


250 Pittsville Sr.-Jr 


255 


372 


268 


228 


191 




51 




1,602 


1,800 


1,498 


1,557 


1,583 


225 


190 


252 Salisbury High 


1,063 


1,799 


1,204 


929 


834 


166 


141 


253 Worcester 


2,261 


2,942 


2,232 


1,991 


1,786 




661 




394 


473 


384 


350 


324 




191 


255 Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 


406 


569 


415 


337 


315 




111 


256 Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr. 


674 


770 


664 


595 


508 




189 


257 Worcester Sr.-Jr 


787 


1,130 


769 


709 


639 




170 



» Includes the following number taking German: Anne Arundel: Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr. — 42; Andover Sr.-Jr.— 42; Montgomery: 
Bethes da-Chevy Chase Sr.— 61; Walter Johnson Sr.— 122; Montgomery Blair Sr.— 67; Wheaton Sr.— 48; Northwood Sr.— 58; 
Prince George's: High Point Sr.— 83; Bladensburg Sr.— 45; Washington: South Hagerstown Sr.— 25; North Hagerstown Sr.— 16. 



Maryland State Department of Education 283 



i:ach Maryland County Public High School: FaU of 1961 





Other 




Industrial Education 






Physical 




Art- 






Foreign 


Agri- 




Home 


Business 


and 




Arts 


Driver 




Lan- 


nif 1 tiirp 

L.U1 but C 






Eco- 


Flduc^tion 


Health 


i usic 




rlHiifntinn 


guages 




Arts 


Vocational 


nomics 




ttuii 




Crafts 








143 


285 


394 


658 


1,012 


847 


74 


307 






31 




88 


165 


278 


244 




55 






49 


94 




130 


223 


296 


273 


74 


168 






63 


120 




106 


122 


166 


221 




14 








71 




70 


148 


272 


109 




70 


135 




132 


955 




784 


1,078 


2,323 


1 ,740 


1,340 


169 








121 




154 


244 


352 


291 


155 


26 






'9i 


143 




106 


125 


297 


310 


170 


46 


57 




41 


248 




131 


276 


596 


336 


246 


24 


78 






89 




104 


329 


372 


173 


162 


22 








140 




94 


104 


297 


221 


198 


51 








214 




195 




409 


409 


409 








107 


392 




540 


886 


1,797 


1,136 


22 








54 






133 


223 


359 


320 


















71 


111 


25 


22 










ii2 




iio 


45 


218 


106 












162 




174 


312 


389 


285 


















63 


160 












53 


iis 




i23 


172 


531 


400 




















29 












131 


347 




364 


751 


1,408 
686 


646 




175 






60 


176 




144 


434 


354 




175 






71 


106 




163 


63 


399 


173 












65 




57 


254 


323 


119 






374 


41 


258 


3,252 


289 


2,727 


2,782 


7,433 


5,396 


3,446 


257 


132 


a 25 


59 


325 


79 


281 


820 


1,024 


564 


218 


67 






67 


170 




132 


338 


464 


246 


125 


32 


242 


a ie 




738 


2i6 


458 


600 


1,251 


371 


160 


56 






64 


151 




128 


375 


491 


350 


243 


48 








134 




246 


323 


771 


414 


287 


24 








132 




111 


192 


358 


261 




11 






'68 


219 






134 


311 


342 




19 








54 




34 




oo 














257 




201 




542 


522 


49 i 










364 




370 




734 


745 


744 










435 




439 




842 


819 


864 










273 




243 




557 


658 


314 




298 




110 


1,528 




1,499 


1,803 


2,991 


2,275 


2,066 


684 


228 




16 


244 




141 


1,181 


258 


279 


129 


425 






27 


115 




115 


156 


268 


202 


183 


78 








99 




83 


151 


239 


178 


171 


41 






'20 


729 




700 




1,393 


825 


948 




'70 




47 


341 




460 


sis 


833 


791 


635 


UO 






109 


695 


11 


646 


861 


1,623 


1,396 


584 


216 








134 




127 


136 


295 


252 


117 


20 






'23 


161 




152 


155 


308 


203 


151 


73 






41 


226 




195 


382 


472 


280 


93 


27 






45 


174 


'ii 


172 


188 


548 


661 


223 


96 



^ Includes the following number taking Pussian: Baltimore: Ridgely Jr.-Dulaney Sr. — 26; Towson Sr. — 44; Prince George's: 
Northwestern Sr. — 17. 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 268-275 
Accreditation and certification, 70-75 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 186-187 

Expenditures, 258 

Per cent for, 184 

Superintendents, 2, 6-20. 245. 258 
Administration and finance, division of, 76-78 
Adult education, 213, 215-219, 261 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 212-213, 215-219 

Enrollment, 123, 134 

Each high school, 276-283 

Federal aid, 212-215 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 148 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution 
by type of fund, 180-183, 233, 254-255 

State teachers colleges, 226-227, 233, 240 

Vocational education, 211-215, 233, 255 

Vocational rehabilitation, 230-231, 234-235 
Appropriations 

County, 181-183, 205, 233, 250 

State, 181-183, 233, 254 
Art, high school 

Enrollment, 120, 146 

Each high school, 276-283 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 
Assessable basis, 206-208 
Attendance 

Average dally, 243 

Each high school, 268-275 

Per cent of, 243 

Teachers at summer school, 154 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 97-106 

Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 



B 

Bands, orchestras, chorus, 144-145 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 233, 254 
Belonging, average number, 243 
Each high school, 268-275 
Per teacher, 111 
Births, resident, 107-109 
Boards of Education, State, 2, 233, 234-235 
Boards of Education, counties, 6-20 
Bonds outstanding, school, 202 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 189 
High, 190 
Expenditures 

All schools, 259, 265 
Elementary, 266 
High, 267 

Per cent of current expense budget, 184 
Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic, 246-253 
Public, 242 
Graduates, high school, 115-122 
Budget 

Baltimore City, county, local, 181-183, 205 
State public school, 233 
State teachers colleges, 233, 240 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 
Number of, 150-152. 241 
Value of school, per pupil, 201 



B — (Continued) 

Business education 
Adult, 216-218 

Enrollment, 123, 140-141, 214, 216-218 
Each high school, 276-283 
Schools offering, 148, 276-283 
Teachers, 148 



c 

Capital outlay, school, 181, 184, 200 

By site, building, equipment, 203 
Certificate status, teachers, 160-162 
Certificates held by county teachers, 153, 155, 
160-162 

Chorus, bands, orchestras, 144-145 
Certification and accreditation, division of, 

70-75 
Classes 

Evening schools, 216-219 

Size of. 111 

Special for handicapped, 97-100 
Clerks, county schools, 244 
Colleges 

High school graduates 

of 1901 entering, 117-122 
of 1962 entering State teachers col- 
leges, 116 
Junior, 223, 225, 228 

State teachers, 220-227, 233, 230-239, 240 
Training teachers appointed in Maryland, 
153 

Commercial (see Business education) 

Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools, 150 
Transportation of pupils, 193-195 

Construction accounts. State teachers colleges, 
230-239 

Contents, table of, 21 

Cost per pupil 

Administration, 186-187 
Elementary and high, 188-190 
By type of school, 186-187 
Transported, 193-194 

Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors, 
6-20 

Courses in individual high schools, 208-275 
Crippled children, services for, 97-103, 105-106 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 185-190 
Expenditures 

All schools, 257 

Bv source of funds, 181-183 
By type of school, 265-267 



D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 87 

Days in session, 87 

Debt service, 202-205, 204 

Tax rate for, 204 
Disbursements (see Expenditures) 
Distributive education, 212-214, 218 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 147 

Schools offering, 148 

Teachers, 148 



E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 245 
Emergency certificates, 155, 160-162 
Employment of high school graduates, 117, 119 



284 



Index 



285 



E — (Continued) 

English, high school 

Enrollment, 123. 124-125 

Each high school, 276-283 
Schools offering, 148, 276-283 
Teachers, 148 
Enrollment 

Adult, 216-218 
Atypical children, 97-106 
Elementary, 88-96, 242, 24G-253 
Grade or year, 90, 92-96 
High school 

Course, each school, 268-275 
Subjects, 123-147 

Each school, 276-283 
Year, 90, 92-96 

Each school, 268-275 
Increase in, 89 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 88-89, 
94-96 

Number of different pupils, 89, 242 
Public, 88-91, 93 
State teachers college, 222-225 
Subject, 123-147 

Each school, 276-283 
Summary, 88-89 
Equalization fund, 182-183, 254 
Equiyalence examinations, 210 
Eyening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 216-218 
Expenditures, 212-213, 215, 261 
Expenditures, 

(see also Administration, Instruction, 
Operation, Maintenance, Fixed charges. 
Other school seryices, Payments to adjoin- 
ing units. Current expenses. Debt seryicc. 
Capital outlay) 

Elementary schools, 266 

Eyening schools, 212-213, 215, 201 

Health, 261 

High schools, 267 

Libraries, schools, 259 

Rehabilitation, 231, 234-235 

Salaries 

All schools, 259, 265 
Elementary, 266 
High, 267 
Vocational, 212-215 
State teachers colleges, 226-227, 233, 235, 

236-239, 240 
Total, by major classifications, 233, 257 
Transportation, 193-194, 261 
Vocational, Federal, 212-215 
Experience of teachers, 164-175 



F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 
Fall enrollment, 88, 90-96 
Federal aid 

Vocational education, 211-215 

Administration and superyision, 212- 
213 

Salaries of teachers, 212-214 
Fees in State teachers colleges, 226-227, 233, 
240 

Financial statements 

State public schools, 233, 254-267 

State teachers colleges, 233, 236-239, 240 
First grade nonpromotions, 114 
Fixed charges, 184, 186-187, 262 
Follow-up of graduates, 116-122 
French, high school 

Enrollment, 123, 132-133 

Each high school, 276-283 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 



G 

German (see French) 
Grade enrollment, 90, 92-96 
Graduates 

High school, 115-122 

Entering State teachers colleges, 116- 

119, 121 
From each school, 268-275 
Occupations of, 117-119 
State teachers college, 220-221 
Guidance, teachers of, 148 



H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 98, 105, 233 
Home instruction, 97-98, 102 
Hospital schools, 97-98, 102 
Institutions for, 98, 106 
Opportunities for education of, 97-100 
Preschool, 105 

Receipts from State for, 98, 105, 233, 254 
Health expenditures, all schools, 261 
Hearing, conseryation of, 97, 99-101, 103-104 
High school equiyalence examinations, 210 
High schools 

Disbursements, 267 

Individual, 268-275, 276-283 

Supervision, 245 
Home economics 

Adult, 212-213, 216-219 

Enrollment, 123, 135, 214 

Each high school, 276-283 

Federal aid, 212-215 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 
Home instruction of pupils, 97-98, 102 
Hospital instruction of pupils. 97-98, 102 



I 

Incorporated towTis. levy for. 204 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 51-61 
Cost per pupil, 188-190 
Expenditures, 265-267 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 259 
State teachers colleges, 227 
Per cent of current expense budget, 184 
Inventories, State teachers colleges. 227 



J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 245 
Junior colleges, 223, 225, 228, 254 



K 

Kindergartens, 90, 92-96 
Nonpublic, 246-253 



L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 23-25 

Length of school session, 87 

Letter of transmittal, 22 

Levies, county, 205 

Librarians, county, 6 



28G 



Index 



L — (Continued) 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 232, 233 

Public, 6, 232, 233 

School, 259, 265-267 
Library extension, division of, 62-65 
Lip reading classes, 104 
Loans to students, college, 235 
Lunch program, school, 196-199, 255, 261 



M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 188-190 

Expenditures, 260, 265-267 

Per cent of current expense budget, 184 
Materials of instruction (see Books and instruc- 
tional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 123, 130-131 

Each high school, 276-283 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 
Medical examinations, bus drivers, 254 
Men teachers, 149, 244 

Mentally handicapped children, 97-103, 105, KXi 
Milk program, special, 197, 255, 201 
Minimum program. State, 180 
Minutes, State Board, 26-50 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 123, 144-145 

Each higli school, 276-283 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 144-145 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 



N 

National Defense Education Act, 211, 255 
Night schools (see Evening schools. Adult edu- 
cation) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 113-114 

First grade, 114 

High School, 112 
Number belonging, 243 

Each higli school, 268-275 

Per teaclier. 111 
Number of different pupils, 89, 242 
Number of schools 

For atypical cliildren, 106 

Having one teacher, 150, 241 

Nonpublic, 88, 246-253 

Public, 88, 241 

Elementary, 150, 151-152, 241 
High, 151-152, 241 



o 

Occupations of higli scliool graduates, 117-119 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 150 

Number belonging in, 150 

Number of, 150, 241 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 188-190 

Expenditures, 260, 265-267 

Per cent of current expense budget, 184 
Orchestras, bands, chorus, 144-145 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil, 188-190 

Expenditures, 261, 265-267 

Per cent of current expense budget, 184 



P 

Parent-teacher associations, 209 
Parochial and private schools, 88-89, 94-96, 
246-253 

Part-payment of salaries, 254 

Payments to adjoining units, 262 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Ph.ysical education and health, 261 

Phvsical education and recreation, high school 

Enrollment, 123, 142-143 

Each high school, 276-283 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 
Physical examinations (see Medical examina- 
tions) 

Physically handicapped children, 97-106 

Preparation, teachers, 156-159 

Preschool handicapped, 105 

Presidents of State teachers colleges, 6 

Professional and clerical staffs, countv, 245 

Private and parochial schools, 88-89, 94-90, 

246-253 
Property, valuation of 

Counties and Baltimore Citv, 206-207 

School, 201 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 6-20 

Supervisors of, 245 
Salaries, 261 

Pupils, 

Atypical, 97-106 

Nonpublic, 88-89, 94-96, 246-253 

One-teacher schools, 150 

Per teacher, 111 

Public school 

Enrollment, 88-91, 93, 242 

Number attending, 243 

Number belonging, 243 

Per cent of attendance, 243 
Transported, 193-194 



R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 256 
Federal government, 255 
Evening schools, 215 
Teachers salaries, 212-215 
Vocational education, 211-215 
State, 254 

Distributed by type of fund, 181-183, 

233, 254 
Evening schools, 215 
Total and per cent, 181-183 
Teachers colleges, 226-227, 233, 240 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-5, 84-86, 230-231, 

233, 234-235 
Repair, utility men, janitors, 245 
Research and development, division of, 79-83 
Kesident births, 107-109 
Resignations, teachers, 176-178 
Retarded children, progiams for, 97-106 
RetiremeTit system for teachers, 5, 229, 233 
Russian (see French) 



s 

Salaries 

Per cent of school budget, 184 
Superintendents', 258 
Supervisors', 259 

Pupil personnel, 261 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 191-192 

Cost per pupil for, 188-190 
Total 

Elementary, 266 

High, 267 
Vocational, 212-215 



Index 



287 



S — (Continued) 

School lunch program, 196-199, 255, 2G1 
Schools 

For atypical children, 106 

Number of, 88-89, 150, 151-152, 241, 246- 

253 

Science, high school 

Enrollment, 123, 128-129 

Each high school, 276-283 
Schools offering, 148, 276-283 
Teachers, 148 
Session, length of, 87 
Sex of teachers, 149, 244 
Size of 

Classes, 111 
Schools 

Each high school, 268-275 
Elementary. 150, 151-152 
High, 151-152 
Teaching staff, 88-89, 150, 244 
Social studies, high school 
Enrollment, 

Each high school, 276, 283 
Schools offering, 148, 276-283 
Teachers, 148 
Spanish (see French) 
Special classes for handicapped, 97-106 
Special high school teachers, 148 
Special milk program, 197, 255, 261 
State 

Aid to schools, 181-183 

Minimum program, 180 
Showing various funds, 233, 254 
Board of Education, 2 

Excerpts from minutes of, 26-50 
Department of Education, 2-5, 233, 234-235 
Public school budget, 233, 234-235 
Teachers colleges, 6, 116, 119, 121, 220- 

227, 233, 235, 238-239, 240 
Teachers' retirement system, 229, 233 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Business 
education) 

Subjects studied in high schools, 123-147 

Each high school, 276-283 
Summer school attendance, county teachers, 15 4 
Superintendents, 2, 6-20, 245 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 188-190 

Cost, salaries, expenses, 259 

By type of school, 265-267 

Names of, 2-5, 6-20 

Number of, 245 

Per cent of current expense budget, 184 
Salaries of, 259, 265-267 
State, 2-5 



T 

Table of contents, 21 

Taxable basis, 206-208 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 184 

Tax rates, county, 204 

Teachers (s) 

Academic, high scliool, 148 

Average salary, 191-192 

CertiHcate status, 160-162 

Certification, 70-75, 153, 155, 160-162 

Colleges, 6, 116, 119, 121, 220-225, 226- 
227, 233, 235, 236-239, 240 



T — (Continued) 

Experience, 164-175 
Number of, 24 4 

For each liigh school subject, 148 
In each high school, 268-275 
In schools of each type 
Atvpical, 106 
Nonpublic, 88-89, 246-253 
Public, 88, 89, 244 
Of atypical children, 99-101, 104, 106 
Preparation, 156-159 
Pupils per. 111 
Resignations, 176-178 
Salaries, average, 191-192 
Sex of, 149, 244 

Special subjects, high school, 148 
Summary, elementary and high, public and 

nonpublic, 88-89 
Summer school attendance, 154 
Training institutions, 220-225, 226-227, 

233, 235, 236-239, 240 
Turnover of, 163, 176-179 
Teachers' retirement system 

Financial statements, 229, 233 
Staff, 5 

Teachers' contributions to, 229 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 212-213, 215-219 

Enrollment, 123, 136-139, 214, 216-218 
Each high school. 276-283 

Federal aid. 211-215 

Schools offering, 148, 276-283 

Teachers, 148 
Training centers. State teachers colleges, 222- 
224 

Transmittal, letter of, 22 
Transportation of pupils 

Cost, total and per pupil, 193-194, 261 

Per cent transported, 193-194 
Turnover in teaching staff, 163, 176-179 



V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 206-208 
School property, 201 
Vocational education 
Division of, 66-69 
Enrollment 

Day schools, 123, 136-139, 214 
Evening schools, 218 
Federal aid. 21 1-215, 233, 255 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-5, 84-86, 23n-231, 
233, 234-235 



w 

Wealth back of each pupil belonging, 208 

Wealth per capita, 208 

Withdrawals 

Pupils, 110 

Teachers, 170-178 



Y 

Year, length of school, 82 



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